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Basheer S.,TransBiodiesel | Watanabe Y.,Osaka Municipal Technical Research Institute
Lipid Technology | Year: 2016

Lipase-catalyzed production of biodiesel has been proven an effective method, particularly for using low-quality feedstocks. Recently, different lipases in their free and immobilized forms have been proposed and used at lab as well as at semi- and full-industrial scales using second generation feedstocks characterized by a high content of free fatty acids (FFAs). Enzymatic production of biodiesel using third generation feedstocks derived from oleaginous microorganisms has also been successfully evaluated. However further research is still needed in order to justify economically the production of biodiesel from such feedstocks as well as eliminate technical challenges related to the performance of the enzyme. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.


Tafesh A.,TransBiodiesel | Basheer S.,TransBiodiesel
Green Energy and Technology | Year: 2013

Biodiesel has emerged as one of the most growing biofuels to replace diesel fuel. Its preference as one of the most popular alternative fuels was based on its characteristics as it is environment friendly, sustainable, biodegradable, and non-toxic. Biodiesel is mandated by many governments worldwide for incorporation into their diesel supply base. Biodiesel is easily produced through transesterification reactions of vegetable oils (triglycerides). However, current commercial usage of refined vegetable oils for biodiesel production is impractical and uneconomical due to high feedstock cost and priority as food resources. Low-grade oils, typically waste cooking oils, brown greases, crude corn oils, etc., can be better alternatives; however, the high free fatty acids (FFAs) content in such oils has become the main constrain for those potential feedstocks, and therefore pretreatment methods become necessary to prepare such feedstocks to make biodiesel. The chapter highlights the pretreatment methods to utilize and convert the FFAs from various feedstocks to biodiesel and presents the advantages and limitations of using enzymes and conventional catalysts, distillation, blending, and glycerolysis methods to lower FFAs in the feedstocks. An overview on the current status of biodiesel production, the feedstocks and the FFAs factors are also discussed. With the proper pretreatment methods, the high-FFAs feedstocks can indeed become the next ideal feedstocks for the production of biodiesel. © Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2013.


Tafesh A.,TransBiodiesel | Basheer S.,TransBiodiesel
International News on Fats, Oils and Related Materials | Year: 2015

The manufacturing of commercial-scale biodiesel can be carried out by different technologies. The main technologies include the use of homogenous alkaline- and acidbased catalysts, heterogeneous alkaline- and acid-based catalysts, high energy-aided reactions, and the use of enzyme-based catalysts. The most widely used industrial process for biodiesel production is based on using alkaline catalysts, such as sodium/potassium methylate (K/NaOCH3). Despite its simplicity and industrial applicability, this process requires the use of high-grade feedstocks [free fatty acid (FFA) values lower than 1%] and is energy consuming. Glycerol recovery from the process is difficult, undesirable byproducts are formed, low yields are mostly dependent on the initial FFAs and water content of feedstock, wastewater treatment is required, and government subsidies are perpetually required to reach profitability.


Disclosed is a process for the preparation of an interfacial enzyme immobilized on an insoluble support, by providing a bi-phase system comprised of an aqueous buffer solution and at least one first organic solvent; mixing said interfacial enzyme with the bi-phase system provided; adding the support to the obtained mixture and mixing; and isolating from the mixture obtained in the last step the interfacial enzyme immobilized on said support. The produced enzyme is locked in its catalytically active confirmation, and thus exhibits improved activity and stability. Also disclosed are uses of the produced enzymes, particularly in the preparation of biodiesel.


Biodiesel is a fuel produced by mixing different renewable feedstocks (oils and fats), methanol, and a catalyst. The chemical process called transesterification is carried out in the presence of alkaline or acid-based catalysts ...


TransBiodiesel | Entity website

CEOThe Regional R and D Center-The Galilee SocietyP.O ...


TransBiodiesel | Entity website

TransBiodiesel produces immobilized enzyme-based biocatalysts for production of first and second generation biodiesel fuels, complying with ASTM and EN specifications. Biocatalysts are environment-friendly, and enable the use of first and second generation feedstocks, while lowering the total production costs of biodiesel fuels ...


TransBiodiesel | Entity website

Home TransBiodiesel produces immobilized enzyme-based biocatalysts for production of first and second generation biodiesel fuels, complying with ASTM and EN specifications. Biocatalysts are environment-friendly, and enable the use of first and second generation feedstocks, while lowering the total production costs of biodiesel fuels ...


TransBiodiesel | Entity website

TransBiodiesel provides the technical support needed for successful implementation of its innovative enzyme technology. The Company supports retrofitting of existing biodiesel plants and provides the design, needed for retrofitting of the process equipment to adjust the whole unit to the enzymatic process ...

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