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News Article | May 22, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) released new statistics on the dangers of parasites and swimming pool safety in the United States. Recent independent studies confirm that Clear Comfort’s advanced oxidation sanitation systems are proven effective against the parasites highlighted by the CDC. With its breakthrough technology, Clear Comfort delivers safer, healthier swimming while addressing public safety concerns that are growing at an ever increasing rate. According to the CDC, reports of parasitic infection outbreaks linked to swimming pools and recreational water doubled from 2014 to 2016. Clear Comfort’s commercial pool sanitation system uses a hydroxyl-based advanced oxidation process that helps public and private swimming pools destroy dangerous water-borne parasites. An independent study from the University of Colorado found that Clear Comfort’s advanced oxidation sanitation achieved more than 99.99 percent reduction of Cryptosporidium treated by the system. In addition to reducing the risk of parasite outbreaks, the Clear Comfort system has demonstrated decreased chlorine consumption by 30 to 50 percent in aquatics facilities, such as the SwimMAC Training Center in North Carolina, YMCAs, Jewish Community Centers and municipal pools. Reducing chemical use with superior disinfection helps eliminate toxic disinfection byproducts, improves water and air quality and lowers risk of swimmers of contracting potentially life-threatening water-borne illnesses. Competitive swimmers are at high risk for respiratory issues because of consistent exposure to DBPs. DBPs form when chlorine interacts with organic matter in the pool and are proven to cause eye irritation, allergies, asthma, Lifeguard Lung and other health issues. “Clear Comfort focuses on making swimming a healthy and happy experience,” says Clear Comfort CEO and founder Steve Berens. “We're glad to see the CDC continues its focus on making a favorite pastime safer and healthier for swimmers and pool professionals. We look forward as state, county and city health departments adopt these best practices.” The Clear Comfort system has improved management of public pools, while reducing costs and energy consumption. Clear Comfort has provided healthy, cost-effective benefits to facilities like the University of Arizona, luxury athletic clubs, swim schools, professional sports teams, recreation centers and hotels throughout the United States. For information about reports on Clear Comfort, visit clearcomfort.com/studies. About Clear Comfort Clear Comfort manufactures and sells hydroxyl-based, advanced oxidation systems for pools and spas. Clear Comfort’s commercial systems enable customers to reduce their chlorine use by 30 to 50 percent, while the residential product provides complete, non-chlorine water treatment. With headquarters and manufacturing in Colorado, Clear Comfort’s “Made in the USA” product is a truly sustainable offering for customers. For more information about Clear Comfort, visit http://www.clearcomfort.com.


News Article | May 19, 2017
Site: www.futurity.org

A Reagan-era federal government program that subsidizes farmers to plant year-round grasses and native shrubs instead of crops has had a surprisingly large and beneficial effect on the Eastern Washington sage grouse population, a new study shows. Although the program was adopted for many different reasons, the study finds it is probably the reason that sage grouse still live in portions of Washington’s Columbia Basin. “Without these lands, our models predict that we would lose about two thirds of the species’ habitat, and that the sage grouse would go extinct in two of three subpopulations,” says first author Andrew Shirk, a research scientist with the University of Washington Climate Impacts Group. The study appears in an upcoming issue of the Journal of Wildlife Management. The Conservation Reserve Program (CRP) began in 1985. It is a voluntary federal program that pays farmers to plant agricultural land with environmentally beneficial vegetation for 10- to 15-year contracts. The program’s goals include improving water quality, reducing soil erosion, and boosting wildlife habitat. Of the roughly 24 million acres planted through the program in the United States, about 1.4 million acres are in Eastern Washington. The fields are planted with native shrubs and perennial grasses that provide cover for sage grouse and other animals. “From the outset, it was envisioned that the CRP program would be good for wildlife,” Shirk says. “But I don’t think anyone expected that it would be this valuable. Our results show CRP isn’t a substitute for native sagebrush, but mature CRP fields nearby augment native habitat and have had a tremendous positive impact—it’s a wildlife conservation success story.” In Eastern Washington, the sage grouse population has declined by 77 percent since 1960, and only about 8 percent of the birds’ historic habitat remains. The population stabilized at about 1,000 birds in the early 1990s—about when the fields planted as part of the Reagan-era CRP program first reached maturity. Washington sage grouse live in three main areas: the Yakima Training Center in the southern part of the state; Moses Coulee in the center of the state; and Crab Creek to the east. The Yakima Training Center is a US Army training area where the native sagebrush habitat is mostly intact. But the other two areas are heavily agricultural, with irrigated farmland around the Columbia River and wheat fields farther from water. Sage grouse in other Western states are threatened mostly by oil and gas exploration and other types of development. “Eastern Washington is a unique landscape. It’s a patchwork of irrigated agriculture, dryland agriculture, and CRP land,” Shirk says. Previously, studies of sage grouse across their range in the United States suggested Eastern Washington agricultural areas would not be hospitable for the birds. Indeed, Washington’s habitat is a relatively small island separated from the broader sagebrush seas in Montana, Wyoming, Idaho, Oregon, and Nevada. “The other studies generally predicted that Eastern Washington was a place that shouldn’t support sage grouse because most of the habitat was converted to agricultural lands. Everything suggested that the historical populations should be extinct,” Shirk says. “And yet they’re still here.” The authors’ results show that without the federally-subsidized CRP lands dominated by native grass and big sagebrush, sage grouse in Eastern Washington would only have about one-third the amount of usable habitat, and the two subpopulations in agricultural areas would become so small that they would likely go extinct. “When populations get too small, and too disconnected from other populations, they become very fragile,” Shirk says. A harsh winter, for example, could decimate a small population. On the flipside, the analysis shows that if Washington’s CRP lands were reallocated to be near existing sage grouse populations, to maximize benefit to the birds, their habitat could increase “Increasing the habitat by two-thirds by reallocating CRP fields to be near native sagebrush habitat demonstrates the potential for this program to be used as a conservation tool,” Shirk says. “There was anecdotal evidence that this program was important for sage grouse, but I don’t think anyone suspected that the magnitude would be this big.” Coauthor Michael Schroeder with the Washington Department of Fish & Wildlife has been monitoring Washington sage grouse for decades. His data of sage grouse sightings from 1992 to 2014 allowed the researchers to model how much various factors matter for the population’s success. The authors looked at each season, including winter, when agricultural fields are bare, and spring, when sage grouse are nesting. In Washington, big sagebrush tends to grow taller than in other places, and the higher branches leave ground-level nests more exposed to elements and predators. “Many people focus only on the presence and amount of sagebrush,” Schroeder says. “While native sagebrush is clearly important, perennial bunchgrass provides cover for many species, including sage grouse.” Schroeder’s research shows that the CRP also benefits other sagebrush dwellers, including sage thrashers, Brewer’s sparrows, savannah sparrows, vesper sparrows, and sagebrush sparrows. These lands could become more valuable to wildlife in a changing climate. “As the climate changes, species need to be able to move across the landscape to track their habitat,” Shirk says. “Sage grouse habitat is likely to shift under climate change, and yet barriers like major roads and power lines may limit the ability of this species to migrate accordingly. If there was a strategic vision for how CRP land was allocated, some of it could be used to facilitate the movement of sage grouse and other species over time to track their climate niche.”


News Article | May 18, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

Thirteen people – 12 men and one woman – will walk the stage Friday, May 19 as graduates of Kalamazoo Valley Community College’s 84th Police Officer Training Academy. Nine of the graduates of the academy were sponsored by Kalamazoo Department of Public Safety and will join the force and begin working as public safety officers for the city of Kalamazoo following graduation. Graduates from the academy enjoy the highest employment rate in the state. A total of 92 percent of alumni are employed in the field, compared to a statewide average of 69 percent, according to Paul Bianco, director of Kalamazoo Valley’s Law Enforcement Training Center. “Kalamazoo Valley’s Police Officer Training Academy is recognized as the leading police training facility in the region, consistently graduating high achievers,” said Bianco. There is currently a state-wide shortage of certified and qualified police officers. The Michigan Commission on Law Enforcement Standards (MCOLES) website shows 100 agencies throughout the state hiring either part-time or full-time officers. Graduation takes place at 3 p.m. in the Dale B. Lake Theater on the college’s Texas Township Campus and is open to the public. The Honorable Michael McKay of Van Buren County’s 7th District Court is the guest speaker. The next Police Officer Training Academy at Kalamazoo Valley begins August 21 and runs from 6 a.m. to 6 p.m. Monday through Friday at the Law Enforcement Training Center on the Groves Campus of Kalamazoo Valley Community College. For more details and an application packet, go to http://www.kvcc.edu/police.


News Article | May 19, 2017
Site: www.prnewswire.com

Eliot Tatelman, President and CEO of Jordan's Furniture, says," I look forward to the Walk/Run each year, when I am able to meet so many wonderful families! Many I have already met at one of Jordan's adoption events, before they were united as a family. I am proud that Jordan's has been a partner with MARE for 19 years and that we have helped make permanent, loving homes a reality for so many great kids." The family-friendly event kicks off at 10:00 am with a 5K race followed by an after party filled with food, music, and activities including kids' fun races, face painting, balloon artistry, arts and crafts, and a parkour challenge. Registration is $35; $15 for kids 3-12. If you register online, you can form a team and/or create your own fundraising page and help provide even more support for adoption from foster care. By participating in the Jordan's Furniture Walk/Run for Adoption you will help change a child's life by supporting MARE's work to recruit adoptive parents for children and youth in state care. Nationwide, there are over 112,000 children waiting in foster care, in need of adoption. In Massachusetts, nearly 2,800 children currently in foster care have the goal of adoption, and more than 800 of those children have no relative or other potential adopter. Older, school-aged children, sibling groups, children of color and/or children with special needs tend to wait the longest for families. "We are so grateful for our relationship with Jordan's Furniture, along with the support of the many other companies and individuals who support this event", said MARE's Executive Director Lisa Funaro. "With their generosity and assistance we are able to continue in our 60-year mission to place children and teens from foster care into loving adoptive homes." Organizations sponsoring the event include EY, Hub Parkour Training Center, Wellesley Bank Charitable Foundation, Insource Services, Brookline Bank, Zemcar, KPMG, Florence Electric, Webster One Source, and Redfin. To register for the event or to make a donation, visit http://jordanswalkforadoption.org. To learn about adoption from foster care, contact MARE at 617-54-ADOPT (542-3678) or visit www.MAREinc.org To view the original version on PR Newswire, visit:http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/annual-walkrun-for-adoption-helps-local-children-find-adoptive-homes-300460297.html


News Article | May 26, 2017
Site: www.enr.com

Training in how to work more safely at heights and within confined spaces will now be among the offerings available at the Apprenticeship and Skills Training Center operated by the Utah Chapter of the Associated General Contractors of America. With government and industry officials in attendance, Utah AGC 2017 Chairman Michael Kurz, Staker Parson Cos., and Utah State Senator Karen Mayne (D-West Valley City) cut the ceremonial ribbon on May 23 for the new components at the training center. “It is our plan to truly wear this equipment out,” said Kurz. “Training our people to work safely so they can go home each night to their families is the most important thing we can do.” The equipment consists of a concrete detention vault for confined-space work and rescue training and a 24-ft-tall tower with a 28-ft-long platform for fall prevention training. The components were purchased with a $45,000 grant from the Utah Labor Commission, AGC member funds and materials donations. Oldcastle Precast Inc. donated the detention vault, and safety-equipment manufacturer Honeywell provided the harnesses and rescue winches. Both are AGC-member firms. “It is vitally important to the Labor Commission to ensure the safety of workers in the state of Utah, and AGC is a great partner in that effort,” said Utah State Labor Commissioner Jaceson Maughan at the event. Maughan and AGC President Rich Thorn noted the facility will be available not just for workers in the construction industry but also local firefighters and other public safety workers as well. Mayne, who has championed worker-safety legislation along with the AGC of Utah, praised the new facility. “We need to do everything we can to keep our people safe and keep them working,” she said. Thorn said the idea for the training facility came from a visit to an AGC chapter facility in San Diego.


News Article | May 29, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

ANRS 12286 MOBIDIP(1), a clinical trial running in parallel in three countries in sub-Saharan Africa (Cameroon, Burkina Faso, and Senegal), shows that dual therapy with lamivudine and a boosted protease inhibitor is effective as second-line treatment in patients infected by HIV with multiple mutations. Such treatment de-escalation will reduce costs, side effects, and the need for virological monitoring of patients. The results of this study, led by Laura Ciaffi (TransHIVMI; Inserm-IRD-Université de Montpellier) and Sinata Koulla-Shiro (ANRS site -Cameroon), is published in The Lancet HIV on May 28, 2017. Second-line treatments of HIV infection recommended by the WHO for resource-limited countries are highly effective. However, there is currently no reliable way of de-escalating these treatments, while maintaining an undetectable viral load. Two strategies may provide a solution. The first is monotherapy with a boosted protease inhibitor (BPI), which in several trials has already yielded encouraging results, albeit with a risk of increased viral load. Such an increase constitutes a risk in resource-limited countries because patients there do not have access to regular virological monitoring, which can identify treatment failure. The second strategy is to combine a BPI with lamivudine, which is inexpensive, well tolerated, often used first line, and effective. This combination, however, has never been evaluated in patients infected by HIV with mutations that confer drug resistance, notably to lamivudine (M184V). ANRS 12286 MOBIDIP is the first trial to compare these two treatment de-escalation strategies in resource-limited countries, in patients with viremia controlled by second-line treatment. ANRS 12286 MOBIDIP: assessing the efficacy of a new therapeutic strategy ANRS 12286 MOBIDIP was led from 2014 and 2016 by Laura Ciaffi of TransHIVMI (joint Inserm-IRD-Université de Montpellier research unit, directed by Eric Delaporte of IRD/Université de Montpellier) and Sinata Koulla-Shiro (ANRS site - Cameroon) and her colleagues in 3 countries of sub-Saharan Africa (Cameroon, Burkina Faso, and Senegal). The study's 265 patients(2) had an initial viral load below 200 copies/mL, and were followed up for 96 weeks. The main purpose of ANRS 12286 MOBIDIP was to compare the failure rates of the two therapeutic strategies: monotherapy and dual therapy. Half the study patients received BPI treatment and the other half were given BPI plus lamivudine. After 48 weeks of treatment, monotherapy was interrupted and the patients resumed triple drug therapy. The patients on dual therapy continued their treatment till week 96. The rate of treatment failure, defined as a viral load above 500 copies/mL, was 3% (4/132 patients) for dual therapy and 24.8% for monotherapy (33/133 patients). CD4 cell count increased greatly in the patients on dual therapy (65 versus 12 cells/mm3), indicating increased immune defense. Overall, both treatments were well tolerated by the patients. ANRS 12 286 MOBIDIP has provided the first evidence of the efficacy of de-escalated second-line therapy, which is less costly and better tolerated than triple-drug therapy in patients infected by HIV with multiple mutations. This dual therapy combining BPI and lamivudine could be appropriate in resource-limited countries with economic and virological monitoring constraints. Moreover, the use of lamivudine, which is already used in first-line treatment, could avoid the switch to another class of drugs, which could be prescribed later if necessary. (1) Evaluation of a maintenance strategy using protease inhibitor with or without lamivudine in patients in Africa (Yaoundé, Bobo-Dioulasso, Dakar) with a viral load controlled by second-line antiretroviral therapy (2) These patients were from ANRS 12169 2LADY (comparative trial of second-line triple drug therapies). Boosted protease inhibitor monotherapy versus boosted protease inhibitor plus lamivudine dual therapy as second line maintenance treatment in HIV-1 infected patients in Sub Saharan Africa (ANRS12 286/MOBIDIP): a randomized, controlled, open-label superiority trial. Laura Ciaffi1, Sinata Koulla-Shiro2, Adrien Sawadogo3, Cheik Tidiane Ndour4, Sabrina Eymard-Duvernay1, Pretty Rosereine Mbouyap2, Liliane Ayangma5, Jacques Zoungrana3, Ndeye Fatou Ngom Gueye6, Mohamadou Diallo4, Suzanne Izard1, Guillaume Bado3, Coumba Toure Kane7, Avelin Aghokeng1,8, Martine Peeters1, Pierre Marie Girard9, Vincent Le Moing1, Jacques Reynes1, Eric Delaporte1 for the MOBIDIP Study Group. The Lancet HIV, 28 may 2017. 1IRD UMI 233 - INSERM U1175 - Montpellier University, Montpellier France, 2ANRS Research Centre Cameroon, Central Hospital, Yaoundé Cameroon, 3Day Care Center, University Hospital Souro Sanou, Bobo Dioulasso Burkina Faso, 4Research and Training Center (CRCF), Fann University Hospital, Dakar Senegal, 5Ambulatory Treatment Center, Military Hospital, Yaounde Cameroon, 6Day Care Center, Fann University Hospital, Dakar Senegal, 7CHU A Le Dantec Laboratoire de Bactériologie-Virologie Dakar, Sénégal 8Virology laboratory IMPM-IRD Centre de Recherche sur les Maladies Emergentes, Yaounde Cameroon, 9Department of Infectious and Tropical Diseases, Saint-Antoine Hospital, AP-HP INSERM UMR S 1136, Paris France


News Article | April 23, 2017
Site: news.yahoo.com

Fan Wang and Yuan Yue of China, Barbara Seixas De Freitas and Fernanda Alves of Brazil, and Isabel Schneider and Victoria Bieneck of Germany, pose with their medals at the FIVB Beach Volleyball World Tour Xiamen Open 2017 in Xiamen, China; Spain’s Rafael Nadal holds up his trophy after winning his men’s finals match against Spain’s Albert Ramos-Vinolas at the Monte Carlo Tennis Masters tournament in Monaco; and Athletes compete in the Men’s 100-meter finals during Day 3 of the 2017 Loterias Caixa Paralympics Athletics Open Championships at Brazilian Paralympic Training Center in Sao Paulo. See more news-related photo galleries and follow us on Yahoo News Photo Tumblr


Haagen is proud to announce that it has reached an agreement with Tawazun Safety and Security Disaster Management City “Jaheziya” to design and build a wide range of fire training simulators for a new state of the art Disaster Management and Emergency Response Training Center in Abu Dhabi. The official agreement was recently signed for the first two phases of the project by Haagen President Leon Timmermans and the Chairman of Jaheziya, H.E Ali Bin Musleh Al Ahbabi. ​Jaheziya is expected to span 100 hectares. Haagen is responsible for designing and constructing the fire training simulators. The center will also include classroom facilities and overnight accommodations in addition to the fire training props. “We are thrilled to support Jaheziya in their quest to build one of the largest and most technologically advanced training grounds in the world. We look forward to supporting them in every step of the design and build process,” remarked President Leon Timmermans. The design phase of the project is expected to be completed by mid-2017 with construction slated to begin shortly after. For additional information on Haagen training tools and custom fire training centers, contact them at +31 (0)13 507 6800 or visit the company’s website at Haagen.com. ​


News Article | April 17, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

Head Over Heels Athletic Arts (HOH) is pleased to announce that six of their athletes have qualified to JO National and Western National Championships. Western National Championships will take place April 28-30, 2017 in Boise, ID and the Junior Olympic National Championships will take place May 6-7, 2017 in Indianapolis, IN. Casey Brown, Sumi Cameron, Nina Schank, Kaya Allison, Alessandra, and Claire Dean are Level 9 and 10 gymnasts, the highest levels in the Junior Olympic Program. These young athletes train between 20 and 35 hours per week. “The commitment these young ladies have made to our sport is impressive,” says HOH head coach Mikaela Glass. “To reach this level of achievement, they give up much of the social aspect of their teen years to train. These ladies are so amazing and focused. It is a pleasure to be able to train them.” The Junior Olympic National Championships is the culmination event for the competitive season. The competition features twelve age divisions (Junior A, Junior B, Junior C, Junior D, Junior E, Junior F, Senior A, Senior B, Senior C and Senior D, Senior E, Senior F), which are determined by birth date. These gymnasts are vying to become Junior Olympic national champions in the all-around, as well as in all four events: vault, uneven bars, balance beam and floor exercise. USA Gymnastics has eight regions and the top seven gymnasts in each age division from each region’s Regional Championships advance to nationals. The winning Regions will also be determined at the conclusion of the competition. The top four all-around athletes in each of the twelve age divisions also qualify to the 2017 Junior Olympic National Team and are invited to attend a National Training Camp at the USA Gymnastics National Team Training Center at the Karolyi Ranch, a U.S. Olympic Training Site, in Huntsville, Texas. The U.S. Junior Olympic National Championships is one of the national championships of USA Gymnastics, the sport’s national governing body in the United States. Many Junior Olympic champions have gone on to make the U.S. National Team and represent the United States in international competition and/or to compete in collegiate gymnastics. Many of the country’s top gymnasts are former participants in the Junior Olympic program, including 2012 Olympic team champions Jordyn Wieber and Kyla Ross, 2009 World vault champion Kayla Williams, 2008 Olympic team silver-medalists Shawn Johnson and Samantha Peszek, and 2004 Olympic team silver-medalist Courtney McCool, to name a few. About the company: Head Over Heels Athletic Arts has been providing a positive athletic experience for children of the San Francisco Bay Area for 40 years. Its 22,000+ square-foot main facility and 7,000 sq. ft. preschool facility in Emeryville, Calif. makes them one of the largest non-profit athletic arts facilities in California. Head Over Heels Athletic Arts instills a lifelong love of being physically active through various gymnastics classes, including recreational gymnastics, gymnastics for special needs children, and competitive gymnastics as well as dance. Head Over Heels has been offering kids gymnastics programs to keep youngsters physically active since 1977.


News Article | April 17, 2017
Site: www.marketwired.com

First Ironworker Woman to Compete at District Level Wins Apprentice Competition at Local 44 CINCINNATI, OH--(Marketwired - April 11, 2017) - Ironworker apprentice Shakiyla Briana Phillips won the apprentice competition at the Iron Workers (IW) Local 44 defeating her male counterparts. She is the first female ironworker apprentice to compete at the district level. The Competition was held on April 7th from 8:00a.m. to 1:00p.m. at the IW Local 44 Training Center located at 1125 Victory Place, Hebron, Ky. "It felt good to show that we can all do it -- men and women alike; I was the only female and minority competitor and I worked hard to win the competition," said Shakiyla. "I'm proud of all of our apprentice competitors; they are my brothers and tough competition." "The guests were blown away by our young talent," said Dave Baker, business manager of Local 44. Apprentice competition included rigging, rod tying and the famous column climb. The competition took place after breakfast and a meet and greet at 8:00a.m. followed by lunch and the award ceremony at noon. The attendees had the rare and exciting opportunity to try their hands at welding using the virtual welder from Lincoln Electric. Many Greater Cincinnati Area business leaders and prominent law makers attended the event. State Representative Brigid Kelly was among the prominent lawmakers at the event. Local 44 is proud to host the annual competition that is also a great industry networking opportunity for the business community in the tri-state area. Above all, Local 44 is proud of Shakiyla Briana Phillips and the apprentice competitors. Iron Workers Local 44 consists of over 600 ironworkers within the tri-state area. They are building the necessary skills to provide local area businesses with the knowledge, safety and craftsmanship to help develop and maintain the tri-state area. The International Association of Bridge, Structural, Ornamental and Reinforcing Iron Workers or the Iron Workers (IW) represents 130,000 ironworkers in North America who work in construction on bridges; structural steel; ornamental, architectural, and miscellaneous metals; rebar; and in shops. Its mission is to improve the working conditions of its members while promoting constructive relationships with their employers to increase work opportunities.

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