Train Control Systems Laboratory

Transport, Japan

Train Control Systems Laboratory

Transport, Japan

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Iwata K.,Train Control Systems Laboratory
Quarterly Report of RTRI (Railway Technical Research Institute) | Year: 2013

A high level of safety is required for train control systems. It is important to apply all required safety measures to train control systems without any omissions. As many more functions are required in recent train control systems than before, it is necessary to divide the design phase into the conceptual design phase and the detailed design phase, in order to avoid system design complexity. In this paper, in order to conduct this appropriately, the template of safety requirements and a method of verifying the specifications of the system requirements with this template are proposed. The procedures are illustrated by applying the proposed method to CARAT (Computer And Radio Aided Train control system) as an example. Moreover, to apply this method efficiently, a support tool was built to verify safety requirements, and which displays safety verification items to be checked in the system requirement specifications automatically.


Kitano T.,Train Control Systems Laboratory | Sasaki T.,Train Control Systems Laboratory | Sugiyama Y.,Train Control Systems Laboratory
Quarterly Report of RTRI (Railway Technical Research Institute) | Year: 2015

This paper investigates a train control system design which can reduce the amount of signalling equipment required in a station. In this system, an on-board train positioning device detects the train position by using RFID tags on the sleeper. On-board interlocking equipment then commands the point machines in the closed-off block section in which the train is detected. This control mechanism operates using radio-communication. This system could therefore help reduce the amount of signalling equipment required in stations, such as wayside signals, interlocking machines and track circuits. In this paper, the authors report on the specifications of the system and on results from receiving tests with the RFID tag.


Yamamoto H.,Train Control Systems Laboratory | Sasaki T.,Train Control Systems Laboratory | Sugahara H.,Train Control Systems Laboratory
Quarterly Report of RTRI (Railway Technical Research Institute) (Japan) | Year: 2010

With a view to reducing the cost of on board positioning and speed detection equipment in train control systems using radio communications, for secondary lines, GPS positioning performance was investigated in the case where it is used in combination with MSAS (MTSAT Satellite-based Augmentation System). Results showed that it was possible when using this system to locate the vehicle on the track by using horizontal protection level, when on open track sections. Furthermore, tests carried out using only on board equipment show that it should be possible to build a system which does not rely on any ground installations.


Iwata K.,Train Control Systems Laboratory | Watanabe I.,Signalling and Telecommunications Technology Division
Quarterly Report of RTRI (Railway Technical Research Institute) (Japan) | Year: 2010

High-level safety is essential for railway signalling systems, and so various measures are taken to prevent failures susceptible to lead to accidents based on the fail-safe concept, given that the type of accident cause by such a system failure is potentially serious. An International Standard, stipulating levels of reliability, availability, maintainability and safety for railway signalling systems, has recently been introduced. In this kind of system, safety is of utmost importance. However, considering the current requirement for highlevel of availability, this paper presents a case study on a risk evaluation, based on costs per unit of time, which can be used to represent not only safety factors but also availability.

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