Medicinal Plant and Traditional Medicine Research and Development Center

Karanganyar, Indonesia

Medicinal Plant and Traditional Medicine Research and Development Center

Karanganyar, Indonesia
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Arung E.T.,Mulawarman University | Pasedan W.F.,Mulawarman University | Kusuma I.W.,Mulawarman University | Hendra M.,Mulawarman University | Supriadi M.B.,Medicinal Plant and Traditional Medicine Research and Development Center
Biodiversitas | Year: 2017

Based on community based research on ethnomedicine local knowledge and medicinal plant in Indonesia by Medicinal Plant and Traditional Medicine Research and Development Center of Indonesian Ministry of Helath in 2012 and 2015, various data on medicinal plants including for cosmetic in all Indonesia region has been collected. There are 38 medicinal plants use for skin care/cosmetics. This study focused on some selected medicinal plants used by several Dayak ethnic groups in East and North Kalimantan, Indonesia for cosmetic, especially for anti-acne. Four plants were selected for evaluating its property on anti-acne, namely Crotalaria pallida, Lepisanthes amoena, Premna corymbosa, and Vitex pinnata by well diffusion and dilution methods. The zone inhibition (mm) against Propionibacterium acnes of these leaves extract on anti-acne at 1000 μg/mL was 9.33; 16.44; 13.78; 11.00 mm, respectively and chlorampenicol (positive control) was 29.44 mm at 500 μg/mL. These results were in line with traditional used by Dayak tribes in East and North Kalimantan, Indonesia. © 2017, Society for Indonesian Biodiversity. All Rights Reserved.


Nugroho A.E.,Gadjah Mada University | Wijayanti A.,Gadjah Mada University | Mutmainah M.,Gadjah Mada University | Susilowati R.,Gadjah Mada University | Rahmawati N.,Medicinal Plant and Traditional Medicine Research and Development Center
Journal of Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine | Year: 2016

Licorice (Glycyrrhiza glabra), Pulasari stem bark (Alyxia reinwardtii) and Sembung leaf (Blumea balsamifera) are traditionally used to treat gastrointestinal disorders. The aim of the study was to investigate gastroprotective effect of hot water extracts combination of those herbal against aspirin-induced gastric ulcer model in rats. The combination consisted of fixed doses of Licorice 273 mg/kg BW and Sembung leaf 457.5 mg/kg BW, and also consisted of Pulasari stem in various doses i.e. 100 mg/kg BW (first group), 200 mg/kg BW (second and sixth group) and 300 mg/kg BW (third group). The fourth grup rats received sucralfate 360 mg/kg BW. Ten minute after seven consecutive days of drug administration, the rats were induced with aspirin 450 mg/kg BW except sixth group rats. The fifth group rats only received aspirin without any protective agents. The number and area of gastric ulcers were evaluated macroscopically. Whereas, histopatological observation was used for evaluation of mucosal damage score, and the number of eosinophils and mast cells. In the study, herbal extracts combination markedly exhibited protective effects indicated by less number and smaller area of gastric ulcers in comparison to those of aspirin group (P < 0.05). The score of mucosal damages were also decreased in herbal extracts combination groups. The number of eosinophils and mast cells of herbal combination groups were observed to be smaller than those of aspirin group (P < 0.05). In conclusion, herbal combination of Licorice (Glycyrrhiza glabra), Pulasari stem bark (Alyxia reinwardtii) and Sembung leaf (Blumea balsamifera) is potential to develop as a gastroprotective agent. © 2016, © The Author(s) 2016.


Mutmainah,Gadjah Mada University | Susilowati R.,Gadjah Mada University | Rahmawati N.,Medicinal Plant and Traditional Medicine Research and Development Center | Nugroho A.E.,Gadjah Mada University
Asian Pacific Journal of Tropical Biomedicine | Year: 2014

Objective: To investigate the protective effect of the combination of turmeric (Curcuma domestica), cardamom pods (Amomum compactum) and sembung leaf (Blumea balsamifera) on gastric mucosa in aspirin-induced gastric ulcer model rats. Methods: Thirty male Wistar rats weighing 150-200 g were divided into 6 groups. Four groups were administered with the hot water extracts combination consisted of cardamom pods 36.6 mg/200 g body weight and sembung leaf 91.5 mg/200 g body weight (fixed doses). The herbal extracts combination were also consisted of turmeric in various doses i.e. 10 mg/200 g body weight in the second group, 30 mg/200 g body weight in the first and third groups, and 50 mg/200 g body weight in the fourth group. The fifth group rats received sucralfate 72 mg /200 g body weight. Ten minutes after receiving herbal extracts combinations or sucralfate, the rats were induced with aspirin 90 mg/200 g body weight except the first group. Another group (sixth group) only received aspirin without any protective agent. All treatments were adsministered orally for seven days. The number and area of the gastric ulcers were counted and measured macroscopically. Score of mucosal damage and the number of eosinophils as well as the number of mast cells were observed in paraffin sections stained with hematoxylin eosin and toluidine blue, respectively. Results: The groups receiving herbal infuse combination exhibited less number and smaller area of gastric ulcers as well as smaller score of mucosal damage in comparison to those of aspirin group (P < 0.05). The number of mast cells and eosinophil of herbal groups were also smaller than that of aspirin group. Conclusions: The herbal extracts combination of turmeric (Curcuma domestica), cardamom pods (Amomum compactum) and sembung leaf (Blumea balsamifera) has potential gastroprotective effects. © 2014 by the Asian Pacific Journal of Tropical Biomedicine.


PubMed | Gadjah Mada University and Medicinal Plant and Traditional Medicine Research and Development Center
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Asian Pacific journal of tropical biomedicine | Year: 2014

To investigate the protective effect of the combination of turmeric (Curcuma domestica), cardamom pods (Amomum compactum) and sembung leaf (Blumea balsamifera) on gastric mucosa in aspirin-induced gastric ulcer model rats.Thirty male Wistar rats weighing 150-200 g were divided into 6 groups. Four groups were administered with the hot water extracts combination consisted of cardamom pods 36.6 mg/200 g body weight and sembung leaf 91.5 mg/200 g body weight (fixed doses). The herbal extracts combination were also consisted of turmeric in various doses i.e. 10 mg/200 g body weight in the second group, 30 mg/200 g body weight in the first and third groups, and 50 mg/200 g body weight in the fourth group. The fifth group rats received sucralfate 72 mg /200 g body weight. Ten minutes after receiving herbal extracts combinations or sucralfate, the rats were induced with aspirin 90 mg/200 g body weight except the first group. Another group (sixth group) only received aspirin without any protective agent. All treatments were adsministered orally for seven days. The number and area of the gastric ulcers were counted and measured macroscopically. Score of mucosal damage and the number of eosinophils as well as the number of mast cells were observed in paraffin sections stained with hematoxylin eosin and toluidine blue, respectively.The groups receiving herbal infuse combination exhibited less number and smaller area of gastric ulcers as well as smaller score of mucosal damage in comparison to those of aspirin group (P<0.05). The number of mast cells and eosinophil of herbal groups were also smaller than that of aspirin group.The herbal extracts combination of turmeric (Curcuma domestica), cardamom pods (Amomum compactum) and sembung leaf (Blumea balsamifera) has potential gastroprotective effects.


PubMed | Gadjah Mada University and Medicinal Plant and Traditional Medicine Research and Development Center
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Journal of evidence-based complementary & alternative medicine | Year: 2016

Licorice (Glycyrrhiza glabra), Pulasari stem bark (Alyxia reinwardtii) and Sembung leaf (Blumea balsamifera) are traditionally used to treat gastrointestinal disorders. The aim of the study was to investigate gastroprotective effect of hot water extracts combination of those herbal against aspirin-induced gastric ulcer model in rats. The combination consisted of fixed doses of Licorice 273 mg/kg BW and Sembung leaf 457.5 mg/kg BW, and also consisted of Pulasari stem in various doses i.e. 100 mg/kg BW (first group), 200 mg/kg BW (second and sixth group) and 300 mg/kg BW (third group). The fourth grup rats received sucralfate 360 mg/kg BW. Ten minute after seven consecutive days of drug administration, the rats were induced with aspirin 450 mg/kg BW except sixth group rats. The fifth group rats only received aspirin without any protective agents. The number and area of gastric ulcers were evaluated macroscopically. Whereas, histopatological observation was used for evaluation of mucosal damage score, and the number of eosinophils and mast cells. In the study, herbal extracts combination markedly exhibited protective effects indicated by less number and smaller area of gastric ulcers in comparison to those of aspirin group (P < 0.05). The score of mucosal damages were also decreased in herbal extracts combination groups. The number of eosinophils and mast cells of herbal combination groups were observed to be smaller than those of aspirin group (P < 0.05). In conclusion, herbal combination of Licorice (Glycyrrhiza glabra), Pulasari stem bark (Alyxia reinwardtii) and Sembung leaf (Blumea balsamifera) is potential to develop as a gastroprotective agent.

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