Toulouse, France
Toulouse, France

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Ainaoui N.,TRADGENE | Hantelys F.,TRADGENE | Renaud-Gabardos E.,TRADGENE | Bunel M.,TRADGENE | And 9 more authors.
PLoS ONE | Year: 2015

Fibroblast growth factor 1 (FGF1) is induced during myoblast differentiation at both transcriptional and translational levels. Here, we identify hnRNPM and p54nrb/NONO present in protein complexes bound to the FGF1 promoter and to the mRNA internal ribosome entry site (IRES). Knockdown or overexpression of these proteins indicate that they cooperate in activating IRES-dependent translation during myoblast differentiation, in a promoter-dependent manner. Importantly, mRNA transfection and promoter deletion experiments clearly demonstrate the impact of the FGF1 promoter on the activation of IRES-dependent translation via p54nrb and hnRNPM. Accordingly, knockdown of either p54 or hnRNPM also blocks endogenous FGF1 induction and myotube formation, demonstrating the physiological relevance of this mechanism and the role of these two proteins in myogenesis. Our study demonstrates the cooperative function of hnRNPM and p54nrb as regulators of IRES-dependent translation and indicates the involvement of a promoter-dependent mechanism. © 2015 Ainaoui et al.


PubMed | French National Center for Scientific Research, French Institute of Health and Medical Research and TRADGENE
Type: Journal Article | Journal: PloS one | Year: 2015

Fibroblast growth factor 1 (FGF1) is induced during myoblast differentiation at both transcriptional and translational levels. Here, we identify hnRNPM and p54nrb/NONO present in protein complexes bound to the FGF1 promoter and to the mRNA internal ribosome entry site (IRES). Knockdown or overexpression of these proteins indicate that they cooperate in activating IRES-dependent translation during myoblast differentiation, in a promoter-dependent manner. Importantly, mRNA transfection and promoter deletion experiments clearly demonstrate the impact of the FGF1 promoter on the activation of IRES-dependent translation via p54nrb and hnRNPM. Accordingly, knockdown of either p54 or hnRNPM also blocks endogenous FGF1 induction and myotube formation, demonstrating the physiological relevance of this mechanism and the role of these two proteins in myogenesis. Our study demonstrates the cooperative function of hnRNPM and p54nrb as regulators of IRES-dependent translation and indicates the involvement of a promoter-dependent mechanism.


PubMed | French Institute of Health and Medical Research and TRADGENE
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Molecular & cellular oncology | Year: 2016

Hypoxia is a major condition for the induction of angiogenesis during tumor development but its role in lymphangiogenesis remains unclear. Blood and lymphatic vasculatures are stimulated by growth factors from the vascular endothelial family: the VEGFs. In this review, we investigate the role of hypoxia in the molecular regulation of synthesis of lymphangiogenic growth factors VEGF-A, VEGF-C, and VEGF-D. Gene expression can be regulated at transcriptional and translational levels by hypoxia. Despite strong regulation of DNA transcription induced by hypoxia-inducible factors (HIFs), the majority of cellular stresses such as hypoxia lead to inhibition of cap-dependent translation of the mRNA, resulting in downregulation of protein synthesis. Here, we describe how translation initiation of VEGF mRNAs is induced by hypoxia through an internal ribosome entry site (IRES)-dependent mechanism. Considering the implication of the lymphatic vasculature in metastatic dissemination, it seems crucial to understand the hypoxia-induced molecular regulation of lymphangiogenic growth factors to obtain new insights for cancer therapy.

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