Toyama College

Toyama-shi, Japan

Toyama College

Toyama-shi, Japan
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Tsuneki H.,University of Toyama | Tokai E.,University of Toyama | Suzuki T.,University of Toyama | Seki T.,University of Toyama | And 6 more authors.
European Journal of Pharmacology | Year: 2013

Angiotensin II is the major effector in the renin-angiotensin system, and angiotensin II-induced oxidative stress and endothelial dysfunction are profoundly implicated in the pathogenesis of hypertension and cardiovascular disease. In the present study, we investigated the effect of an antioxidant reagent, coenzyme Q10, on angiotensin II-induced oxidative stress in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) to assess its potential usefulness for antioxidant therapy. Treatment of HUVEC with coenzyme Q 10 (1-10 μM) increased its intracellular levels in a concentration-dependent manner. Coenzyme Q10 (10 μM) prevented the actions of angiotensin II (100 nM): overproduction of reactive oxygen species, increases in expression of p22phox and Nox2 subunits of NADPH oxidase, and inhibition of insulin-induced nitric oxide production. In addition, coenzyme Q10 prevented angiotensin II-induced upregulation of intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1) and vascular cell adhesion molecule 1 (VCAM-1) in HUVEC, and inhibited their adhesion to U937 monocytic cells. Moreover, treatment of HUVEC with coenzyme Q10 effectively ameliorated angiotensin II-induced increases in expression of Nox2 subunit of NADPH oxidase, ICAM-1, and VCAM-1. These results provide the first in vitro evidence that coenzyme Q10 is an efficient antioxidant reagent to improve angiotensin II-induced oxidative stress and endothelial dysfunction, possibly relevant to the causes of cardiovascular disease. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.


Harada K.H.,Kyoto University | Niisoe T.,Kyoto University | Imanaka M.,Kyoto University | Takahashi T.,Kyoto University | And 29 more authors.
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America | Year: 2014

Radiation dose rates were evaluated in three areas neighboring a restricted area within a 20- to 50-km radius of the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant in August-September 2012 and projected to 2022 and 2062. Study participants wore personal dosimeters measuring external dose equivalents, almost entirely from deposited radionuclides (groundshine). External dose rate equivalents owing to the accident averaged 1.03, 2.75, and 1.66 mSv/y in the village of Kawauchi, the Tamano area of Soma, and the Haramachi area of Minamisoma, respectively. Internal dose rates estimated from dietary intake of radiocesium averaged 0.0058, 0.019, and 0.0088 mSv/y in Kawauchi, Tamano, and Haramachi, respectively. Dose rates from inhalation of resuspended radiocesium were lower than 0.001 mSv/y. In 2012, the average annual doses from radiocesium were close to the average background radiation exposure (2 mSv/y) in Japan. Accounting only for the physical decay of radiocesium, mean annual dose rates in 2022 were estimated as 0.31, 0.87, and 0.53 mSv/y in Kawauchi, Tamano, and Haramachi, respectively. The simple and conservative estimates are comparable with variations in the background dose, and unlikely to exceed the ordinary permissible dose rate (1 mSv/y) for the majority of the Fukushima population. Health risk assessment indicates that post-2012 doses will increase lifetime solid cancer, leukemia, and breast cancer incidences by 1.06%, 0.03% and 0.28% respectively, in Tamano. This assessment was derived from short-term observation with uncertainties and did not evaluate the firstyear dose and radioiodine exposure. Nevertheless, this estimate provides perspective on the long-term radiation exposure levels in the three regions.


Ochiai M.,Kagawa University | Fujii K.,Kagawa University | Takeuchi H.,Toyama College | Matsuo T.,Kagawa University
Journal of Oleo Science | Year: 2013

Dietary intake of high trans-fatty acids (TFAs) is well known to increase the risk of cardiovascular diseases. However, few reports demonstrated definitive relationships between dietary TFAs and obesity. In addition, the difference in the gastrointestinal absorption rate of TFAs containing oil from that of cis-FAs containing oil was not taken into consideration in many rat studies. In experiment A, we investigated the difference in the apparent absorption rate of TFAs containing oil from control oil. Hydrogenated rapeseed oil and a mixture of camellia oil and tristearin (90:10 [w/w]) were used as TFA-containing test oil and control oil, respectively. Ten Wistar rats were divided into the control group or TFA group, and fed the respective diet containing the control oil or the test oil for 1 week. The apparent absorption rates of these oils were measured by fecal fat excretion rate and dietary fat intake. The results showed a significantly lower gastrointestinal apparent absorption rate of the test oil (93.1%) than that of the control oil (96.2%). In consideration of the apparent absorption rate of these dietary oils, the effects of dietary TFAs on body fat accumulation and energy metabolism were investigated in rats. Twenty-eight Wistar rats were divided into the control group or the TFA group. Each group received an isoenergetic diet containing the control oil or the test oil for 8 weeks. Pre-and postprandial metabolic rates were measured between weeks 7 and 8. The test oil-based diet did not significantly influence body weight gain, fat accumulation, and metabolic rate. In contrast, liver weight, hepatic triglyceride content, and serum non-high density lipoprotein (HDL)-cholesterol (CHO)/HDL-CHO ratio were significantly higher in the TFA group than in the control group. In conclusion, these findings suggest that dietary TFAs did not influence body fat accumulation but increased the levels of risk markers of cardiovascular diseases. © 2013 by Japan Oil Chemists' Society.


Takeuchi H.,Toyama College | Kutsuwada T.,Toyama College | Shirokawa Y.,Toyama College | Harada S.,Toyama College | Sugano M.,Kyushu University
Bioscience, Biotechnology and Biochemistry | Year: 2013

The World Health Organization (WHO) has recommended that trans fatty acid (TFA) intake should be less than 1% of total energy intake, but few data are available as to the influence of energy TFA intake of as low as 1% on blood cholesterol levels. A randomized, double-blind, parallel trial was conducted to assess the effects of 1% TFA dietary supplementation on serum cholesterol levels in healthy young women. Sixty-five volunteers consumed cookies containing 1% (TFA) or 0.04% (control) energy of TFA for 4 weeks and blood was harvested after overnight fasting. There were no significant differences in serum LDL- or HDL-cholesterol levels between the two groups. The hemoglobin A1c level was not influenced by dietary TFA. These results suggest that energy of TFAs at less than 1% has little effect on serum cholesterol or hemoglobin A1c levels in healthy young women. This confirms the correctness of the WHO recommendation.


Takeuchi H.,Toyama College | Yamaki M.,Toyama College | Hirose K.,Toyama College | Hienae C.,Toyama College | And 2 more authors.
Bioscience, Biotechnology and Biochemistry | Year: 2011

A randomized crossover study in healthy young Japanese showed no significant effects of a 0.6% energy trans fatty acid (TFA) intake on the serum cholesterol concentrations and parameters of glucose metabolism. The results indicate that TFAs at this dietary level may have no adverse metabolic effects on healthy young Japanese.


Maeda Y.,Niigata University | Konishi T.,Toyama College
Assistive Technology Research Series | Year: 2011

This paper describes a series of trials based on mathematical information engineering that were designed to enable assistive technologies to help with the travel and mobility of the visually impaired. In order for technology to be of assistance to travel, two different concepts are necessary, i.e., to assist travel performance and to assist travel planning. In the former case, we developed a GPS-based "travel assist" system (TAS) so that an adaptive fuzzy inference neural network could be employed to stabilize positional guidance. In many cities and towns in Japan it is often the case that an area of buildings surrounding a particular street rather than the street itself assumes the identity of a recognized landmark. Therefore, GPS measurements acquired by a pedestrian walking on such a street are likely to randomly output landmarks on both sides of the street. The adaptive fuzzy inference neural network enabled the TAS to guide the user to just the landmark that was required by the pedestrian. In the latter case, we developed an AHP-based "plan assist" system (PAS), whereby the system assists in the self-determination of the route selection. These concepts are of special importance to visually impaired persons, even those with guide helpers, because such self-determination might enhance their efficacy when traveling, and, as a result, might add to the self-sufficiency of the visually impaired. © 2011 The authors and IOS Press. All rights reserved.


Takeuchi H.,Toyama College | Ito E.,Toyama College | Tomioka T.,Toyama College | Tabuchi E.,Toyama College | And 2 more authors.
Bioscience, Biotechnology and Biochemistry | Year: 2012

There are very limited data concerning the influence of low-level trans fatty acid (TFA) intake on blood lipid levels. In this study, correlation of total and diene TFA intake with serum cholesterol levels was studied in young Japanese women. The mean intakes of total and diene TFAs were 0.36% and 0.05% of energy, respectively. There was a significant correlation between total fat intake and TFA intake. TFA intake was significantly correlated with erythrocyte TFA content. Total TFA intake was not correlated with total, LDL- or HDLcholesterol levels. No correlatuon was found between diene TFA intake and cholesterol level. Total and diene TFA intake were not correlated with hemoglobin A1c or C-reactive protein levels. These results suggest that the average TFA intake of young Japanese women does not adversely affect serum cholesterol levels.


Takeuchi H.,Toyama College | Nishimura Y.,Toyama College | Ohmori A.,Toyama College | Tabuchi E.,Toyama College
Journal of Nutritional Science and Vitaminology | Year: 2015

The excessive intake of trans fatty acids (TFAs) increases serum LDL-cholesterol and reduces HDL-cholesterol. Limited data exist regarding the low-level intake of TFAs, and the tolerable upper-limit level remains to be fully elucidated. A randomized, double-blind, parallel trial was conducted to assess the effects of a low level of TFA supplementation on serum cholesterol levels in healthy adult Japanese women. The volunteers who participated in this examination took in approximately 0.4% of energy (%E) TFAs from daily meals. Fifty-one volunteers consumed one cookie containing 0.6%E (TFA) or 0.04%E (control) of TFAs every day for 4 wk, and blood was harvested after overnight fasting. The mean TFA intakes of the control and TFA groups during the experimental period were 0.4%E and 1.1%E, respectively. There were no significant differences in serum total, LDL- or HDL-cholesterol levels between the control and TFA groups. The serum glucose and insulin levels were not influenced by TFA supplementation. These results confirm that dietary supplementation with 0.6%E TFAs (a total TFA intake of approximately 1%E) would have little effect on serum cholesterol levels in healthy adult Japanese women. © 2015, Center for Academic Publications Japan. All rights reserved.


PubMed | Toyama College
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Journal of nutritional science and vitaminology | Year: 2015

The excessive intake of trans fatty acids (TFAs) increases serum LDL-cholesterol and reduces HDL-cholesterol. Limited data exist regarding the low-level intake of TFAs, and the tolerable upper-limit level remains to be fully elucidated. A randomized, double-blind, parallel trial was conducted to assess the effects of a low level of TFA supplementation on serum cholesterol levels in healthy adult Japanese women. The volunteers who participated in this examination took in approximately 0.4% of energy (%E) TFAs from daily meals. Fifty-one volunteers consumed one cookie containing 0.6%E (TFA) or 0.04%E (control) of TFAs every day for 4 wk, and blood was harvested after overnight fasting. The mean TFA intakes of the control and TFA groups during the experimental period were 0.4%E and 1.1%E, respectively. There were no significant differences in serum total, LDL- or HDL-cholesterol levels between the control and TFA groups. The serum glucose and insulin levels were not influenced by TFA supplementation. These results confirm that dietary supplementation with 0.6%E TFAs (a total TFA intake of approximately 1%E) would have little effect on serum cholesterol levels in healthy adult Japanese women.


PubMed | Toyama College
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Bioscience, biotechnology, and biochemistry | Year: 2013

The World Health Organization (WHO) has recommended that trans fatty acid (TFA) intake should be less than 1% of total energy intake, but few data are available as to the influence of energy TFA intake of as low as 1% on blood cholesterol levels. A randomized, double-blind, parallel trial was conducted to assess the effects of 1% TFA dietary supplementation on serum cholesterol levels in healthy young women. Sixty-five volunteers consumed cookies containing 1% (TFA) or 0.04% (control) energy of TFA for 4 weeks and blood was harvested after overnight fasting. There were no significant differences in serum LDL- or HDL-cholesterol levels between the two groups. The hemoglobin A1c level was not influenced by dietary TFA. These results suggest that energy of TFAs at less than 1% has little effect on serum cholesterol or hemoglobin A1c levels in healthy young women. This confirms the correctness of the WHO recommendation.

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