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Grange-over-Sands, United Kingdom

The centenary of the First World War is now upon us and with this in mind a brief review of military radiology before and during WWI is given. In early 1896, very soon after the discovery of X-rays by Wilhelm Conrad Röntgen in Würzburg on 8 November 1895, many radiographs were published in books and journals showing bony fractures, and also foreign bodies embedded in skulls, hands, arms, legs and feet. Several of these cases related to injuries caused during warfare and the earliest textbooks always made some mention of the applications of the new rays in warfare. Descriptions are given of some of the early X-ray apparatus used in warfare and practical experiences such as the difficulty of setting up facilities for developing X-ray films and the difficulty of obtaining electrical power for the apparatus. Military radiology in the Boer War in South Africa, 1899-1902, was the first to be very well documented in medical journals. By the time of WWI motor vehicles specially designed for deployment just behind the battle front so that radiology services would be available as quickly as possible. These were used by most of the combatant countries, including Belgium, France, Germany, Japan, the United Kingdom and the USA. These mobile X-ray ambulances included the so-called Little Curies used by Marie Sklodowska Curie, who with her daughter Irène acting as her assistant also taught military radiology to technicians in the American army. © Polskie Towarzystwo Onkologiczne. Source


This chronology is a selection of important events in the history of medicine which are directly or indirectly related to neoplastic disease. The reason underlying its compilation is that relatively few chronologies concerning oncology have previously been published and those that do exist do not always quote references or provide the dates of birth and death of the physicians, surgeons and scientists mentioned. It is hoped that this selected chronology will be of help to those writing in depth about the history of medicine and in particular about cancer. © 2013, Polskie Towarzystwo Onkologiczne. Source


This chronology is a selection of important events in the history of medicine which are directly or indirectly related to neoplastic disease. The reason underlying its compilation is that relatively few chronologies concerning oncology have previously been published and those that do exist do not always quote references or provide the dates of birth and death of the physicians, surgeons and scientists mentioned. It is hoped that this selected chronology will be of help to those writing in depth about the history of medicine and in particular about cancer. © Polskie Towarzystwo Onkologiczne. Source


This paper reproduces a report on the status of the discovery, processing and clinical/experimental use of radium during the decade following its discovery in 1898. It is a report by an American journalist F. Harvey Middleton and first appeared in the pages of a 1908 issue of the Technical World Magazine: a popular scientific magazine of the late 19 th and early 20 th centuries for the general public. Middleton describes a visit to the factory of Armet de Lisle: the only such report from any journalist of the first decade of the 20 th century. No references were quoted by Middleton and those listed in this paper are the result of library searches to correlate with some of Middleton's statements. Source


This chronology is a selection of important events in the history of medicine which are directly or indirectly related to neoplastic disease. The reason underlying its compilation is that relatively few chronologies concerning oncology have previously been published and those that do exist do not always quote references or provide the dates of birth and death of the physicians, surgeons and scientists mentioned. It is hoped that this selected chronology will be of help to those writing in depth about the history of medicine and in particular about cancer. © Polskie Towarzystwo Onkologiczne. Source

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