Touro University Nevada

Henderson, NV, United States

Touro University Nevada

Henderson, NV, United States
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LAS VEGAS, June 07, 2017 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- In mid-May Nevada lawmakers passed bill AB135 and Nevada Governor Brian Sandoval signed, creating a new law that will change the standard for DUI testing for marijuana impairment thanks to the dedication and hard work of two medical students. Graham Lambert and Charles Cullison, Touro University Nevada medical students, provided integral research and information to lawmakers to change from urine testing to blood testing as the primary assessment for those thought to be driving under the influence of marijuana. Lambert, a former Petty Officer and Avionics Specialist in the United States Navy and Cullison, a native Nevadan, recently completed their second year of medical school and will soon begin clinical rotations as third-year students. Both are pursuing their medical education as part of the military’s Health Professions Scholarship Program and will be commissioned as active duty officers at the end of their medical training. During a medical jurisprudence class, the two students seized the opportunity to perform research and enter the annual American College of Legal Medicine (ACLM) poster competition. Lambert and Cullison worked diligently to research the laboratory testing methodology evaluating cognitive impairment while operating a motor vehicle under the influence of marijuana. Their research and recommendation that Nevada adopt a blood test for marijuana impairment while driving a motor vehicle earned the first place award for best poster at ACLM’s national competition. Lambert explains, “Our research focused on the testing methods used to presume cognitive impairment from marijuana use, as it pertains to Nevada Revised Statute 484C.110.  We found urinalysis testing for the presence of THC-COOH to be entirely inappropriate; these tests should be replaced with a blood test only, for delta-9-THC and 11-OH-THC.  This project was a meta-analysis of multiple peer-reviewed research articles, medical toxicology texts, and lectures, as well as interviewing the toxicology labs of the Henderson Police Department, Las Vegas Metropolitan Police Department and Washoe County’s Sheriff’s Office.” The research led to the conclusion that Nevada Revised Statutes, NRS 484C.110, governing marijuana and marijuana metabolite urine testing was inconsistent with sound, accepted science.  Nevada Assemblyman Steve Yeager learned of the students’ research and it prompted his introduction of AB135 in the 2017 Nevada Legislative session. Both students testified in Carson City and in Las Vegas to the Legislative Judiciary Committees. The bill won the support of many interested parties, including the Nevada District Attorneys Association and the Nevada Public Defenders Association. “Testifying before both the Nevada Assembly and Senate Judiciary Committees was an exciting experience for both of us,” said Cullison. “We will never forget the experience of working with Assemblyman Steve Yeager. He understood our message from day one and made sure we were included in every step of the process, from bill drafting to the bill signing.” AB135 passed both Houses of the Legislature and was signed into law by Governor Sandoval who hosted the two students at the signing ceremony in the Governor’s Office in Carson City. The bill passage came just weeks before recreational marijuana becomes available for sale in Nevada. Barring any delays, up to one ounce of marijuana can be legally sold for recreational use in Nevada for the first time beginning on July 1 to those 21 and older as a result of Question 2 passing in the fall of 2016. Even though possession of marijuana became legal Jan. 1, businesses did not have approval to sell recreational marijuana. “We are very proud of what Graham and Charles have accomplished with their research,” said Dr. John Dougherty, Dean of Touro’s College of Osteopathic Medicine. “Touro University Nevada encourages students to address health policy issues and dedicate themselves to making a positive impact. It is an important opportunity for them to learn that evidence based medicine can influence legislation such as this and has the potential to create positive change not only in Nevada but nationwide.” About Touro University Nevada Touro University Nevada (TUN) is a private, non-profit, Jewish-sponsored institution established to help address critical needs in health care and education and as a resource for community service in the state of Nevada. TUN opened its doors in 2004 and is now home to nearly 1,400 students, in a wide variety of degree programs including osteopathic medicine, physician assistant studies, education, nursing, occupational therapy and physical therapy. The university’s Henderson campus includes a multi-specialty health center and a multi-disciplinary Center for Autism and Developmental Disabilities. For more information on TUN, please visit www.tun.touro.edu or call 702- 777-8687.


LAS VEGAS, June 07, 2017 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- In mid-May Nevada lawmakers passed bill AB135 and Nevada Governor Brian Sandoval signed, creating a new law that will change the standard for DUI testing for marijuana impairment thanks to the dedication and hard work of two medical students. Graham Lambert and Charles Cullison, Touro University Nevada medical students, provided integral research and information to lawmakers to change from urine testing to blood testing as the primary assessment for those thought to be driving under the influence of marijuana. Lambert, a former Petty Officer and Avionics Specialist in the United States Navy and Cullison, a native Nevadan, recently completed their second year of medical school and will soon begin clinical rotations as third-year students. Both are pursuing their medical education as part of the military’s Health Professions Scholarship Program and will be commissioned as active duty officers at the end of their medical training. During a medical jurisprudence class, the two students seized the opportunity to perform research and enter the annual American College of Legal Medicine (ACLM) poster competition. Lambert and Cullison worked diligently to research the laboratory testing methodology evaluating cognitive impairment while operating a motor vehicle under the influence of marijuana. Their research and recommendation that Nevada adopt a blood test for marijuana impairment while driving a motor vehicle earned the first place award for best poster at ACLM’s national competition. Lambert explains, “Our research focused on the testing methods used to presume cognitive impairment from marijuana use, as it pertains to Nevada Revised Statute 484C.110.  We found urinalysis testing for the presence of THC-COOH to be entirely inappropriate; these tests should be replaced with a blood test only, for delta-9-THC and 11-OH-THC.  This project was a meta-analysis of multiple peer-reviewed research articles, medical toxicology texts, and lectures, as well as interviewing the toxicology labs of the Henderson Police Department, Las Vegas Metropolitan Police Department and Washoe County’s Sheriff’s Office.” The research led to the conclusion that Nevada Revised Statutes, NRS 484C.110, governing marijuana and marijuana metabolite urine testing was inconsistent with sound, accepted science.  Nevada Assemblyman Steve Yeager learned of the students’ research and it prompted his introduction of AB135 in the 2017 Nevada Legislative session. Both students testified in Carson City and in Las Vegas to the Legislative Judiciary Committees. The bill won the support of many interested parties, including the Nevada District Attorneys Association and the Nevada Public Defenders Association. “Testifying before both the Nevada Assembly and Senate Judiciary Committees was an exciting experience for both of us,” said Cullison. “We will never forget the experience of working with Assemblyman Steve Yeager. He understood our message from day one and made sure we were included in every step of the process, from bill drafting to the bill signing.” AB135 passed both Houses of the Legislature and was signed into law by Governor Sandoval who hosted the two students at the signing ceremony in the Governor’s Office in Carson City. The bill passage came just weeks before recreational marijuana becomes available for sale in Nevada. Barring any delays, up to one ounce of marijuana can be legally sold for recreational use in Nevada for the first time beginning on July 1 to those 21 and older as a result of Question 2 passing in the fall of 2016. Even though possession of marijuana became legal Jan. 1, businesses did not have approval to sell recreational marijuana. “We are very proud of what Graham and Charles have accomplished with their research,” said Dr. John Dougherty, Dean of Touro’s College of Osteopathic Medicine. “Touro University Nevada encourages students to address health policy issues and dedicate themselves to making a positive impact. It is an important opportunity for them to learn that evidence based medicine can influence legislation such as this and has the potential to create positive change not only in Nevada but nationwide.” About Touro University Nevada Touro University Nevada (TUN) is a private, non-profit, Jewish-sponsored institution established to help address critical needs in health care and education and as a resource for community service in the state of Nevada. TUN opened its doors in 2004 and is now home to nearly 1,400 students, in a wide variety of degree programs including osteopathic medicine, physician assistant studies, education, nursing, occupational therapy and physical therapy. The university’s Henderson campus includes a multi-specialty health center and a multi-disciplinary Center for Autism and Developmental Disabilities. For more information on TUN, please visit www.tun.touro.edu or call 702- 777-8687.


LAS VEGAS, June 07, 2017 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- In mid-May Nevada lawmakers passed bill AB135 and Nevada Governor Brian Sandoval signed, creating a new law that will change the standard for DUI testing for marijuana impairment thanks to the dedication and hard work of two medical students. Graham Lambert and Charles Cullison, Touro University Nevada medical students, provided integral research and information to lawmakers to change from urine testing to blood testing as the primary assessment for those thought to be driving under the influence of marijuana. Lambert, a former Petty Officer and Avionics Specialist in the United States Navy and Cullison, a native Nevadan, recently completed their second year of medical school and will soon begin clinical rotations as third-year students. Both are pursuing their medical education as part of the military’s Health Professions Scholarship Program and will be commissioned as active duty officers at the end of their medical training. During a medical jurisprudence class, the two students seized the opportunity to perform research and enter the annual American College of Legal Medicine (ACLM) poster competition. Lambert and Cullison worked diligently to research the laboratory testing methodology evaluating cognitive impairment while operating a motor vehicle under the influence of marijuana. Their research and recommendation that Nevada adopt a blood test for marijuana impairment while driving a motor vehicle earned the first place award for best poster at ACLM’s national competition. Lambert explains, “Our research focused on the testing methods used to presume cognitive impairment from marijuana use, as it pertains to Nevada Revised Statute 484C.110.  We found urinalysis testing for the presence of THC-COOH to be entirely inappropriate; these tests should be replaced with a blood test only, for delta-9-THC and 11-OH-THC.  This project was a meta-analysis of multiple peer-reviewed research articles, medical toxicology texts, and lectures, as well as interviewing the toxicology labs of the Henderson Police Department, Las Vegas Metropolitan Police Department and Washoe County’s Sheriff’s Office.” The research led to the conclusion that Nevada Revised Statutes, NRS 484C.110, governing marijuana and marijuana metabolite urine testing was inconsistent with sound, accepted science.  Nevada Assemblyman Steve Yeager learned of the students’ research and it prompted his introduction of AB135 in the 2017 Nevada Legislative session. Both students testified in Carson City and in Las Vegas to the Legislative Judiciary Committees. The bill won the support of many interested parties, including the Nevada District Attorneys Association and the Nevada Public Defenders Association. “Testifying before both the Nevada Assembly and Senate Judiciary Committees was an exciting experience for both of us,” said Cullison. “We will never forget the experience of working with Assemblyman Steve Yeager. He understood our message from day one and made sure we were included in every step of the process, from bill drafting to the bill signing.” AB135 passed both Houses of the Legislature and was signed into law by Governor Sandoval who hosted the two students at the signing ceremony in the Governor’s Office in Carson City. The bill passage came just weeks before recreational marijuana becomes available for sale in Nevada. Barring any delays, up to one ounce of marijuana can be legally sold for recreational use in Nevada for the first time beginning on July 1 to those 21 and older as a result of Question 2 passing in the fall of 2016. Even though possession of marijuana became legal Jan. 1, businesses did not have approval to sell recreational marijuana. “We are very proud of what Graham and Charles have accomplished with their research,” said Dr. John Dougherty, Dean of Touro’s College of Osteopathic Medicine. “Touro University Nevada encourages students to address health policy issues and dedicate themselves to making a positive impact. It is an important opportunity for them to learn that evidence based medicine can influence legislation such as this and has the potential to create positive change not only in Nevada but nationwide.” About Touro University Nevada Touro University Nevada (TUN) is a private, non-profit, Jewish-sponsored institution established to help address critical needs in health care and education and as a resource for community service in the state of Nevada. TUN opened its doors in 2004 and is now home to nearly 1,400 students, in a wide variety of degree programs including osteopathic medicine, physician assistant studies, education, nursing, occupational therapy and physical therapy. The university’s Henderson campus includes a multi-specialty health center and a multi-disciplinary Center for Autism and Developmental Disabilities. For more information on TUN, please visit www.tun.touro.edu or call 702- 777-8687.


LAS VEGAS, June 07, 2017 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- In mid-May Nevada lawmakers passed bill AB135 and Nevada Governor Brian Sandoval signed, creating a new law that will change the standard for DUI testing for marijuana impairment thanks to the dedication and hard work of two medical students. Graham Lambert and Charles Cullison, Touro University Nevada medical students, provided integral research and information to lawmakers to change from urine testing to blood testing as the primary assessment for those thought to be driving under the influence of marijuana. Lambert, a former Petty Officer and Avionics Specialist in the United States Navy and Cullison, a native Nevadan, recently completed their second year of medical school and will soon begin clinical rotations as third-year students. Both are pursuing their medical education as part of the military’s Health Professions Scholarship Program and will be commissioned as active duty officers at the end of their medical training. During a medical jurisprudence class, the two students seized the opportunity to perform research and enter the annual American College of Legal Medicine (ACLM) poster competition. Lambert and Cullison worked diligently to research the laboratory testing methodology evaluating cognitive impairment while operating a motor vehicle under the influence of marijuana. Their research and recommendation that Nevada adopt a blood test for marijuana impairment while driving a motor vehicle earned the first place award for best poster at ACLM’s national competition. Lambert explains, “Our research focused on the testing methods used to presume cognitive impairment from marijuana use, as it pertains to Nevada Revised Statute 484C.110.  We found urinalysis testing for the presence of THC-COOH to be entirely inappropriate; these tests should be replaced with a blood test only, for delta-9-THC and 11-OH-THC.  This project was a meta-analysis of multiple peer-reviewed research articles, medical toxicology texts, and lectures, as well as interviewing the toxicology labs of the Henderson Police Department, Las Vegas Metropolitan Police Department and Washoe County’s Sheriff’s Office.” The research led to the conclusion that Nevada Revised Statutes, NRS 484C.110, governing marijuana and marijuana metabolite urine testing was inconsistent with sound, accepted science.  Nevada Assemblyman Steve Yeager learned of the students’ research and it prompted his introduction of AB135 in the 2017 Nevada Legislative session. Both students testified in Carson City and in Las Vegas to the Legislative Judiciary Committees. The bill won the support of many interested parties, including the Nevada District Attorneys Association and the Nevada Public Defenders Association. “Testifying before both the Nevada Assembly and Senate Judiciary Committees was an exciting experience for both of us,” said Cullison. “We will never forget the experience of working with Assemblyman Steve Yeager. He understood our message from day one and made sure we were included in every step of the process, from bill drafting to the bill signing.” AB135 passed both Houses of the Legislature and was signed into law by Governor Sandoval who hosted the two students at the signing ceremony in the Governor’s Office in Carson City. The bill passage came just weeks before recreational marijuana becomes available for sale in Nevada. Barring any delays, up to one ounce of marijuana can be legally sold for recreational use in Nevada for the first time beginning on July 1 to those 21 and older as a result of Question 2 passing in the fall of 2016. Even though possession of marijuana became legal Jan. 1, businesses did not have approval to sell recreational marijuana. “We are very proud of what Graham and Charles have accomplished with their research,” said Dr. John Dougherty, Dean of Touro’s College of Osteopathic Medicine. “Touro University Nevada encourages students to address health policy issues and dedicate themselves to making a positive impact. It is an important opportunity for them to learn that evidence based medicine can influence legislation such as this and has the potential to create positive change not only in Nevada but nationwide.” About Touro University Nevada Touro University Nevada (TUN) is a private, non-profit, Jewish-sponsored institution established to help address critical needs in health care and education and as a resource for community service in the state of Nevada. TUN opened its doors in 2004 and is now home to nearly 1,400 students, in a wide variety of degree programs including osteopathic medicine, physician assistant studies, education, nursing, occupational therapy and physical therapy. The university’s Henderson campus includes a multi-specialty health center and a multi-disciplinary Center for Autism and Developmental Disabilities. For more information on TUN, please visit www.tun.touro.edu or call 702- 777-8687.


LAS VEGAS, June 07, 2017 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- In mid-May Nevada lawmakers passed bill AB135 and Nevada Governor Brian Sandoval signed, creating a new law that will change the standard for DUI testing for marijuana impairment thanks to the dedication and hard work of two medical students. Graham Lambert and Charles Cullison, Touro University Nevada medical students, provided integral research and information to lawmakers to change from urine testing to blood testing as the primary assessment for those thought to be driving under the influence of marijuana. Lambert, a former Petty Officer and Avionics Specialist in the United States Navy and Cullison, a native Nevadan, recently completed their second year of medical school and will soon begin clinical rotations as third-year students. Both are pursuing their medical education as part of the military’s Health Professions Scholarship Program and will be commissioned as active duty officers at the end of their medical training. During a medical jurisprudence class, the two students seized the opportunity to perform research and enter the annual American College of Legal Medicine (ACLM) poster competition. Lambert and Cullison worked diligently to research the laboratory testing methodology evaluating cognitive impairment while operating a motor vehicle under the influence of marijuana. Their research and recommendation that Nevada adopt a blood test for marijuana impairment while driving a motor vehicle earned the first place award for best poster at ACLM’s national competition. Lambert explains, “Our research focused on the testing methods used to presume cognitive impairment from marijuana use, as it pertains to Nevada Revised Statute 484C.110.  We found urinalysis testing for the presence of THC-COOH to be entirely inappropriate; these tests should be replaced with a blood test only, for delta-9-THC and 11-OH-THC.  This project was a meta-analysis of multiple peer-reviewed research articles, medical toxicology texts, and lectures, as well as interviewing the toxicology labs of the Henderson Police Department, Las Vegas Metropolitan Police Department and Washoe County’s Sheriff’s Office.” The research led to the conclusion that Nevada Revised Statutes, NRS 484C.110, governing marijuana and marijuana metabolite urine testing was inconsistent with sound, accepted science.  Nevada Assemblyman Steve Yeager learned of the students’ research and it prompted his introduction of AB135 in the 2017 Nevada Legislative session. Both students testified in Carson City and in Las Vegas to the Legislative Judiciary Committees. The bill won the support of many interested parties, including the Nevada District Attorneys Association and the Nevada Public Defenders Association. “Testifying before both the Nevada Assembly and Senate Judiciary Committees was an exciting experience for both of us,” said Cullison. “We will never forget the experience of working with Assemblyman Steve Yeager. He understood our message from day one and made sure we were included in every step of the process, from bill drafting to the bill signing.” AB135 passed both Houses of the Legislature and was signed into law by Governor Sandoval who hosted the two students at the signing ceremony in the Governor’s Office in Carson City. The bill passage came just weeks before recreational marijuana becomes available for sale in Nevada. Barring any delays, up to one ounce of marijuana can be legally sold for recreational use in Nevada for the first time beginning on July 1 to those 21 and older as a result of Question 2 passing in the fall of 2016. Even though possession of marijuana became legal Jan. 1, businesses did not have approval to sell recreational marijuana. “We are very proud of what Graham and Charles have accomplished with their research,” said Dr. John Dougherty, Dean of Touro’s College of Osteopathic Medicine. “Touro University Nevada encourages students to address health policy issues and dedicate themselves to making a positive impact. It is an important opportunity for them to learn that evidence based medicine can influence legislation such as this and has the potential to create positive change not only in Nevada but nationwide.” About Touro University Nevada Touro University Nevada (TUN) is a private, non-profit, Jewish-sponsored institution established to help address critical needs in health care and education and as a resource for community service in the state of Nevada. TUN opened its doors in 2004 and is now home to nearly 1,400 students, in a wide variety of degree programs including osteopathic medicine, physician assistant studies, education, nursing, occupational therapy and physical therapy. The university’s Henderson campus includes a multi-specialty health center and a multi-disciplinary Center for Autism and Developmental Disabilities. For more information on TUN, please visit www.tun.touro.edu or call 702- 777-8687.


LAS VEGAS, June 07, 2017 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- In mid-May Nevada lawmakers passed bill AB135 and Nevada Governor Brian Sandoval signed, creating a new law that will change the standard for DUI testing for marijuana impairment thanks to the dedication and hard work of two medical students. Graham Lambert and Charles Cullison, Touro University Nevada medical students, provided integral research and information to lawmakers to change from urine testing to blood testing as the primary assessment for those thought to be driving under the influence of marijuana. Lambert, a former Petty Officer and Avionics Specialist in the United States Navy and Cullison, a native Nevadan, recently completed their second year of medical school and will soon begin clinical rotations as third-year students. Both are pursuing their medical education as part of the military’s Health Professions Scholarship Program and will be commissioned as active duty officers at the end of their medical training. During a medical jurisprudence class, the two students seized the opportunity to perform research and enter the annual American College of Legal Medicine (ACLM) poster competition. Lambert and Cullison worked diligently to research the laboratory testing methodology evaluating cognitive impairment while operating a motor vehicle under the influence of marijuana. Their research and recommendation that Nevada adopt a blood test for marijuana impairment while driving a motor vehicle earned the first place award for best poster at ACLM’s national competition. Lambert explains, “Our research focused on the testing methods used to presume cognitive impairment from marijuana use, as it pertains to Nevada Revised Statute 484C.110.  We found urinalysis testing for the presence of THC-COOH to be entirely inappropriate; these tests should be replaced with a blood test only, for delta-9-THC and 11-OH-THC.  This project was a meta-analysis of multiple peer-reviewed research articles, medical toxicology texts, and lectures, as well as interviewing the toxicology labs of the Henderson Police Department, Las Vegas Metropolitan Police Department and Washoe County’s Sheriff’s Office.” The research led to the conclusion that Nevada Revised Statutes, NRS 484C.110, governing marijuana and marijuana metabolite urine testing was inconsistent with sound, accepted science.  Nevada Assemblyman Steve Yeager learned of the students’ research and it prompted his introduction of AB135 in the 2017 Nevada Legislative session. Both students testified in Carson City and in Las Vegas to the Legislative Judiciary Committees. The bill won the support of many interested parties, including the Nevada District Attorneys Association and the Nevada Public Defenders Association. “Testifying before both the Nevada Assembly and Senate Judiciary Committees was an exciting experience for both of us,” said Cullison. “We will never forget the experience of working with Assemblyman Steve Yeager. He understood our message from day one and made sure we were included in every step of the process, from bill drafting to the bill signing.” AB135 passed both Houses of the Legislature and was signed into law by Governor Sandoval who hosted the two students at the signing ceremony in the Governor’s Office in Carson City. The bill passage came just weeks before recreational marijuana becomes available for sale in Nevada. Barring any delays, up to one ounce of marijuana can be legally sold for recreational use in Nevada for the first time beginning on July 1 to those 21 and older as a result of Question 2 passing in the fall of 2016. Even though possession of marijuana became legal Jan. 1, businesses did not have approval to sell recreational marijuana. “We are very proud of what Graham and Charles have accomplished with their research,” said Dr. John Dougherty, Dean of Touro’s College of Osteopathic Medicine. “Touro University Nevada encourages students to address health policy issues and dedicate themselves to making a positive impact. It is an important opportunity for them to learn that evidence based medicine can influence legislation such as this and has the potential to create positive change not only in Nevada but nationwide.” About Touro University Nevada Touro University Nevada (TUN) is a private, non-profit, Jewish-sponsored institution established to help address critical needs in health care and education and as a resource for community service in the state of Nevada. TUN opened its doors in 2004 and is now home to nearly 1,400 students, in a wide variety of degree programs including osteopathic medicine, physician assistant studies, education, nursing, occupational therapy and physical therapy. The university’s Henderson campus includes a multi-specialty health center and a multi-disciplinary Center for Autism and Developmental Disabilities. For more information on TUN, please visit www.tun.touro.edu or call 702- 777-8687.


Johnson G.A.,Duke University | Badea A.,Duke University | Brandenburg J.,Duke University | Cofer G.,Duke University | And 4 more authors.
NeuroImage | Year: 2010

We describe an atlas of the C57BL/6 mouse brain based on MRI and conventional Nissl histology. Magnetic resonance microscopy was performed on a total of 14 specimens that were actively stained to enhance tissue contrast. Images were acquired with three different MR protocols yielding contrast dependent on spin lattice relaxation (T1), spin spin relaxation (T2), and magnetic susceptibility (T2*). Spatial resolution was 21.5 μm (isotropic). Conventional histology (Nissl) was performed on a limited set of these same specimens and the Nissl images were registered (3D-to-3D) to the MR data. Probabilistic atlases for 37 structures are provided, along with average atlases. The availability of three different MR protocols, the Nissl data, and the labels provides a rich set of options for registration of other atlases to the same coordinate system, thus facilitating data-sharing. All the data is available for download via the web. © 2010 Elsevier Inc.


Lau C.,Touro University Nevada
American Journal of Occupational Therapy | Year: 2016

This phenomenological study revealed the lived experiences of occupational therapy students as they embarked on a semester-long volunteer health promotion service-learning project during their entry-level master's program. Data analysis extrapolated themes from student journals, transcriptions of pre- and postinterviews, and field notes. Student roles were exemplified by what students wanted to learn, what they actually learned, and the unexpected benefits they experienced. In particular, issues with teaming, interprofessional development, and time management were discovered. The findings add to the growing literature about the benefits of service learning as a teaching strategy and how it facilitates mindfulness of community service, communication, and clinical reasoning of future therapists. Implications for learning and practice are discussed.


News Article | November 24, 2016
Site: www.prweb.com

Healthpointe is pleased to announce the addition of Dr. Hailey Dizay, D.O., to the orthopedic, surgical and sports medicine team. Dr. Dizay is fully trained in treating patients suffering from fractures, swelling, bruising, strains, sprains, and sports related injuries along with pain in the muscles, tendons and joints. She also specializes in providing treatment for patients with limited range of motion, such as an inability to straighten the back, fully raise the arm, and other movements. Dr. Hailey Dizay is a board certified Orthopedic Surgeon who specializes in arthroscopic and minimally invasive reconstructive surgery, shoulder and knee disorders and sports medicine. She received her Bachelor of Science degree with honors from the University of California, San Diego, and then received her medical degree from Touro University Nevada. She completed her Orthopedic Surgery residency through Michigan State University at Metro Health Hospital. She completed further orthopedic subspecialty training through an Orthopedic Sports Medicine and Arthroscopy fellowship at the Sports Clinic in Laguna Hills, California. Dr. Dizay also has had extensive experience caring for athletes throughout her medical career. She has been a team physician for the University of California Irvine, The Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim, Laguna Hills High School, Michigan State Athletic games, Rockford High School, and several Mixed Martial Arts, kickboxing, boxing and running events. Healthpointe’s orthopedic specialists perform surgical procedures as a last resort for complicated musculoskeletal issues. However, our orthopedists will focus on delaying surgery as much as possible in favor of less invasive treatments, such as medication and physical therapy. If these treatments are exhausted and no longer provide any relief for pain and other symptoms, surgery may then be recommend. For more information on Healthpointe’s orthopedics department, or to learn more about Dr. Dizay, please schedule an appointment through http://www.Healthpointe.net or call (800) 856-2663. Healthpointe is a leading multidisciplinary healthcare organization offering a full range of medical services in practice locations throughout Southern California (Los Angeles County, Orange County, San Bernardino County, and Riverside County). Healthpointe has locations situated in over 10 cities in Southern California including Garden Grove, which is conveniently located by Stanton, Santa Ana, Westminster, Orange, Fountain Valley, Cypress and Anaheim. As a highly regarded musculoskeletal group, we have a personal investment in the highest level of service, and we are proud of our record of excellence over the last four decades with private patients, injured workers, urgent care, personal injuries, and professional and non-professional athletes. Leading our organization is a dynamic team of healthcare professionals who continually strive to be at the forefront of medical innovation and healthcare service delivery. For more information, a complete list of services, and Healthpointe locations, visit http://www.Healthpointe.net.


Daughton C.G.,U.S. Environmental Protection Agency | Ruhoy I.S.,Touro University Nevada | Ruhoy I.S.,University of Washington
Expert Review of Clinical Pharmacology | Year: 2011

Active pharmaceutical ingredients (APIs) are ubiquitous environmental contaminants, resulting primarily from excretion and bathing and from disposal of leftover drugs by consumers and healthcare facilities. Although prudent disposal of leftover drugs has attracted the most attention for reducing API levels in the aquatic environment, a more effective approach would prevent the generation of leftover drugs in the first place. Many aspects of the practice of medicine and pharmacy can be targeted for reducing environmental contamination by APIs. These same modifications - focused on treating humans and the environment as a single, integral patient - could also have collateral outcomes with improved therapeutic outcomes, and with a reduced incidence of unintended poisonings, drug interactions and drug diversion, and lower consumer costs. © 2011 Expert Reviews Ltd.

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