Touro University

Bethel Island, CA, United States

Touro University

Bethel Island, CA, United States

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Spector is Chairman Emeritus of New York College of Health Professions. He is widely recognized as one of the world's most prolific inventors with hundreds of issued patents. He has opened several multi-billion dollar industries with major corporations including Bristol-Myers Squibb which set up a separate division for some of his patents, AMF which launched the first hydraulic exerciser as the world famous Bruce Jenner Exerciser, also called the Muscleworker, as well as products for Mattel, Hasbro, Sun Chemical, Faberge, Remington and numerous other companies. Aside from hundreds of licensed products Spector also developed the first known patents for location based advertising, which was the basis for one of the first Super Apps and now is one of the largest businesses on the Internet. He has donated today's new patent to New York College, under the IP policy of the College. Also known for his ventures into the entertainment industry, Donald Spector partnered with Mitsui & Co. (one of the largest companies in the world), where he helped broker the sale of NBC in the Pacific Rim to Mitsui, as well as introducing QVC to Mitsui , which purchased half the rights of QVC for Japan and other parts of the Pacific Rim. He has been an executive producer on Broadway and president of a major record label, which featured in its format artists such as Elvis Presley, Stevie Wonder, Paul McCartney and Pavarotti. His record label was in partnership with Handleman, at the time the largest audio/video distributor in the United States. Spector attended the Columbia Science Honors Program at the age of 12. He later partnered with Victor Frenkil, the owner of Baltimore Contractors, the builder of part of Baltimore Washington International Airport, the Chesapeake Bay Bridge, the Baltimore Subway system as well as hundreds of other major projects.  He then joined with his cousin the owner of John Henry, the richest horse in racing history to create a conglomerate of consumer product companies. Spector is well known for his work in the fragrance industry, with medical technologies, security systems and computer technologies. Lisa Pamintuan, President of New York College says, "This new technology, added to the College's massive Intellectual Technology Portfolio which includes other donations from Spector, including patents in 3D printing, UV destruction of bacteria, acupressure clothing, as well a breakthrough Hologram Technologies and other technologies, have made our College a major force in Intellectual Property on a world class stage." New York College has signed Memoranda of Understanding with Wake Forest Innovations, the commercialization enterprise of Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center and Wake Forest University, as well as New York Medical College, part of the Touro University System. Chartered by the New York State Board of Regents, New York College of Health Professions, a not-for-profit institution located in Syosset, Long Island, with additional sites in New York City, offers institutionally accredited undergraduate and graduate-level degree programs in Massage Therapy, Acupuncture, Oriental Medicine and Herbal Medicine, and Certificate programs in Holistic Nursing for Registered Nurses and The Science of Self Improvement. New York College maintains a 30-acre modern medical facility in Luo Yang, The People's Republic of China. The College has grown remarkably in the past several years and will continue to develop new educational programs as well as expand into many new areas. For more information about New York College of Health Professions visit www.nycollege.edu or https://www.facebook.com/NewYorkCollegeofHealthProfessions. NEW YORK COLLEGE OF HEALTH PROFESSIONS 6801 Jericho Turnpike Syosset, New York www.NYCollege.edu To view the original version on PR Newswire, visit:http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/one-of-the-worlds-most-prolific-inventors-patents-thermometer-that-can-also-diagnose-specific-bacterial-infections-in-the-throat-in-less-than-one-minute-300458767.html


News Article | May 23, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

BestColleges.com, a leading provider of higher education information and resources, today announced a series of new rankings focused on degree opportunities in the Social Services. “The most rewarding work is having the opportunity to help others. We celebrate Mental Health Awareness Month by releasing a new series of rankings that feature online education programs in the Social Services. Our goal is to inspire, grow, and expand the all-important workforce that specializes in mental health and social services,” said Stephanie Snider, General Manager, BestColleges.com The Rankings with the top ten schools from each list of twenty-five: Bachelor’s in Sociology 1. University of Central Florida 2. Arizona State University - Tempe 3. Central Washington University 4. Brandman University 5. University of Colorado Denver 6. University of Nebraska at Omaha 7. Fort Hays State University 8. Oregon State University 9. North Dakota State University 10. South Dakota State University Bachelor’s in Psychology 1. University of Central Florida 2. University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign 3. Liberty University 4. University of North Dakota 5. University of Florida - Online 6. Trine University - Regional/Non-Traditional Campuses 7. LeTourneau University 8. University of Massachusetts - Lowell 9. Florida International University 10. Old Dominion University Bachelor’s in Counseling 1. John Wesley University 2. Johnson University 3. Indiana Wesleyan University - Marion 4. University of Cincinnati 5. University of South Dakota 6. Crown College 7. Northwestern State University of Louisiana 8. Oral Roberts University 9. Grace College and Theological Seminary 10. University of Central Arkansas Master’s in Psychology 1. Harvard University 2. University of Georgia 3. Touro University Worldwide 4. Nova Southeastern University 5. Adler Graduate School 6. Adler University 7. William James College 8. The University of Tennessee - Knoxville 9. The Chicago School of Professional Psychology at Los Angeles 10. Carlos Albizu University - Miami Master’s in Social Work 1. Columbia University in the City of New York 2. University of Southern California 3. Case Western Reserve University 4. Boston University 5. University of Central Florida 6. Fordham University 7. University of Denver 8. University at Buffalo 9. Ohio State University 10. California State University - Long Beach Master’s in School Counseling 1. Lehigh University 2. New York University 3. Wake Forest University 4. Liberty University 5. University of Missouri - Columbia 6. University of North Dakota 7. University of West Alabama 8. Seton Hall University 9. Concordia University - Wisconsin 10. Missouri Baptist University Full rankings can be found on each subject page by following the hyperlink in the titles. The 2017 rankings reflect the most recent data compiled from IPEDS and the College Navigator, both of which are hosted by the National Center for Education Statistics. The goal is to objectively assess relative quality based on academic outcomes, affordability, and the breadth and depth of online learning opportunities. Each school must meet the minimum criteria of being an accredited public or private, not-for-profit institution, and submit an annual report the the National Center for Education Statistics. More information on methodology can be found here: http://www.bestcolleges.com/subject-ranking-methodology/ About BestColleges.com: BestColleges.com helps prospective students find the school that best meets their needs through proprietary research, user-friendly guides, and hundreds of unique college rankings. They also provide a wide array of college planning, financial aid, and career resources to help all students get the most from their education and prepare them for the world after college.


News Article | May 2, 2017
Site: www.chromatographytechniques.com

Results from a clinical review published in The Journal of the American Osteopathic Association find nearly 1 billion people worldwide may have deficient or insufficient levels of vitamin D due to chronic disease and inadequate sun exposure related to sunscreen use. The study also found that 95 percent of African American adults may have vitamin D deficiency or insufficiency. Vitamin D variations among races are attributed to differences in skin pigmentation. "People are spending less time outside and, when they do go out, they're typically wearing sunscreen, which essentially nullifies the body's ability to produce vitamin D," said Kim Pfotenhauer, DO, assistant professor at Touro University and a researcher on this study. "While we want people to protect themselves against skin cancer, there are healthy, moderate levels of unprotected sun exposure that can be very helpful in boosting vitamin D." Dr. Pfotenhauer also said chronic diseases like Type 2 Diabetes and those related to malabsorption, including kidney disease, Crohn's and celiac disease greatly inhibit the body's ability to metabolize vitamin D from food sources. Considered a hormone rather than a vitamin, vitamin D is produced when skin is exposed to sunlight. Vitamin D receptors are found in virtually every cell in the human body. As a result, it plays a wide role in the body's functions, including cell growth modulation, neuromuscular and immune function and inflammation reduction. Symptoms for insufficient or deficient vitamin D include muscle weakness and bone fractures. People exhibiting these symptoms or who have chronic diseases known to decrease vitamin D, should have their levels checked and, if found to be low, discuss treatment options. However, universal screening is likely neither necessary nor prudent absent significant symptoms or chronic disease. Increasing and maintaining healthy vitamin D levels can be as easy as spending 5-30 minutes in midday sun twice per week. The appropriate time depends on a person's geographic location and skin pigmentation -- lighter skin synthesizes more vitamin D than darker skin. It is important to forgo sunscreen during these sessions because SPF 15 or greater decreases vitamin D3 production by 99 percent. "You don't need to go sunbathing at the beach to get the benefits," said Pfotenhauer. "A simple walk with arms and legs exposed is enough for most people." Food sources such as milk, breakfast cereals, and Portobello mushrooms are also fortified with vitamin D. Pfotenhauer said supplements are a good option, as they are effective and pose few risks, provided they are taken as directed and a physician is consulted beforehand. Research is ongoing to determine whether vitamin D deficiency has a role in multiple sclerosis, autoimmune disorders, infections, respiratory disease, cardiometabolic disease, cancer, and fracture risk. "Science has been trying to find a one-to-one correspondence between vitamin D levels and specific diseases," said Pfotenhauer. "Given vitamin D's ubiquitous role in the body, I believe sufficient vitamin D is more about overall health. Our job as osteopathic physicians is to recognize those patients that need to be tested and treat them accordingly." Currently, insufficiency is defined as between 21 and 30 ng/ml and deficiency is considered below 20ng/ml by the Endocrine Society.


News Article | May 3, 2017
Site: www.techtimes.com

A new clinical review indicates that around a billion people in the world suffer from vitamin D deficiency. This deficiency is owing to some form of disease, or because of the application of sunscreen on the body while exposed to the sun. The skin produces vitamin D compound when it comes into contact with sunlight. However, due to the growing concern of skin cancer, many people prefer applying sunscreen lotions before going out. Researchers of the study posit that use of sunblock or sunscreen lotions has become quite common among people. However, the researchers stress that moderate exposure to sun does not increase the risk of melanoma or skin cancer, but instead helps the body metabolize the crucial vitamin D needed to maintain healthy bodily functions. "People are spending less time outside and, when they do go out, they're typically wearing sunscreen, which essentially nullifies the body's ability to produce vitamin D," Kim Pfotenhauer, an assistant professor at Touro University and one of the researchers involved in the study, remarked. Some diseases like Type 2 Diabetes, celiac disease, and kidney disorders greatly reduce the body's ability to metabolize the vitamin D3 component. These diseases were also held responsible for the global vitamin D deficiency. People with less vitamin D in their body usually report weakness in the muscle and may even experience bone fractures relatively easily vis-à-vis those who have sufficient vitamin D. It is advisable that any individual who suffers from a chronic disease should also get their vitamin D level checked by medical practitioners. Research trying to determine any link between vitamin D deficiency and autoimmune diseases, multiple sclerosis, respiratory disease, cancer, and more is also underway. According to researchers, it is essential for people to set aside some time every week to expose their skin to the sun's rays. "You don't need to go sunbathing at the beach to get the benefits. A simple walk with arms and legs exposed is enough for most people," Pfotenhauer suggested. Depending on the individual's skin tone, roughly 5 minutes to 30 minutes, spent under the mid-day sun twice a week will ensure that vitamin D levels are properly maintained. This time spent in sun should be without the application of any sunscreen, as SPF 15 reduces the skin's ability to metabolize vitamin D3 by 99 percent. Consuming milk and Portobello mushrooms are a good way of boosting vitamin D levels in the body. People can also rely on vitamin D supplements. However, one should discuss the intake with their physician first. The results of the study have been published in The Journal of the American Osteopathic Association. © 2017 Tech Times, All rights reserved. Do not reproduce without permission.


"People are spending less time outside and, when they do go out, they're typically wearing sunscreen, which essentially nullifies the body's ability to produce vitamin D," said Kim Pfotenhauer, DO, assistant professor at Touro University and a researcher on this study. "While we want people to protect themselves against skin cancer, there are healthy, moderate levels of unprotected sun exposure that can be very helpful in boosting vitamin D." Dr. Pfotenhauer also said chronic diseases like Type 2 Diabetes and those related to malabsorption, including kidney disease, Crohn's and celiac disease greatly inhibit the body's ability to metabolize vitamin D from food sources. Considered a hormone rather than a vitamin, vitamin D is produced when skin is exposed to sunlight. Vitamin D receptors are found in virtually every cell in the human body. As a result, it plays a wide role in the body's functions, including cell growth modulation, neuromuscular and immune function and inflammation reduction. Symptoms for insufficient or deficient vitamin D include muscle weakness and bone fractures. People exhibiting these symptoms or who have chronic diseases known to decrease vitamin D, should have their levels checked and, if found to be low, discuss treatment options. However, universal screening is likely neither necessary nor prudent absent significant symptoms or chronic disease. Increasing and maintaining healthy vitamin D levels can be as easy as spending 5–30 minutes in midday sun twice per week. The appropriate time depends on a person's geographic location and skin pigmentation—lighter skin synthesizes more vitamin D than darker skin. It is important to forgo sunscreen during these sessions because SPF 15 or greater decreases vitamin D3 production by 99 percent. "You don't need to go sunbathing at the beach to get the benefits," said Dr. Pfotenhauer. "A simple walk with arms and legs exposed is enough for most people." Food sources such as milk, breakfast cereals, and Portobello mushrooms are also fortified with vitamin D. Dr. Pfotenhauer said supplements are a good option, as they are effective and pose few risks, provided they are taken as directed and a physician is consulted beforehand. Research is ongoing to determine whether vitamin D deficiency has a role in multiple sclerosis, autoimmune disorders, infections, respiratory disease, cardiometabolic disease, cancer, and fracture risk. "Science has been trying to find a one-to-one correspondence between vitamin D levels and specific diseases," said Dr. Pfotenhauer. "Given vitamin D's ubiquitous role in the body, I believe sufficient vitamin D is more about overall health. Our job as osteopathic physicians is to recognize those patients that need to be tested and treat them accordingly." Currently, insufficiency is defined as between 21 and 30 ng/ml and deficiency is considered below 20ng/ml by the Endocrine Society. About The Journal of the American Osteopathic Association The Journal of the American Osteopathic Association (JAOA) is the official scientific publication of the American Osteopathic Association. Edited by Robert Orenstein, DO, it is the premier scholarly peer-reviewed publication of the osteopathic medical profession. The JAOA's mission is to advance medicine through the publication of peer-reviewed osteopathic research. To view the original version on PR Newswire, visit:http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/widespread-vitamin-d-deficiency-likely-due-to-sunscreen-use-increase-of-chronic-diseases-300448231.html


News Article | May 2, 2017
Site: www.chromatographytechniques.com

Results from a clinical review published in The Journal of the American Osteopathic Association find nearly 1 billion people worldwide may have deficient or insufficient levels of vitamin D due to chronic disease and inadequate sun exposure related to sunscreen use. The study also found that 95 percent of African American adults may have vitamin D deficiency or insufficiency. Vitamin D variations among races are attributed to differences in skin pigmentation. "People are spending less time outside and, when they do go out, they're typically wearing sunscreen, which essentially nullifies the body's ability to produce vitamin D," said Kim Pfotenhauer, DO, assistant professor at Touro University and a researcher on this study. "While we want people to protect themselves against skin cancer, there are healthy, moderate levels of unprotected sun exposure that can be very helpful in boosting vitamin D." Dr. Pfotenhauer also said chronic diseases like Type 2 Diabetes and those related to malabsorption, including kidney disease, Crohn's and celiac disease greatly inhibit the body's ability to metabolize vitamin D from food sources. Considered a hormone rather than a vitamin, vitamin D is produced when skin is exposed to sunlight. Vitamin D receptors are found in virtually every cell in the human body. As a result, it plays a wide role in the body's functions, including cell growth modulation, neuromuscular and immune function and inflammation reduction. Symptoms for insufficient or deficient vitamin D include muscle weakness and bone fractures. People exhibiting these symptoms or who have chronic diseases known to decrease vitamin D, should have their levels checked and, if found to be low, discuss treatment options. However, universal screening is likely neither necessary nor prudent absent significant symptoms or chronic disease. Increasing and maintaining healthy vitamin D levels can be as easy as spending 5-30 minutes in midday sun twice per week. The appropriate time depends on a person's geographic location and skin pigmentation -- lighter skin synthesizes more vitamin D than darker skin. It is important to forgo sunscreen during these sessions because SPF 15 or greater decreases vitamin D3 production by 99 percent. "You don't need to go sunbathing at the beach to get the benefits," said Pfotenhauer. "A simple walk with arms and legs exposed is enough for most people." Food sources such as milk, breakfast cereals, and Portobello mushrooms are also fortified with vitamin D. Pfotenhauer said supplements are a good option, as they are effective and pose few risks, provided they are taken as directed and a physician is consulted beforehand. Research is ongoing to determine whether vitamin D deficiency has a role in multiple sclerosis, autoimmune disorders, infections, respiratory disease, cardiometabolic disease, cancer, and fracture risk. "Science has been trying to find a one-to-one correspondence between vitamin D levels and specific diseases," said Pfotenhauer. "Given vitamin D's ubiquitous role in the body, I believe sufficient vitamin D is more about overall health. Our job as osteopathic physicians is to recognize those patients that need to be tested and treat them accordingly." Currently, insufficiency is defined as between 21 and 30 ng/ml and deficiency is considered below 20ng/ml by the Endocrine Society.

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