Torrijos Health District

Torrijos, Spain

Torrijos Health District

Torrijos, Spain

Time filter

Source Type

Montero J.C.,Health science Institute | Miron I.J.,Torrijos Health District | Criado-Alvarez J.J.,University of Castilla - La Mancha | Linares C.,Carlos III Institute of Health | Diaz J.,Carlos III Institute of Health
Science of the Total Environment | Year: 2010

Introduction: As is known, the effects of extreme temperatures on mortality are characterised by an annual periodicity, with a rise centred in the winter months. The most recent epidemiological studies show that mortality caused by cold waves is, in many cases, comparable to that caused by the severest heat waves. This study sought to quantify the rise in mortality due to extreme cold and the factors that determine the relationship between these variables in Castile-La Mancha (Spain). Methods: We examined the effect of extreme winter temperature on daily non accidental cause mortality in Castile - La Mancha from 1975 to 2003, for all ages. Quantitative analyses were performed using ARIMA models, with other covariates, such as influenza, pressure trends, relative humidity, and cold wave duration and chronological number. Results: There were two mortality peaks: a short-term peak (with a lag of 3 to 7 days); and a longer term peak (of under two weeks). Excess mortality during cold waves was around 10% per degree centigrade below the threshold temperature for all the provinces except Guadalajara, where an increase of only 4.61% was detected.Mortality increased in response to rises in cold-wave duration and relative humidity. Cold waves occurring at the end of the "winter" season caused the greatest mortality. Conclusions: This study confirms that daily mortality in Castile - La Mancha increases during cold waves. Efficient cold-wave prevention plans must therefore be implemented. Such plans should be based on in-depth knowledge of the causes that underlie and modulate the relationship between low temperatures and health effects. © 2010 Elsevier B.V.


Montero J.C.,Health science Institute | Miron I.J.,Torrijos Health District | Criado J.J.,Castile La Mancha Health Service | Linares C.,Carlos III Institute of Health | Diaz J.,Carlos III Institute of Health
Science of the Total Environment | Year: 2010

Introduction: Following the 2003 heat wave, many European countries implemented heat-wave prevention plans. A number of aspects can prove fundamental in determining the effectiveness of such plans, and of these we sought to analyse the criteria used to define threshold temperatures and trigger a higher level of intervention. Method: Retrospective study of the days on which heat-wave thresholds were exceeded during the period 1974-2003 was conducted. We compared when and at what level the heat-wave prevention plan would have been activated using a statistical-meteorological criterion (as applied by the Spanish Ministry of Health & Consumer Affairs) versus a temperature-mortality criterion. Results: The number of days on which the threshold was exceeded was far higher when the temperature-mortality criterion was applied. The temperature percentile at which a heat wave occurred was different for each province analysed and was inversely proportional to its respective ageing index. Using both criteria, there was an increase in heat-wave days per decade. Conclusion: The establishment of a heat-wave threshold temperature must be based on knowledge of the cause-effect relationship between temperature and the health of a given population. Mortality is an appropriate indicator of population health. The future effects of climate change render it essential for this relationship to be studied on a local scale, so as to enable truly efficient prevention plans to be drawn up. © 2010 Elsevier B.V.


Linares C.,Carlos III Institute of Health | Carmona R.,Carlos III Institute of Health | Tobias A.,The Water Council | Miron I.J.,Torrijos Health District | Diaz J.,Carlos III Institute of Health
Environmental Science and Pollution Research | Year: 2015

Approximately, 20 % of particulate and aerosol emissions into the urban atmosphere are of natural origin (including wildfires and Saharan dust). During these natural episodes, PM10 and PM2.5 levels usually exceed World Health Organisation (WHO) health protection thresholds. This study sought to evaluate the possible effect of advections of particulate matter from biomass fuel combustion on daily specific-cause mortality among the general population and the segment aged ≥75 years in Madrid. Ecological time-series study in the city of Madrid from January 01, 2004 to December 31, 2009. The dependent variable analysed was daily mortality due to natural (ICD-10:A00-R99), circulatory (ICD-10:I00-I99), and respiratory (ICD-10:J00-J99) causes in the population, both general and aged ≥75 years. The following independent and control variables were considered: a) daily mean PM2.5 and PM10 concentrations; b) maximum daily temperature; c) daily mean O3 and NO2 concentrations; d) advection of particulate matter from biomass combustion (http://www.calima.ws/), using a dichotomous variable and e) linear trend and seasonalities. We conducted a descriptive analysis, performed a test of means and, to ascertain relative risk, fitted a model using autoregressive Poisson regression and stratifying by days with and without biomass advection, in both populations. Of the 2192 days analysed, biomass advection occurred on 56, with mean PM2.5 and PM10 values registering a significant increase during these days. PM10 had a greater impact on organic mortality with advection (RRall ages = 1.035 [1.011–1.060]; RR ≥ 75 years = 1.066 [1.031–1.103]) than did PM2.5 without advection (RRall ages = 1.017 [1.009–1.025]; RR ≥ 75 years = 1.012 [1.003–1.022]). Among specific causes, respiratory—though not circulatory—causes were associated with PM10 on days with advection in ≥75 year age group. PM10, rather than PM2.5, were associated with an increase in natural cause mortality on days with advection of particulate matter from biomass combustion, particularly in the ≥75 year age group. © 2014, Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg.


Montero J.C.,Health science Institute | Miron I.J.,Torrijos Health District | Criado-Alvarez J.J.,Castile La Mancha Health Service | Linares C.,Carlos III Institute of Health | Diaz J.,Carlos III Institute of Health
Science of the Total Environment | Year: 2012

Introduction: All the climate-change studies undertaken to date agree that one of the principal consequences of this phenomenon is the increase in heat waves, which, without exception, are linked to marked rises in mortality. The characteristics that modulate and determine the relationship between high temperatures and health must therefore be ascertained in the greatest possible detail, so that really effective prevention plans can be designed to address temperature extremes. Methods: We examined the effect of heat waves on daily non-accidental-cause mortality across all age groups in the Castile-La Mancha region (Spain) from 1975 to 2003. Quantitative analyses were performed using autoregressive integrated moving average (ARIMA) models, with other covariates, such as pressure trends, relative humidity, and duration and chronological number of heat waves. Results: Mortality increased significantly with respect to the mean, when temperatures exceeded the designated provincial thresholds in Castile-La Mancha. For each degree centigrade that temperatures exceeded these thresholds, the percentage increase in mortality amounted to increases of approximately 12% over the daily mean, albeit with clear provincial variations. The longest heat waves were associated with daily mortality, with those at the end of summer causing the lowest mortality. Meteorological situations most closely associated with increases in mortality were cyclonic conditions accompanied by low humidity. Conclusions: Spatio-temporal variability in the temperature-mortality relationship must be studied in order to enable really effective heat-wave prevention plans to be drawn up. The influence of variables, such as heat-wave duration or time of appearance, is important in the total increase in mortality during temperature extremes. Since parameters, such as humidity or pressure trends, can play very different roles in different geographical settings, they should be analysed separately from temperature. © 2011 Elsevier B.V.

Loading Torrijos Health District collaborators
Loading Torrijos Health District collaborators