Torrey Pines Institute for Molecular Studies

Port Saint Lucie, FL, United States

Torrey Pines Institute for Molecular Studies

Port Saint Lucie, FL, United States

Torrey Pines Institute for Molecular Studies, also commonly referred to as TPIMS, is a non-profit biomedical research institute "dedicated to the discovery of causes, treatments and cures for a wide variety of diseases and afflictions including heart disease, cancer, AIDS, diabetes, multiple sclerosis, Alzheimer’s, aging-relating conditions, and pain management. Torrey Pines Institute for Molecular Studies is a 501 research center dedicated to conducting basic research to advance the understanding of human disease and the improvement of human health.Torrey Pines' scientists conduct research in fields associated with a wide variety of major medical conditions, including multiple sclerosis, cancer, heart disease, Types I and II diabetes, pain management, Alzheimer’s, inflammatory disorders, AIDS and other infectious diseases, regenerative medicine, obesity, transplant rejection, muscle wasting syndrome, rheumatoid arthritis and new methods for drug discovery.The Institute fosters an innovative research environment, believing that multidisciplinary and collaborative approaches accelerate the discovery process.Techniques created by Torrey Pines Institute include individual compounds arrays, mixture-based synthetic combinatorial libraries, positional scanning deconvolution, biometrical analysis, libraries from libraries, small molecule and heterocyclic compounds, and direct in-vivo testing of mixtures. Wikipedia.


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Patent
Torrey Pines Institute for Molecular Studies | Date: 2015-05-01

Embodiments of the present disclosure provide for compositions including a compound, pharmaceutical compositions including the compound, methods of treatment of a disease or related condition (e.g., neurological disease on condition), methods of treatment using compositions or pharmaceutical compositions, and the like.


"We are pleased to partner with Tri-I TDI and provide our compound collection," said Richard Houghten, Ph.D., Founder and CEO, TPIMS. "Our technologies can enable high-throughput screening in a variety of biological assay formats, including phenotypic assays.  This collaboration aims to accelerate drug discovery, ultimately providing new therapies to treat human diseases." Through this partnership, TPIMS will provide Tri-I TDI with the TPIMS compound collection for screening to identify hit compounds within Tri-I TDI research programs. This provides Tri-I TDI with capabilities to perform high-throughput screening across a variety of assay platforms with TPIMS' unique compound collection. "We believe that access to the TPIMS compound collection will enhance our ability to deliver on our mission. Leads from these collections should enable the progression of groundbreaking academic discoveries to preclinical studies in order to demonstrate their relevance in blocking disease initiation and progression," stated Peter T. Meinke, Ph.D., VP, Preclinical Development, Tri-I TDI. The Tri-Institutional Therapeutics Discovery Institute (Tri-I TDI) connects researchers from Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, The Rockefeller University and Weill Cornell Medicine with collaborators from across the globe to remove the barriers that impede drug discovery in academic settings. Together with its partners, Takeda Pharmaceuticals and Bridge Medicines, the Tri-I TDI enables the discovery of next-generation drugs by empowering faculty with the tools, technology, and expertise to meet this extraordinary challenge.  This partnership leverages combined resources to help academic researchers rapidly advance their groundbreaking discoveries along the path from bench to bedside. Torrey Pines Institute for Molecular Studies (TPIMS) is a non-profit institute dedicated to conducting basic research to advance the understanding of human disease and the improvement of human health.  TPIMS' scientists conduct research in fields associated with a wide variety of major medical conditions, including addiction, Alzheimer's, arthritis, cancer, diabetes, heart disease, infectious disease, inflammatory disorders, multiple sclerosis, obesity, pain management, regenerative medicine and new methods for drug discovery.


Patent
University of Bath, Torrey Pines Institute for Molecular Studies and SRI International | Date: 2014-12-05

The present invention relates to opioid compounds, especially to C14 esters and ethers of naltrexone and analogues thereof. The present invention also relates to compositions, methods and medical uses that employ such compounds. More specifically, the present invention pertains to compounds of formula: and to their use in the treatment of diseases and disorders including pain, hyperalgesia, addiction, substance abuse disorders, stress, anorexia, anxiety, depression, cough, asthma, hypertension, gastrointestinal motility disorder, water retention, cognitive disorders, and locomotor disorders.


Patent
Stc.Unm and Torrey Pines Institute for Molecular Studies | Date: 2016-02-02

The present invention provides novel methods and assays for high-throughput screening of combinatorial libraries to identify FPR1 and/or FPR2 ligands (e.g., agonists and/or antagonists), preferably FPR1 agonists and/or FPR2 antagonists, by positional scanning deconvolution. The invention also provides novel FPR1 and FPR2 ligands (e.g, agonists and antagonists), related pharmaceutical compositions and methods of treating FPR1 and FPR2-related disorders.


Patent
MannKind Corporation and Torrey Pines Institute for Molecular Studies | Date: 2015-02-13

Methods and compositions for treating pain are disclosed. The compositions are based on dry powders comprising microparticles of diketopiperazines and an analgesic active agent. The analgesic in the compositions comprises one or more peptide analgesics or derivatives thereof, which are administered to a subject using a pulmonary inhalation drug delivery system comprising a dry powder inhaler and the analgesic composition. The present compositions produce fewer side effects associated with current opioid therapy.


Medina-Franco J.L.,Torrey Pines Institute for Molecular Studies
Journal of Chemical Information and Modeling | Year: 2012

Systematic description of structure-activity relationships (SARs) of data sets and structure-property relationships (SPRs) is of paramount importance in medicinal chemistry and other research fields. To this end, structure-activity similarity (SAS) maps are one of the first tools proposed to describe SARs using the concept of activity landscape modeling. One of the major goals of the SAS maps is to identify activity cliffs defined as chemical compounds with high similar structure but unexpectedly very different biological activity. Since the first publication of the SAS maps more than ten years ago, these tools have evolved and adapted over the years to analyze various types of compound collections, including structural diverse and combinatorial sets with activity for one or multiple biological end points. The development of SAS maps has led to general concepts that are applicable to other activity landscape methods such as "consensus activity cliffs" (activity cliffs common to a series of representations or descriptors) and "selectivity switches" (structural changes that completely invert the selectivity pattern of similar compounds against two biological end points). Herein, we review the development, practical applications, limitations, and perspectives of the SAS and related maps which are intuitive and powerful informatics tools to computationally analyze SPRs. © 2012 American Chemical Society.


Samad F.,Torrey Pines Institute for Molecular Studies
Blood | Year: 2013

Clinical and epidemiological studies support a connection between obesity and thrombosis, involving elevated expression of the prothrombotic molecules plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 and tissue factor (TF) and increased platelet activation. Cardiovascular diseases and metabolic syndrome-associated disorders, including obesity, insulin resistance, type 2 diabetes, and hepatic steatosis, involve inflammation elicited by infiltration and activation of immune cells, particularly macrophages, into adipose tissue. Although TF has been clearly linked to a procoagulant state in obesity, emerging genetic and pharmacologic evidence indicate that TF signaling via G protein-coupled protease-activated receptors (PAR2, PAR1) additionally drives multiple aspects of the metabolic syndrome. TF-PAR2 signaling in adipocytes contributes to diet-induced obesity by decreasing metabolism and energy expenditure, whereas TF-PAR2 signaling in hematopoietic and myeloid cells drives adipose tissue inflammation, hepatic steatosis, and insulin resistance. TF-initiated coagulation leading to thrombin-PAR1 signaling also contributes to diet-induced hepatic steatosis and inflammation in certain models. Thus, in obese patients, clinical markers of a prothrombotic state may indicate a risk for the development of complications of the metabolic syndrome. Furthermore, TF-induced signaling could provide new therapeutic targets for drug development at the intersection between obesity, inflammation, and thrombosis.


Kumar V.,Torrey Pines Institute for Molecular Studies
Journal of Hepatology | Year: 2013

Natural killer T cells (NKT) are innate-like cells which are abundant in liver sinusoids and express the cell surface receptors of NK cells (e.g., NK1.1 (mouse) or CD161+/CD56+(human)) as well as an antigen receptor (TCR) characteristic of conventional T cells. NKT cells recognize lipid antigens in the context of CD1d, a non-polymorphic MHC class I-like molecule. Activation of NKT cells has a profound influence on the immune response against tumors and infectious organisms and in autoimmune diseases. NKT cells can be categorized into at least two distinct subsets: iNKT or type I use a semi-invariant TCR, whereas type II NKT TCRs are more diverse. Recent evidence suggests that NKT-cell subsets can play opposing roles early in non-microbial liver inflammation in that type I NKT are proinflammatory whereas type II NKT cells inhibit type I NKT-mediated liver injury. © 2013 European Association for the Study of the Liver.


Patent
Torrey Pines Institute for Molecular Studies | Date: 2015-04-30

Embodiments of the present disclosure provide for compositions including a compound, pharmaceutical compositions including the compound, methods of treatment of a disease or related condition (e.g., neurological disease on condition), methods of treatment using compositions or pharmaceutical compositions, and the like.


Grant
Agency: Department of Health and Human Services | Branch: | Program: STTR | Phase: Phase I | Award Amount: 205.82K | Year: 2012

DESCRIPTION (provided by applicant): The long term objective of this Phase 1 study is to produce an antibody-based diagnostic assay to detect tumor responsiveness to a widely used class of chemotherapeutic agents derived from camptothecin that includes Irinotecan and Topotecan. The assay will be based on a novel biomarker associated with cellular sensitivity to camptothecin and will have clinical application to distinguish cancer patients likely to respond to camptothecin-derived therapeutics from those unlikely to respond. With this information, the physician can tailor the treatment regimen to be better adapted to the individual patient's tumor phenotype, thereby improving the chances of successful treatment. There is an urgent and unmet need for diagnostic assays of this type for camptothecin-derived chemotherapeutic drugs because of the wide application of these drugs today in the treatment of a variety of cancers. Nevertheless, because a substantial fraction of tumors do not respond to therapy due to poorly understood resistance mechanisms, and because there are presently few diagnostic tools available to the physician to predict therapy responses, there is a significant risk that some patients will be exposed to the toxic side effects of treatment without therapeutic benefit, and will lose time that could have been used for other treatments. The Specific Aims of the project are to are (1) to use immunoblot analysis to validate the biomarker as an indicator of camptothecin sensitivity using an available rabbit polyclonal antibody to screen a panel of cancer-derived and normal cell lines, (2) to evaluate 2 additional possible assay formats, and (3) to produce and evaluate a monoclonal antibody to this biomarker. The study will employ standard biological techniques, including cell-based viability assays, Western immunoblot assays, ELISA assays, immunohistochemistry, and enzymatic assays. The results of this study will be used to support a larger Phase 2 evaluation of human tumor specimens and to advance further commercial development. PUBLIC HEALTH RELEVANCE: This project will develop a clinical assay to identify cancer patients whose tumors are likely to respond to camptothecin-based chemotherapeutic drugs, and distinguish them from patients unlikelyto respond. Because a substantial fraction of tumors do not respond to therapy for reasons that remain unclear, and because there are presently few tools available for predicting tumor responsiveness, there is a significant risk that some patients will receive the wrong treatment. The study therefore addresses the urgent and unmet need for better diagnostic tools to be used by physicians to design more individualized treatment regimens.

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