ToolingDocs LLC

Ashland, OH, United States

ToolingDocs LLC

Ashland, OH, United States
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Winton R.,ToolingDocs LLC
Annual Technical Conference - ANTEC, Conference Proceedings | Year: 2013

All mold builders perform mold repair, usually on molds they built. But few strategize to also offer ongoing mold maintenance services. A system has been developed for training and certifying mold builders and to put in place a documentation software system that enables them to serve as an extension of molders' toolrooms, thus freeing up a molder's employees for only the most specialized on-site emergency mold repair work. This system, called 'Certified Maintenance Provider', consists of training, software installation, and subsequent auditing, in order to position a mold builder to bccome a source for maintenance within the company's immediate region.


Johnson S.,ToolingDocs LLC
Plastics Technology | Year: 2012

The idea behind data usage in mold maintenance is to use historical bits of information to guide people like a crystal ball as an indicator of the future. Anyone who wants to produce quality parts efficiently and on time. As those in charge of keeping molds running, our job is to devise a plan to eliminate or reduce the frequency of the issues that cost companies money and bog down continuous improvement. Repair technicians want to be better informed and make better decisions and improve their skills. Shareholders and owners want to make more money and grow the business. It would seem 20 bits is a small price to pay for so much opportunity. The 20 data bits are best collected at specific intervals during a mold's run/repair cycle. When tool room managers are not challenged with certain key performance indicators, chances are they will never be able to set nor achieve goals.


Johnson S.,Tooling Docs LLC
Plastics Technology | Year: 2011

Some of the steps that need to be taken by plastic operations to create work cell are discussed. A work cell is an arrangement of resources in a manufacturing environment to improve the quality, speed, and cost of a process by examining the process flow and eliminating waste. It is essential to reduce the steps and time necessary to perform the PMs and cleanings before reducing or eliminating any of the procedures. It is also essential to remember that workbench size and related tools will be dictated by the type, size, and number of molds for most of the part.


Johnson S.,ToolingDocs LLC
Plastics Technology | Year: 2011

A mold tooling technician needs to look at the decision process used to determine the tooling to replace a worn out mold tooling component. The technician needs to follow this process to better understand the corrective-action options that are faced by him or her every day. There are basically two categories of defects that repair technicians have to deal with when replacing worn out mold tooling components. They are mold function issues that do not directly affect the part and tooling issues that affect the part geometry. All defects need to be recorded and tracked by mold position so that one can look for patterns or trends that can point to insufficient cooling, heating, or runner and flow balance, along with gate and venting issues and other process-related root causes. Technicians also need to remember that mold position numbers never change and need to be stamped, etched, or ground into plates and tooling so that components are put in Appropriate places.


Johnson S.,Tooling Docs LLC
Plastics Technology | Year: 2011

Steven Johnson, the operations manager for ToolingDocs LLC, advices toolroom managers of a mold shop how to lead their team effectively. In the trade of mold repair, leadership usually comes in the form of a repair technician or journeyman toolmaker whose skills and experience rises above the rest and has a solid reputation in troubleshooting and repairing molds. In order to lead effectively and change a long-standing reactive culture, tool-room managers must base more decisions on accurate data. This data not only tracks and measures high-cost issues, but qualifies specific procedures that must be followed to ensure safe and proven techniques that result in consistent and reliable mold performance. Toolmanagers should employ a documentation system that allows standardization of terms in a structured format. They must post in the shop weekly reports that reveal the top 10 mold-stop reasons, defects, and corrective actions by frequency and repair costs.


Johnson S.,ToolingDocs LLC
Annual Technical Conference - ANTEC, Conference Proceedings | Year: 2012

Molding shops and mold builders realize more and more that the continued practices of a reactive "fix it when it breaks" maintenance strategy is an exercise in futility. Excessive tooling and labor costs, missed production shipments and repeating part quality issues caused by knee jerk solutions and quick, cheap repairs stifle company growth. Changing a long standing reactive maintenance culture involves understanding the "5 factors of focus" that control tool room performance.


Johnson S.,ToolingDocs LLC
Plastics Technology | Year: 2010

An appropriately designed hoist system plays a key role in meeting the requirements of a mold-repair shop. A properly designed and smoothly operating hoist is a valuable tool that need not be limited to moving molds about the toolroom, but utilized continually to allow the technician to position mold plates and tooling in a more comfortable arrangement. Technicians need to have access to a hoist when they need it to improve maintenance efficiency. Some hoist systems can turn a simple mold assembly into a gut-wrenching exercise in uncontrolled plate movement, while others are dangerous to work with. Careful considerations need to be given to achieve a design that will provide the safest and most efficient workflow through all the stages of mold repair and cleaning when the main function of the crane is to service a mold-repair area.


Johnson S.,ToolingDocs LLC
Plastics Technology | Year: 2010

Steve Johnson discusses how imperative it is for a mold-repair shop to be well thought out to keep maintenance unencumbered by bottlenecks while technicians scramble to move, bench, separate, clean, assemble, test, and rack molds. The type of product molded, physical mold size, and MPP will dictate some of the shop's design features and ancillary requirements. A hypothetical shop will require four repair techs to clean and repair at least one 32-cavity mold each per 8-hr day. This is not unlike the shop pace where Steve spent 24 years as a toolmaker. Steve says that implementing an efficient and accurate C/Ron a 32-cavity mold in 8 hr leaves no time for wandering around searching for tools or fantasy football discussions. Four benches in a single row will work well in our square footprint. Since this shop will also be engaged in mold rebuilds, it must share space with a few metalworking machines.


Johnson S.,Tooling Docs LLC
Plastics Technology | Year: 2010

Steven Johnson, the operations manager for ToolingDocs LLC, provides some suggestions for starting and maintaining an efficient toolshop. Creating an efficient repair shop must take into consideration the MPP (Mold Pull Pace) of the company, mold sizes and types, and the specific types of tasks that go into cleaning and repairing particular molds throughout the week. It takes commitment and a disciplined culture to keep shelves, files, spare parts, tools, solvents, and water-leak and hot-runner stations clean and organized, and to schedule a weekly time to sweep and mop floors. Unfortunately, mold-maintenance shop layout and tools don't often qualify for much more than off-the-cuff consideration, because upper management is more concerned with the direct money-making aspects of manufacturing areas such as production, assembly and just about everything else. As processors continue to look for ways to improve their manufacturing systems, many will be looking at ways to either improve the workflow or capacity of their mold repair shop or possibly build a new one.


Johnson S.,ToolingDocs LLC
Plastics Technology | Year: 2010

Steven Johnson, the operations manager for ToolingDocs LLC is a manual junkie who loves reading them, criticizes them and collect them. Manuals allow the user to store and utilize a variety of information from different sources more quickly than most people can find it on a computer and pull it up on their screens. They offer flexibility, and for electronic information to work, there must be connectivity between departmental and company systems, or the data is not readily accessible. Mold-manual layout or sections can be generic among molds for the most part, so navigating through the tabs for specific information is easy and learned quickly by repair technicians. Most manuals in use today have a full set of prints, maintenance tips, and hot-runner specs. To keep manuals current and accurate, it is necessary to periodically edit and update the information within. Storing work orders in a manual that is located in the office provides the repair tech and supervisor a chance for a quick overview of planned repairs when handing the manual off.

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