Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology

www.tuat.ac.jp/en/
Tokyo, Japan

Established in 1949 as a national university, Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology , nicknamed "Nōkōdai" or "TUAT", is a research-oriented national university with two campuses, one each located in the cities of Fuchū and Koganei, Tokyo. The undergraduate organization of the university has two faculties, Agriculture and Engineering, and several departments as shown below. Wikipedia.


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Patent
Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology | Date: 2017-01-04

A phase sensitive detection mechanism that uses electrical processing is realized, and an optical detection device, an optical detection method, and a program that are capable of detecting faint light at high speed and with high sensitivity are provided by a simple configuration. A light source section generates a first pulsed light. A filter section transmits a second pulsed light formed from a portion of a frequency spectrum exhibited by the first pulsed light, and reflects a third pulsed light formed from another portion of the frequency spectrum exhibited by the first pulsed light. A phase modulation section phase modulates the second pulsed light at plural phases. A multiplexing section produces a fourth pulsed light by multiplexing the third pulsed light with the second pulsed light phase modulated by the phase modulation section. A detector spectrally disperses and detects scattered light generated by radiating the fourth pulsed light onto a target object. An extraction section uses specific calculation processing to synchronize with the phase modulation in the phase modulation section, so as to extract a frequency spectrum of scattered light scattered based on the second pulsed light phase modulated by the phase modulation section from the frequency spectrum of the scattered light detected by the detector.


Patent
Tamura Corporation, Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology | Date: 2017-03-15

Provided are: a semiconductor substrate comprising a -Ga_(2)O_(3) single crystal, on which an epitaxial layer comprising a -Ga_(2)O_(3) single crystal can be made to grow at a high growth rate using the hydride vapor phase epitaxy (HVPE) method; an epitaxial wafer comprising such semiconductor substrate and epitaxial layer; and a method for manufacturing such epitaxial wafer. As one embodiment of the present invention, provided is a semiconductor substrate (11), used as a base substrate for epitaxial crystal growth by the HVPE method, wherein the semiconductor substrate comprises a -Ga_(2)O_(3)-based single crystal and a plane parallel to the [010] axis of the -Ga_(2)O_(3) single crystal is used as the principal surface.


Photographs of dried colloidal mixtures of polystyrene particles (diameter 1.4 µm) and cellulose fibers (diameter ca. 20 nm, length ca. 1 µm). The polystyrene concentration is fixed at 0.1 wt%, and that of cellulose is 0 (a), 0.01 (b) and 0.1 wt% (c). Credit: National Institute for Materials Science Drying is an important part of printing words and electronics. Particles suspended in liquid are applied to a surface and the liquid evaporates leaving the particles behind. Many times, the particles dry unevenly because of the so-called 'coffee ring effect'. Much like when spilled coffee dries up and leaves behind a hollow ring, particles tend to move to the outside of the liquid droplet. This is a problem, particularly for printed electronics, which require uniform application of a liquid for maximum performance. Cellulose nanofibers offer an environmentally friendly and effective solution to this problem, explain researchers from Japan in a paper recently published in Science and Technology of Advanced Materials. The researchers tested three different concentrations of cellulose nanofibers added to a solution with suspended particles. They also tried increasing the particle concentration in a solution with no added nanofibers. They photographed the drying process under a microscope over time. The solutions with nanofibers dried much more evenly than those without. Instead of a hollow ring, the particles condensed into a solid dot, slightly shrinking in size as the liquid evaporated. Particles in the mixtures with nanofibers also moved at a consistent pace. There was no final rush to the periphery as was observed in the solutions without nanofibers. The researchers conclude that cellulose nanofibers can improve the drying process and avoid problems stemming from uneven drying, such as degradation of paint coatings, clarity of printed characters on paper, and conductivity of printed electronics. Once the solution dries, the nanofibers are left behind along with the desired particles. How the nanofibers impede or benefit material performance is a topic for further research. "The addition of cellulose nanofibers may alter the electrical resistivity of conductive wires in the printed electronics, but the fine tuning of the concentration might be exploited for the control of electric resistivity itself," write the research team from Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, and Nagoya University. Explore further: New hybrid inks for printed, flexible electronics without sintering More information: Yuto Ooi et al. Suppressing the coffee-ring effect of colloidal droplets by dispersed cellulose nanofibers, Science and Technology of Advanced Materials (2017). DOI: 10.1080/14686996.2017.1314776


News Article | May 10, 2017
Site: www.acnnewswire.com

Cellulose nanofibers can help particles in ink and printed electronics disperse evenly, rather than spread apart like dried coffee rings. Drying is an important part of printing words and electronics. Particles suspended in liquid are applied to a surface and the liquid evaporates leaving the particles behind. Many times, the particles dry unevenly because of the so-called 'coffee ring effect'. Much like when spilled coffee dries up and leaves behind a hollow ring, particles tend to move to the outside of the liquid droplet. This is a problem, particularly for printed electronics, which require uniform application of a liquid for maximum performance. Cellulose nanofibers offer an environmentally friendly and effective solution to this problem, explain researchers from Japan in a paper recently published in Science and Technology of Advanced Materials. The researchers tested three different concentrations of cellulose nanofibers added to a solution with suspended particles. They also tried increasing the particle concentration in a solution with no added nanofibers. They photographed the drying process under a microscope over time. The solutions with nanofibers dried much more evenly than those without. Instead of a hollow ring, the particles condensed into a solid dot, slightly shrinking in size as the liquid evaporated. Particles in the mixtures with nanofibers also moved at a consistent pace. There was no final rush to the periphery as was observed in the solutions without nanofibers. The researchers conclude that cellulose nanofibers can improve the drying process and avoid problems stemming from uneven drying, such as degradation of paint coatings, clarity of printed characters on paper, and conductivity of printed electronics. Once the solution dries, the nanofibers are left behind along with the desired particles. How the nanofibers impede or benefit material performance is a topic for further research. "The addition of cellulose nanofibers may alter the electrical resistivity of conductive wires in the printed electronics, but the fine tuning of the concentration might be exploited for the control of electric resistivity itself," write the research team from Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, and Nagoya University. Article information: Yuto Ooi, Itsuo Hanasaki, Daiki Mizumura and Yu Matsuda "Suppressing coffee-ring effect of colloidal droplet by dispersed cellulose nanofibers" Science and Technology of Advanced Materials, 2017, 18:1, 316-324. http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/14686996.2017.1314776 For further information please contact: Itsuo Hanasaki, Institute of Engineering, Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, Naka-cho 2-24-16, Koganei-shi, Tokyo 184-8588 Japan Journal information Science and Technology of Advanced Materials (STAM), http://www.tandfonline.com/stam is an international open access journal in materials science. The journal covers a broad spectrum of topics, including synthesis, processing, theoretical analysis and experimental characterization of materials. Emphasis is placed on the interdisciplinary nature of materials science and on issues at the forefront of the field, such as energy and environmental issues, as well as medical and bioengineering applications. For more information about STAM please contact Mikiko Tanifuji Publishing Director Science and Technology of Advanced Materials E-mail: Press release distributed by ResearchSEA for Science and Technology of Advanced Materials.


Patent
Tamura Corporation, Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology | Date: 2015-05-11

A semiconductor substrate for being used as a base substrate for epitaxial crystal growth by HVPE method includes a -Ga_(2)O_(3)-based single crystal, and a principal surface that is a plane parallel to a [010] axis of the -Ga_(2)O_(3)-based single crystal. An epitaxial wafer includes the semiconductor substrate, and an epitaxial layer that includes a -Ga_(2)O_(3)-based single crystal and is formed on the principal surface of the semiconductor substrate by epitaxial crystal growth using the HVPE method. A method for manufacturing the epitaxial wafer includes forming the epitaxial layer by epitaxial crystal growth using the HVPE method on the semiconductor substrate.


Much like gym enthusiasts, every year Asiatic black bears seem to be on the lookout for protein-rich food ahead of the summer, so that they can bulk up on lean muscle mass in place of the fat tissue formed last year prior to hibernation. This was concluded in a study by Dr. Shino Furusaka, Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology and his team, based on direct observations on bears living across an area of about 60 km2 in Japan. The study is published in the open access journal ZooKeys. In order to determine the bears' food preferences and habits, the scientists followed a large number of animals in the Ashio area of the Ashio-Nikko Mountains in Japan from April to July in both 2013 and 2014. To avoid unnecessary intrusion, they stayed at a distance of at least 200 metres using video cameras with telescopic lenses to document the sightings. Having documented the plant species the bears consumed, the researchers studied their nutritional content and made conclusions about the nutrients needed for the species after hibernation. While heavily dependent on food availability, generally the bears were noted to prefer food which is high in protein, but poor in fibre -- likely because their stomachs and intestines were unable to efficiently digest the latter. Furthermore, the protein-rich diet ensures that the muscle mass is rebuilt to replace the lost winter fat. Interestingly, the bears were observed to change their food preferences as spring progressed and that seemed to be linked to the shifts in the nutritional value of the available food. Starting with their observations at the beginning of April, the scientists did not record any feeding behaviour until the end of the month. As leaf flush was yet to occur, the animals were active and feeding on overwintered grass. However, in early May, the bears began consuming newly emerged leaves, grass and, later in the month, they added flowers to their menu. A shift in behaviour occurred in the following months. In June and July, the bears were seen to feed mainly on ants, with a small portion of their food intake consisting of grasses, sika deer carcasses and bees. Curiously, when the scientists looked into the nutritional content of the same plants which the animals sought only a few weeks ago, they found out that now they were significantly poorer in protein and richer in fibre. Another finding showed that the calories in the different items were not related to the choice of food which likely proves that the key factor is none other than the amount of protein, provided that the fibre value is low enough for good digestibility. Understanding the food preferences and habits of animals, as well as the reasons behind them, is essential for the development and revision of habitat management plans. However, previous knowledge of the feeding behaviour of Asiatic black bears has been based solely on faecal analyses which has not provided sufficient details on which nutritional factors influence the use of particular foods. Furusaka S, Kozakai C, Nemoto Y, Umemura Y, Naganuma T, Yamazaki K, Koike S (2017) The selection by the Asiatic black bear (Ursus thibetanus) of spring plant food items according to their nutritional values. ZooKeys 672: 121-133. https:/


A young bear yawning on top of a rock in the Ashio-Nikko mountains. Credit: Hiroshi Yokota Much like gym enthusiasts, every year Asiatic black bears seem to be on the lookout for protein-rich food ahead of the summer, so that they can bulk up on lean muscle mass in place of the fat tissue formed last year prior to hibernation. This was concluded in a study by Dr. Shino Furusaka, Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology and his team, based on direct observations on bears living across an area of about 60 km2 in Japan. The study is published in the open access journal ZooKeys. In order to determine the bears' food preferences and habits, the scientists followed a large number of animals in the Ashio area of the Ashio-Nikko Mountains in Japan from April to July in both 2013 and 2014. To avoid unnecessary intrusion, they stayed at a distance of at least 200 metres using video cameras with telescopic lenses to document the sightings. Having documented the plant species the bears consumed, the researchers studied their nutritional content and made conclusions about the nutrients needed for the species after hibernation. While heavily dependent on food availability, generally the bears were noted to prefer food which is high in protein, but poor in fibre—likely because their stomachs and intestines were unable to efficiently digest the latter. Furthermore, the protein-rich diet ensures that the muscle mass is rebuilt to replace the lost winter fat. Interestingly, the bears were observed to change their food preferences as spring progressed and that seemed to be linked to the shifts in the nutritional value of the available food. Starting with their observations at the beginning of April, the scientists did not record any feeding behaviour until the end of the month. As leaf flush was yet to occur, the animals were active and feeding on overwintered grass. However, in early May, the bears began consuming newly emerged leaves, grass and, later in the month, they added flowers to their menu. A shift in behaviour occurred in the following months. In June and July, the bears were seen to feed mainly on ants, with a small portion of their food intake consisting of grasses, sika deer carcasses and bees. Curiously, when the scientists looked into the nutritional content of the same plants which the animals sought only a few weeks ago, they found out that now they were significantly poorer in protein and richer in fibre. Another finding showed that the calories in the different items were not related to the choice of food which likely proves that the key factor is none other than the amount of protein, provided that the fibre value is low enough for good digestibility. Understanding the food preferences and habits of animals, as well as the reasons behind them, is essential for the development and revision of habitat management plans. However, previous knowledge of the feeding behaviour of Asiatic black bears has been based solely on faecal analyses which has not provided sufficient details on which nutritional factors influence the use of particular foods. Explore further: Availability of human food shortens and disrupts bears' hibernation More information: Shino Furusaka et al, The selection by the Asiatic black bear (Ursus thibetanus) of spring plant food items according to their nutritional values, ZooKeys (2017). DOI: 10.3897/zookeys.672.10078


Patent
Toyota Jidosha Kabushiki Kaisha, Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology | Date: 2017-06-28

The invention relates to a fluid transport pipe. A first unit channel (12a) in which a channel cross-sectional area continuously decreases toward a downstream side and a second unit channel (12b) in which a channel cross-sectional area continuously increases toward the downstream side are alternately combined. A ratio A (= L/{[Smax]1/2- [Smin]1/2}) is set within a range in which a drag reduction rate RDbecomes a positive value. The fluid transport pipe includes: a first opening (22a) formed in a channel wall of the first unit channel; a second opening (22b) formed in a channel wall of the second unit channel; and a bypass channel (20) that allows by-passing of a flow from the first unit channel to the second unit channel through the openings.


Patent
Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology | Date: 2017-07-05

There has been a problem that because the size of an adsorption reactor is very big, the conventional adsorption chiller which uses six adsorption reactors becomes very big, and a wide installation space is needed. An adsorption chiller comprising an evaporator which generates cold heat by vaporizing a liquefied refrigerant, a first adsorption reaction section which adsorbs the vaporized refrigerant generated from the evaporator and then vaporizes the refrigerant again, a second adsorption reaction section which adsorbs the vaporized refrigerant generated from the first adsorption reaction section and then vaporizes the refrigerant again, and a condenser which, by cooling and liquefying the vaporized refrigerant generated from the second adsorption reaction section, supplies the refrigerant to the evaporator, wherein at least one of the first adsorption reaction section and the second adsorption reaction section includes at least two adsorption reactors, a first coupling pipe which couples the two adsorption reactors, and a first control valve which controls opening and closing of the first coupling pipe.


To provide a method for producing a Group III element nitride crystal by growing it on a plane on the -c-plane side as a crystal growth plane. The present invention is a method for producing a Group III element nitride crystal, including a vapor phase growth step of growing a Group III element nitride crystal 12 on a crystal growth plane of a Group III element nitride seed crystal 11 by vapor deposition. The vapor phase growth step is a step of causing a Group III metal, an oxidant, and a nitrogen-containing gas to react with one another to grow the Group III element nitride crystal 12 or includes: a reduced product gas generation step of causing a Group III element oxide and a reducing gas to react with each other to generate a gas of a reduced product of the Group III element oxide; and a crystal generation step of causing the gas of the reduced product and a nitrogen-containing gas to react with each other to generate the Group III element nitride crystal 12. The crystal growth plane is a plane on the -c-plane side. A crystal growth temperature is 1200C or more. In the vapor phase growth step, the Group III element nitride crystal is grown in an approximately -c direction.

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