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Yoshinogawa, Japan

Matsuura T.,Tokushima University | Kashiwaguchi S.,Tokyo Kosei Nenkin Hospital | Iwase T.,Tokushima National Hospital | Enishi T.,Tokyo Kosei Nenkin Hospital | Yasui N.,Tokyo Kosei Nenkin Hospital
American Journal of Sports Medicine | Year: 2010

Background: Previously published reports present a variety of nonoperative and operative treatments for a persistent olecranon physis. However, the radiographic indication for the operative treatment is not clear. Hypothesis: Our radiographic classification of persistent olecranon physis is helpful in formulating treatment decisions. Study Design: Cohort study; Level of evidence, 3. Methods: Sixteen male baseball players with persistent olecranon physis were retrospectively evaluated. The mean age at first presentation was 14.7 years (range, 12-17 years). The lesion was classified into 2 stages based on radiographic appearance. Stage I demonstrated widening of the olecranon epiphyseal plate when compared with the contralateral elbow on the lateral view. Sclerotic change indicated stage II. All patients underwent nonoperative treatment for at least 3 months. Follow-up radiographs were taken at 1-month intervals. Operative treatment was provided to the patients whose condition had failed to improve after nonoperative treatment. Results: Of the 16 patients, 12 had stage I lesions and 4 had stage II lesions. Nonoperative management produced healing in 91.7% of patients with stage I lesions and none of the patients with stage II lesions. Conclusion: Our radiographic classification of persistent olecranon physis is useful for treatment decision making. In addition, our results demonstrated that sclerotic change is a high predictive indicator of the need for operative treatment. Source


Arii Y.,Tokushima National Hospital | Arii Y.,Tokushima University
Journal of neurology, neurosurgery, and psychiatry | Year: 2014

CONCLUSIONS: We found an immediate beneficial effect of rTSMS on camptocormia in PD patients. Although the effect was transient, this successful trial justifies further studies to test if repeated rTSMS treatments can induce longer term improvements in camptocormia associated with PD.CLINICAL TRIAL REGISTRATION: UMIN Clinical Trials Registry: UMIN000011495.OBJECTIVES: Spinal cord stimulation is a potential therapeutic option for the treatment of Parkinson's disease (PD)-associated symptoms. Repetitive trans-spinal magnetic stimulation (rTSMS) is a non-invasive and safe alternative for stimulation of spinal pathways that has not been studied for therapeutic efficacy in PD. We assessed the benefits of rTSMS on camptocormia, an often treatment-resistant postural abnormality observed in PD patients.METHODS: We compared rTSMS to sham stimulation in PD patients with camptocormia in a single-centre, randomised, single-blind, crossover, placebo-controlled study. PD patients with camptocormia were administered a single trial of rTSMS (a train of 40 stimuli) or sham treatment followed 1 week later by the alternate treatment. Primary outcome measure was thoracolumbar spine flexion angle in the standing position immediately after the trial.RESULTS: Of 320 PD patients examined, 37 had concomitant camptocormia and were randomly assigned to either the rTSMS first group (n=19) or sham first group (n=18). Flexion angle in the standing position decreased by a mean of 10.9° (95% CI 8.1 to 13.65) after rTSMS but remained unchanged after sham stimulation (mean, -0.1°; 95% CI -0.95 to 0.71). The flexion angle while sitting (secondary outcome) decreased by 8.1° (95% CI 5.89 to 10.25) after rTSMS, whereas sham treatment had no significant effect (mean, -0.8°; 95% CI -1.62 to 0.05). Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions. Source


Suzue N.,Tokushima University | Matsuura T.,Tokushima University | Iwame T.,Tokushima Prefectural Central Hospital | Hamada D.,Tokushima University | And 4 more authors.
Journal of Medical Investigation | Year: 2014

Objective: To investigate the prevalence of osteochondrosis in children and adolescent soccer players. Materials and Methods: A questionnaire was distributed to players of all 113 junior soccer teams participating in a regional summer championship in August 2012 inquiring about pain in the body during or after training or a match. Physical examination of the lumbar spine or legs was recommended to players who complained of pain on the questionnaire, and for those who had positive findings on the physical examination, radiographic or ultrasonic examination at our hospital was recommended. Results: Questionnaires were collected from 1162 players of 97 teams, and 547 players (47.1%) complained of pain in the lumbar spine or legs. Physical examination was performed on 494 players, 394 of whom were referred for physical examination (79.8%). Of these 494 players, 20 (4.0%) had positive lumbar spine findings, 26 (5.3%) had hip findings, 198 (40.1%) had knee findings, 117 (23.7%) had ankle findings, 226 (45.7%) had heel findings, and 90 had findings in other parts of foot (18.2%). Radiographic or ultrasonic examination was performed in 106 (26.9%) players at our hospital and 80 (75.5%) players were diagnosed with osteochondrosis. Sever’s disease was diagnosed in 49 players, Osgood-Schlatter disease in 13, bipartite patella was in 12, Sinding-Larsen-Johansson disease in 10, osteochondritis dissecans of the distal femur in 1, and spondylolysis in 3. Conclusions: The majority of players who had experienced pain and were found to have osteochondrosis had severe injuries such as osteochondritis dissecans or lumbar spondylolysis. We suggest many of the players involved in this study receive further radiographic or ultrasonic examination. © 2014 by The University of Tokushima Faculty of Medicine. Source


Kanematsu Y.,Tokushima National Hospital | Matsuura T.,Tokushima University | Kashiwaguchi S.,Tokyo Shinjuku Medical Center | Iwase T.,Tokushima National Hospital | And 3 more authors.
Skeletal Radiology | Year: 2015

Results: At the first examination, radiographs showed a wider epiphyseal plate of the throwing side compared with the asymptomatic contralateral shoulder. Healing was observed in all cases. Healing occurred first along the medial side and was then extended laterally. The mean time required for healing was 4.7 months. All patients were able to return to playing baseball at their pre-injury level of play and were asymptomatic when examined at the final follow-up.Objective: Little Leaguer’s shoulder is a syndrome involving the proximal humeral epiphyseal plate. Conservative treatment usually resolves the symptoms. However, there are no reports of a radiographic follow-up study of this disease. The purpose of this study was to show the radiographic healing process of Little Leaguer’s shoulder.Materials and methods: A total of 19 male baseball players diagnosed as having Little Leaguer’s shoulder were retrospectively evaluated. The mean age at first presentation was 12.7 years. External rotation anteroposterior radiographs of the shoulder were taken. All patients were treated with rest from throwing, and no throwing was recommended until remodeling was confirmed. Follow-up radiographs were taken at 1-month intervals to assess healing. All patients were observed until healing was confirmed radiographically, after which they returned to baseball. The mean follow-up period was 8.5 months. In addition to radiography, patients were asked whether they had any symptoms and whether they had been able to return to baseball.Conclusion: The healing process of Little Leaguer’s shoulder advanced from medial to lateral, and healing was achieved about 5 months after initial examination. © 2014, ISS. Source


Arii Y.,Tokushima National Hospital | Sawada Y.,Tokushima National Hospital | Kawamura K.,Tokushima National Hospital | Miyake S.,Tokushima National Hospital | And 6 more authors.
Journal of Neurology, Neurosurgery and Psychiatry | Year: 2014

Objectives Spinal cord stimulation is a potential therapeutic option for the treatment of Parkinson's disease (PD)-associated symptoms. Repetitive trans-spinal magnetic stimulation (rTSMS) is a non-invasive and safe alternative for stimulation of spinal pathways that has not been studied for therapeutic efficacy in PD. We assessed the benefits of rTSMS on camptocormia, an often treatment-resistant postural abnormality observed in PD patients. Methods We compared rTSMS to sham stimulation in PD patients with camptocormia in a single-centre, randomised, single-blind, crossover, placebo-controlled study. PD patients with camptocormia were administered a single trial of rTSMS (a train of 40 stimuli) or sham treatment followed 1 week later by the alternate treatment. Primary outcome measure was thoracolumbar spine flexion angle in the standing position immediately after the trial. Results Of 320 PD patients examined, 37 had concomitant camptocormia and were randomly assigned to either the rTSMS first group (n=19) or sham first group (n=18). Flexion angle in the standing position decreased by a mean of 10.9° (95% CI 8.1 to 13.65) after rTSMS but remained unchanged after sham stimulation (mean, -0.1°; 95% CI -0.95 to 0.71). The flexion angle while sitting (secondary outcome) decreased by 8.1° (95% CI 5.89 to 10.25) after rTSMS, whereas sham treatment had no significant effect (mean, -0.8°; 95% CI -1.62 to 0.05). Conclusions We found an immediate beneficial effect of rTSMS on camptocormia in PD patients. Although the effect was transient, this successful trial justifies further studies to test if repeated rTSMS treatments can induce longer term improvements in camptocormia associated with PD. © 2014 by the BMJ Publishing Group Ltd. Source

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