Hiratsuka, Japan
Hiratsuka, Japan

Tokai University is a private university in Tokyo, Japan. It was established in 1943 by Shigeyoshi Matsumae, who had formerly been the engineering president of the Ministry of Communications. The Shonan Campus was established in the 1960s.Tōkai University is unique amongst Japanese universities in referring to its faculties as "schools." Special features of the university include the Department of Nordic Studies, including instruction in languages. The university also offers pilot training in cooperation with All Nippon Airways. The university has focused particularly on the science and engineering, as the founder believed that "After the war, development and the peaceful use of the science and technology were necessary for the development of Japan where the resource was scarce" About 60 percent of students enrolled in those schools. Between 1994 and 2004, Tōkai University led all universities in Japan in the registration of new patents. Wikipedia.


Time filter

Source Type

Patent
Tokai University and Toray Industries Inc | Date: 2015-04-20

A polymer laminate has 2-100 layers each containing a biodegradable resin and having a thickness of 10 nm-400 nm that are laminated, the thickness of at least one of the outermost layers is 10 nm-180 nm, and the outermost layers are joined to each other. A polymer laminate excellent in biocompatibility and mechanical strength and suitable to medical applications such as wound dressings and antiadhesive materials can be obtained.


Patent
Tokai University and Toray Industries Inc | Date: 2017-03-01

The present invention provides a polymer laminate in which 2-100 layers each containing a biodegradable resin and having a thickness of 10 nm-400 nm are laminated, the thickness of at least one of the outermost layers is 10 nm-180 nm, and the outermost layers are joined to each other. By the present invention, a polymer laminate excellent in biocompatibility and mechanical strength and suitable to medical applications such as wound dressings and antiadhesive materials can be obtained.


News Article | May 16, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

BOSTON (May 15, 2017, 3 pm EDT)--A study in mice finds that development of age-related macular degeneration (AMD) could be arrested by switching from a high-glycemic diet (starches as are found in white bread) to a low-glycemic (starches found in whole grains). For the same amount of total carbohydrate, high-glycemic diets release sugar into the blood stream more rapidly than low-glycemic diets. Researchers at the Jean Mayer USDA Human Nutrition Research Center on Aging at Tufts University also believe that the study, published in PNAS, points to potential biomarkers of AMD. These can be used to predict when a person is at risk for this disease, which is the leading cause of vision loss in adults over the age of 50. In early stages, AMD results in blurred vision. In advanced stages, AMD can make life very challenging. The National Eye Institute estimates that the number of people with AMD will double by 2050, from 2.07 million to 5.44 million. In the United States, white Americans are most likely to develop AMD and, in 2010, 2.5 percent of white adults aged 50 and older had AMD. The disease is typically diagnosed only when vision loss has already begun. Unfortunately, there is no cure. Using an aged mouse model, the researchers randomized 59 mice into two groups: 19 low-glycemic fed mice and 40 high-glycemic fed mice. The diets differed only in carbohydrate source. Carbohydrates comprised 45 percent of the diet in both cases. The carbohydrate source varied in the ratio of amylose and amylopectin, the two starches used for this work. The high-glycemic starch was 100 percent amylopectin while low-glycemic starch was 70 percent amylose and 30 percent amylopectin. After six months, the high-glycemic group of mice either remained on the high-glycemic diet or were switched to the low-glycemic diet. The researchers observed that a high-glycemic diet resulted in the development of many AMD features, including loss of function of cells at the back of the eye called retinal pigmented epithelial atrophy (RPE) and of the cells that capture light, called photoreceptors - precursors to dry AMD - whereas a low-glycemic diet did not. Importantly, switching from a high-glycemic diet to a low-glycemic diet arrested damage to the retina. "We were genuinely surprised that the retinas from mice whose diets were switched from high- to low-glycemic index diets midway through the study were indistinguishable from those fed low-glycemic index diet throughout the study. We hadn't anticipated that dietary change might repair the accumulated damage in the RPE so effectively. Our experimental results suggest that switching from a high-glycemic diet to a low-glycemic one is beneficial to eye health in people that are heading towards developing AMD," said lead author Sheldon Rowan, Ph.D., scientist in the Laboratory for Nutrition and Vision Research at the Jean Mayer USDA Human Nutrition Research Center on Aging at Tufts University. The researchers also identified potential biomarkers of AMD features. Such biomarkers can be used to predict who will get the disease. The biomarkers included advanced glycation end products (AGEs) that are formed when sugar metabolites react with proteins. They also included oxidized fats, C3-carnitine and serotonin levels. The low-glycemic diet limited the accumulation of AGEs and the oxidation of long-chain polyunsaturated fats. AGEs can be a factor in aging and the development of many degenerative diseases, in addition to AMD. Fat oxidation results in the degradation of fats in cell membranes, which can lead to cell damage. The researchers also found that higher levels of C3-carnitine and serotonin in the blood were related to consuming the low-glycemic index diet and less AMD features. C3-carnitine, also known as propionylcarnitine, plays a role in fatty acid metabolism in cells and is found in many low-glycemic foods, such as whole wheat and legumes. Serotonin is made in the intestine, in response to signals that are produced by microbes in the gut. The researchers showed that the composition of gut microbes, collectively called the gut microbiome, changes in response to the diet. Higher serotonin levels are associated with retinal health and reduced frequency of AMD features. The researchers identified several other metabolites that were associated with protection from AMD and with the composition of the gut microbiome, which together led the authors to speculate on a potential gut-retina axis that may communicate diet to eye health. Altogether, the findings suggest that changes in metabolism associated with the different glycemia diets, AGEs accumulation, production and oxidation of fats, and C3-carnitine and serotonin levels are related to development of AMD features. These findings add to a growing body of research on the relation between dietary carbohydrate control and the development of AMD, led by senior author Allen Taylor, Ph.D., senior scientist and director of the Laboratory for Nutrition and Vision Research at the Jean Mayer USDA Human Nutrition Research Center on Aging at Tufts University. Taylor holds secondary positions as professor of ophthalmology at Tufts University School of Medicine and also serves as faculty in the Biochemistry and Cell, Molecular & Developmental Biology programs at the Sackler School of Graduate Biomedical Sciences at Tufts. "Currently, there are no early biomarkers to anticipate the disease. Our findings show an interaction between dietary carbohydrates, the gut microbiome, specific biochemical molecules, and AMD features. This work should lead to new approaches to understand, diagnose and treat early AMD - perhaps before it affects vision. Already anticipated by our human epidemiologic studies, the findings imply that we can develop dietary interventions aimed at preventing the progression of AMD, a disease which impacts millions and costs billions worldwide," said Taylor. "Clinical tests are already available to test for some of these potential biomarkers. A screening of C3-carnitine levels is a standard part of the newborn screening profile, so it would not be challenging to adapt the existing screening to evaluate levels in AMD. There are also efficient clinical measures for serotonin. AGEs, however, are still emerging biomarkers, and have not been used on large-scale human studies yet. Even so, AGEs are among the most exciting potential AMD biomarkers, since we understand their damaging molecular effects very clearly," added Rowan. In order to accomplish this work, Taylor assembled an international team comprised of Shuhong Jiang, Min-Lee Chang, Jason Szelog, Kalavathi Dasuri, and Donald Smith of the Jean Mayer USDA Human Nutrition Research Center on Aging at Tufts University; Tal Korem, Adina Weinberger, Tali Avnit-Sagi, Maya Lotan-Pompan, Eran Segal, and Jedrzej Szymanski of the Weizmann Institute of Science; Christa Cassalman, Christina McGuire and James D. Baleja of Tufts University School of Medicine; Ryoji Nagai, of Tokai University; Xue-Liang Du and Michael Brownlee of Albert Einstein College of Medicine; Naila Rabbani and Paul J. Thornalley of the University of Warwick; and Amy A. Deik, Kerry Pierce, Justin M. Scott, and Clary B. Clish of the Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard. This work was supported by awards from the National Eye Institute of the National Institutes of Health (EY13250, EY021212 and EY026979) and by the U.S. Department of Agriculture's Agricultural Research Service. Rowan, S., Jiang, S., Korem, T., Szymanski, J., Chang, M., Szelog, J., Cassalman, C., Dasuri, K., McGuire, C., Nagai, R., Du, X., Brownlee, M., Rabbani, N., Thornalley, P.J., Baleja, J.D., Deik, A.A., Pierce, K., Scott, J.M., Clish, C.B., Smith, D., Weinberger, A., Avnit-Sagi, T., Lotan-Pompan, M., Segal, E., Taylor, A.. Involvement of a gut-eye axis in protection against dietary glycemia induced early age-related macular degeneration. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. Published online May 15, 2017. DOI and link to access: http://www. For three decades, the Jean Mayer USDA Human Nutrition Research Center on Aging at Tufts University has studied the relationship between good nutrition and good health in aging populations. Tufts research scientists work with federal agencies to establish the Dietary Guidelines, the Dietary Reference Intakes, and other significant public policies. The Gerald J. and Dorothy R. Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy at Tufts University is the only independent school of nutrition in the United States. The school's eight degree programs ­ which focus on questions relating to nutrition and chronic diseases, molecular nutrition, agriculture and sustainability, food security, humanitarian assistance, public health nutrition, and food policy and economics ­ are renowned for the application of scientific research to national and international policy.


News Article | May 19, 2017
Site: www.sciencedaily.com

A study published May 17 in the journal Genome Biology shows how highly popular, custom genetically engineered animal models are easily generated using a new patent-pending technology called Easi-CRISPR. Easi-CRISPR allows researchers to create these much-needed animal models at previously unheard of rates and significantly lower cost. "With Easi-CRISPR, creating knock-in mice is as simple as using 'Find' and 'Edit' in Microsoft Word," said Paula Turpen, Ph.D., director for research resources at the University of Nebraska Medical Center. Dr. Turpen likened previous genetic-engineering methods to reading through a manuscript and making changes with a manual typewriter and a bottle of liquid "Wite-Out." Channabasavaiah Gurumurthy, Ph.D., M.V.S.C. (D.V.M.), assistant professor of developmental neuroscience at UNMC's Munroe-Meyer Institute, is primary investigator. Building off the CRISPR-Cas genome editing methods, Easi (efficient additions with ssDNA inserts)-CRISPR is the crucial next step in genome engineering to create designer animal models. These models help scientists study the role of genes and mutations in human diseases, and explore the use of gene therapy and other potential treatments. CRISPR was a groundbreaking advance, allowing scientists to "cut" individual genes from a genome as a replacement for creating "knockout" models. But "knocking in" a new DNA cassette, or generating more complicated conditional knockouts -- which comprise over 90 percent of animal models needed by scientists -- still proved inefficient, challenging and expensive. A recent Science Magazine news article captured the frustration of the research community about the limitations of the available CRISPR methods. Easi-CRISPR, by contrast, enables the insertion of long DNA sequences into CRISPR-cut genomes at efficiencies of up to 100 percent. Dr. Gurumurthy said increased efficiencies are the result of inserting long single-stranded DNA, rather than double-stranded DNA. The idea came to his long-term collaborator, Masato Ohtsuka, Ph.D., of Japan's Tokai University, while the two scientists were literally scribbling on a napkin at a conference in 2014. Dr. Gurumurthy said several independent labs have already been able to reproduce the Easi-CRISPR study's results, thanks to its early online posting on the preprint server BioRxiv. Easi-CRISPR is the result of an international collaboration between seven institutions, headed by Drs. Gurumurthy and Ohtsuka, with Dr. Suzanne Mansour of the University of Utah as a major collaborator. The collaboration includes Integrated DNA Technologies (IDT), a global leader in custom nucleic acid synthesis and genome editing products, based in Coralville, Iowa. "The present study demonstrates how efficiently DNA sequences can be introduced into a genome using long single-stranded DNA combined with Cas9 protein," Mark Behlke, M.D., Ph.D., IDT's chief scientific officer, said. "We are excited to help advance this field with our products. The work presented here should be of high interest to everyone generating animal models using CRISPR technology."


News Article | May 19, 2017
Site: www.rdmag.com

A study published May 17 in the journal Genome Biology shows how highly popular, custom genetically engineered animal models are easily generated using a new patent-pending technology called Easi-CRISPR. Easi-CRISPR allows researchers to create these much-needed animal models at previously unheard of rates and significantly lower cost. “With Easi-CRISPR, creating knock-in mice is as simple as using ‘Find’ and ‘Edit’ in Microsoft Word,” said Paula Turpen, Ph.D., director for research resources at the University of Nebraska Medical Center. Dr. Turpen likened previous genetic-engineering methods to reading through a manuscript and making changes with a manual typewriter and a bottle of liquid “Wite-Out.” Channabasavaiah Gurumurthy, Ph.D., M.V.S.C. (D.V.M.), assistant professor of developmental neuroscience at UNMC’s Munroe-Meyer Institute, is primary investigator. Building off the CRISPR-Cas genome editing methods, Easi (efficient additions with ssDNA inserts)-CRISPR is the crucial next step in genome engineering to create designer animal models. These models help scientists study the role of genes and mutations in human diseases, and explore the use of gene therapy and other potential treatments. CRISPR was a groundbreaking advance, allowing scientists to “cut” individual genes from a genome as a replacement for creating “knockout” models. But “knocking in” a new DNA cassette, or generating more complicated conditional knockouts – which comprise over 90 percent of animal models needed by scientists – still proved inefficient, challenging and expensive. A recent Science Magazine news article captured the frustration of the research community about the limitations of the available CRISPR methods. Easi-CRISPR, by contrast, enables the insertion of long DNA sequences into CRISPR-cut genomes at efficiencies of up to 100 percent. Dr. Gurumurthy said increased efficiencies are the result of inserting long single-stranded DNA, rather than double-stranded DNA. The idea came to his long-term collaborator, Masato Ohtsuka, Ph.D., of Japan’s Tokai University, while the two scientists were literally scribbling on a napkin at a conference in 2014. Dr. Gurumurthy said several independent labs have already been able to reproduce the Easi-CRISPR study’s results, thanks to its early online posting on the preprint server BioRxiv. Easi-CRISPR is the result of an international collaboration between seven institutions, headed by Drs. Gurumurthy and Ohtsuka, with Dr. Suzanne Mansour of the University of Utah as a major collaborator. The collaboration includes Integrated DNA Technologies (IDT), a global leader in custom nucleic acid synthesis and genome editing products, based in Coralville, Iowa. “The present study demonstrates how efficiently DNA sequences can be introduced into a genome using long single-stranded DNA combined with Cas9 protein,” Mark Behlke, M.D., Ph.D., IDT’s chief scientific officer, said. “We are excited to help advance this field with our products. The work presented here should be of high interest to everyone generating animal models using CRISPR technology.”


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-CSA | Phase: Fission-2013-3.4.1 | Award Amount: 5.53M | Year: 2013

COMET will strengthen the pan-European research initiative on the impact of radiation on man and the environment by facilitating the integration of radioecological research. COMET will build upon the foundations laid by the European Radioecology Alliance (ALLIANCE) and the on-going FP7 STAR Network of Excellence in radioecology. By collaborating with the European platforms on nuclear and radiological emergency response (NERIS) and low dose risk research (MELODI), COMET will significantly aid preparation for the implementation of the Horizon 2020 umbrella structure for Radiation Protection. In close association with STAR and the ALLIANCE, COMET will take forward the development of a Strategic Research Agenda as the basis for developing innovative mechanisms for joint programming and implementation (JPI) of radioecological research. To facilitate and foster future integration under a common federating structure, research activities developed within COMET will be targeted at radioecological research needs that will help achieve priorities of the NERIS and MELODI platforms. These research activities will be initiated in collaboration with researchers from countries where major nuclear accidents have occurred. Flexible funds, unallocated to specific tasks at project initiation, have been included within the COMET budget to facilitate RTD activities identified through the JPI mechanisms developed that are of joint interest to the ALLIANCE, NERIS and MELODI. It will also strengthen the bridge with the non-radiation community. Furthermore, COMET will develop strong mechanisms for knowledge exchange, dissemination and training to enhance and maintain European capacity, competence and skills in radioecology. The COMET consortium has 13 partners, expanding from the organisations within the FP7 STAR project. In particular, COMET partners from countries which have experienced major nuclear accidents (i.e. Ukraine and Japan) and/or who hold Observatory sites.


Patent
Foundation For Biomedical Research And Innovation, Tokai University, Stemmed Inc. and Juntendo Educational Foundation | Date: 2015-08-05

Simplification of a preparation step of a cell population used for the treatment of ischemic diseases, and provision of a cell population that shows more effect by the treatment. A method of producing a cell population wherein a vascular endothelial progenitor cell and/or an anti-inflammatory macrophage are/is enriched, including cultivating a mononuclear cell derived from bone marrow, cord blood or peripheral blood in a serum-free medium containing stem cell factor, interleukin-6, FMS-like tyrosine kinase 3 ligand, thrombopoietin and vascular endothelial cell growth factor, and proliferating vascular endothelial progenitor cell from the cell; and a cell population obtained by the method, etc.


Patent
Tokai University and Nissan Chemical Industries Ltd. | Date: 2016-08-31

There is a method for producing an optical waveguide composing an optical path conversion component having an extremely low signal loss, allowing a high surface packaging density and high speed operation, and allowing high productivity. A method for producing an optical waveguide that propagates light from a surface of a support to an oblique direction not vertical to the surface, the method for producing an optical waveguide comprising the steps of: (1) providing an anti-reflective coating on the support; (2) placing a photosensitive resin composition on the anti-reflective coating, and exposing the photosensitive resin composition to a light ray entering from a direction non-vertical to the surface of the support through a photomask for curing the composition; and (3) removing the unexposed photosensitive resin composition by development; and an optical waveguide obtained by the method.

Loading Tokai University collaborators
Loading Tokai University collaborators