Toho Water Authority

Kissimmee, FL, United States

Toho Water Authority

Kissimmee, FL, United States
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Talton E.,Reiss Engineering Inc. | Megic B.J.,Liquid Solutions Group LLC | Felblinger K.,City of St. Cloud | Beatty D.,Toho Water Authority | And 6 more authors.
World Environmental and Water Resources Congress 2015: Floods, Droughts, and Ecosystems - Proceedings of the 2015 World Environmental and Water Resources Congress | Year: 2015

Five major Central Florida utilities came together to cost effectively develop and share a regionally significant alternative water supply source: brackish groundwater from the Lower Floridan aquifer near Cypress Lake in southern Osceola County. This paper summarizes the conceptual design for the transmission and optimization of the Cypress Lake Project water supply in concert with existing potable water sources to facilitate the efficient transfer and transmission of potable water among the five utilities. The primary goal of this project was to develop a cost effective and reliable strategy to "wheel" existing water supplies between the utilities and transmit and integrate water from the Cypress Lake Project into the Utilities potable water distribution systems. In 2007, the City of St. Cloud (STC), Toho Water Authority (TWA), Orange County Utilities (OCU), Polk County Utilities (PCU), and Reedy Creek Improvement District (RCID) initiated planning for the Cypress Lake Project and were subsequently issued a 30-year 37.5 million gallons per day (MGD) water use permit by the South Florida Water Management District to withdraw groundwater from the Cypress Lake wellfield. To further the cooperation in 2011, an interlocal agreement was executed establishing the Water Cooperative of Central Florida with STC, TWA, OCU and PCU as members. The Water Cooperative of Central Florida, together with RCID, have completed a conceptual design of the Cypress Lake Project transmission system to deliver 30 to 36 MGD of finished (potable) water, considering the estimated recovery associated with lowering the dissolved solids of the brackish supply. This overview discusses how the challenge of evaluating the future water supply and transmission needs of five collective utilities while maintaining individuality and unique hydraulic and water quality constraints was met. Another key challenge was estimating the capacity of existing facilities to supply future peak flows for a potentially average flow (base-loaded) supply from the Cypress Lake Project. These challenges were met through the development of two innovative modeling applications: (1) a regional hydraulic model of the five utilities' potable water distribution systems, and (2) a water supply model to predict the peak demand and conjunctive use needs of the project. These tools were used to provide the Water Cooperative of Central Florida key information to make informed, evidence-based decisions regarding project directives. This effort demonstrates that by proactively and regionally cooperating to achieve optimal use of existing supply sources while efficiently integrating alternative water supplies, the Water Cooperative of Central Florida utilities are saving millions of dollars compared to implementing individual transmission systems to convey water from the Cypress Lake Project. © 2015 ASCE.


Vitasovic Z.C.,Metropolitan Water District of Southern California | Olsson G.,Lund University | Liner B.,Aldera LLC | Sweeney M.,Toho Water Authority
Journal - American Water Works Association | Year: 2015

The utility analysis and integration model (UAIM) is a proposed business reference model that offers a structured framework to help utilities succeed on the enterprise level by facilitating the coordination and integration of people, process, and technology. The UAIM describes how a utility works and is proposed as a high-level business reference model for the water and wastewater industry. The goal of UAIM is to break down the large problem of managing a utility into smaller components, to enhance understanding of the issues that utilities must consider, and to provide a framework for analyses and improvement. An important goal of UAIM is to facilitate the development of enterprise solutions by providing a systematic approach that fully considers the interactions between people, processes, and technology on all levels of business processes. To apply UAIM to a specific utility, the content of each box needs to be configured: boxes of the model have to be filled in with the specific details applicable to that utility. Information is collected about all nine boxes of UAIM. This activity includes collecting and mapping information about different aspects that affect utility performance. UAIM will not instantly transform the problem of managing a utility from art to science, but it will provide a structure that allows utilities to start moving in that direction.


Sweeney M.W.,Toho Water Authority | Kabouris J.C.,CH2M HILL
Water Environment Research | Year: 2014

A review of the literature published in 2013 on topics relating to water resource recovery facilities (WRRF) in the areas of modeling, instrumentation, automation and optimization of wastewater treatment is presented. Note that WEF has adopted the term 'WRRF' replacing such previous terms as publicly owned treatment works, wastewater treatment plant, and other conventional terms and officially instituted this change in its publications beginning in 2012. It is anticipated the replaced terms will remain in use by other publications and authors for some time. Copyright © 2014 Water Environment Federation.


Sweeney M.W.,Toho Water Authority | Kabouris J.C.,Toho Water Authority
Water Environment Research | Year: 2016

A review of the literature published in 2015 on topics relating to water resource recovery facilities (WRRF) in the areas of modeling, automation, measurement and sensors and optimization of wastewater treatment (or water resource reclamation) is presented. © 2016 Water Environment Federation.


Sweeney M.W.,Toho Water Authority | Kabouris J.C.,CH2M HILL
Water Environment Research | Year: 2013

A review of the literature published in 2012 on topics relating to wastewater treatment innovations in the areas of modeling, instrumentation, automation and optimization of wastewater treatment is presented. © 2013 Water Environment Federation.


Sweeney M.W.,Toho Water Authority | Kabouris J.C.,Principal Wastewater Engineer
Water Environment Research | Year: 2015

A review of the literature published in 2014 on topics relating to water resource recovery facilities (WRRF) in the areas of modeling, instrumentation, automation and optimization of wastewater treatment is presented. Note that WEF has adopted 'WRRF' replacing such previous terms as publicly owned treatment works, wastewater treatment plant (WWTP), and other terms and officially instituted this change in its publications beginning in 2012. It is anticipated the replaced terms will remain in use by other publications and authors for some time. This review will strive to maintain consistency with this change but also avoid confusion where possible. © 2015 Water Environment Federation.


PubMed | Toho Water Authority
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Water environment research : a research publication of the Water Environment Federation | Year: 2016

A review of the literature published in 2015 on topics relating to water resource recovery facilities (WRRF) in the areas of modeling, automation, measurement and sensors and optimization of wastewater treatment (or water resource reclamation) is presented.


PubMed | Toho Water Authority
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Water environment research : a research publication of the Water Environment Federation | Year: 2015

A review of the literature published in 2014 on topics relating to water resource recovery facilities (WRRF) in the areas of modeling, instrumentation, automation and optimization of wastewater treatment is presented. Note that WEF has adopted WRRF replacing such previous terms as publicly owned treatment works, wastewater treatment plant (WWTP), and other terms and officially instituted this change in its publications beginning in 2012. It is anticipated the replaced terms will remain in use by other publications and authors for some time. This review will strive to maintain consistency with this change but also avoid confusion where possible.

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