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Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: MC-IAPP | Phase: FP7-PEOPLE-2013-IAPP | Award Amount: 3.02M | Year: 2013

Advances in digital pathology are generating huge volumes of whole slide and tissue microarray images which are providing new insights into the causes of some of todays most devastating diseases. They also present tremendous opportunities for developing and evaluating new and more effective treatments that may revolutionize the care of patients with cancers and other diseases. The challenge is to exploit the new and emerging digital pathology technologies effectively in order to process and model all the heterogeneous tissue-derived data. This requires joint research projects and collaborative programmes between academia and industry. Thus, biomedical scientists will be equipped with broad knowledge and tools of modern imaging and data processing as well as analysis technologies, whereas engineers with have an understanding of the complex disease processes and the clinical needs. This will help developing efficient and innovative products to fulfil the needs of digital pathology. The AIDPATH project addresses this challenge through a focused research, including research training aiming to knowledge sharing and career development in this emerging multidisciplinary field. AIDPATH will research and develop: a) state of the art medical image display technology for digital pathology, b) novel image analysis solutions and knowledge discovery tools for future pathology diagnosis and research and c) state of the art solutions for biomarker evaluation and quantification. The first application will be breast cancer, though the applicability of the implemented methods and tools to other major diseases will be analysed.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: MSCA-ITN-ETN | Phase: MSCA-ITN-2015-ETN | Award Amount: 3.66M | Year: 2016

The calcium sensing receptor (CaSR) is a class C Gprotein-coupled receptor that plays a pivotal role in systemic calcium metabolism by regulating parathyroid hormone secretion and urinary Ca excretion. Abnormal CaSR function is implicated in calciotropic disorders, and in non-calciotropic disorders such as Alzheimers disease (AD), cardiovascular disease (CVD), diabetes (DM), sarcopenia and cancer, which account for >25% of the global disease burden. The CaSR is a unique GPCR whose principal physiological ligand is the Ca2\ ion; it is expressed almost ubiquitously; interacts with multiple G subtypes regulating highly divergent downstream signalling pathways, depending on the cellular context. The CaSR Biomedicine is a fully translational project that utilises the concept of a single molecule, the CaSR, influencing a range of physiological and disease processes, to develop a unique, strong multidisciplinary and intersectoral scientific training programme preparing 14 young scientists to become specialists in GPCR biology and signalling. The objectives of CaSR Biomedicine are: 1. Educate and train Early Stage Researchers to become highly innovative scientists to enhance their career perspective. 2. Elucidate ligand- and tissue-dependent differences in CaSR physiology by examining its functions at cellular level and thus to contribute to the understanding of GPCR signalling in general; 3. Assess how CaSR function is altered in AD, CVD, DM, sarcopenia, and cancer, and to find innovative CaSR-based therapeutic approaches for these major, age-related disorders. 4. Establish long-lasting interdisciplinary and intersectoral cooperation among researchers and between researchers and industry, to strengthen the European Research Area. Therefore the CaSR Biomedicine will investigate the complexity of CaSR signalling and function to identify CaSR-based therapeutic approaches to diseases linked to changes in CaSR expression or function (AD, CVD, DM, sarcopenia, and cancer).

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