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Jundiaí, Brazil

Yashida M.H.,Tissue Morphology Laboratory | da Silva Faria A.L.D.,Tissue Morphology Laboratory | Jose Caldeira E.,Tissue Morphology Laboratory
Anatomical Record | Year: 2011

Diabetes mellitus results in various complications, also compromising the salivary glands. Hormone levels and interactions with cellular receptors are altered, intensifying the damage caused by this disease. Hormone replacement therapy alone or combined with other treatments may reverse this damage, but doubts still exist regarding the efficacy of this procedure. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of estrogen replacement therapy combined with insulin treatment on salivary secretory cells and on the expression of insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-I receptors in salivary glands of spontaneously diabetic (NOD) mice. Twenty-five mice were divided into five groups of five animals each: group I (NOD diabetic), group II (NOD diabetic treated with insulin), group III (NOD diabetic treated with estrogen), group IV (NOD diabetic treated with insulin and estrogen), and group V (control Balb/c mice). Group II received insulin, group III received estrogen, and group IV received insulin plus estrogen administered daily for 20 days. Groups I and V received saline for the same period of time to simulate treatment. Glucose and estrogen levels were monitored during treatment, and salivary gland samples were collected at the end of treatment for stereological analysis and immunofluorescence detection of IGF-I receptors. Tissue restructuring and regulation of IGF-I receptors expression were observed in animals submitted to estrogen replacement therapy plus insulin. Estrogen effectively promoted the recovery of salivary secretory cells, demonstrating that this hormone alone, and especially when combined with insulin, might be important for the reversal of hyperglycemia-induced tissue injury. © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc. Source


Da Silva Faria A.L.D.,Tissue Morphology Laboratory | Dias M.A.,Tissue Morphology Laboratory | Leme V.B.,Tissue Morphology Laboratory | Mayoral E.E.,Tissue Morphology Laboratory | And 4 more authors.
Archives of Oral Biology | Year: 2013

Objectives: The incretin-based therapy might be effective in patients possessing certain levels of preserved pancreatic beta-cells. However, doubts still exist regarding the efficacy of this atment in the recovery of tissues damaged by type 1 diabetes. Thus, the objective of this study was to evaluate the treatment with MK0431 in salivary glands of spontaneously diabetic mice, focusing mainly on the possible therapeutic and hypoglycaemic effects of this dipeptidyl peptidase IV inhibitor in the recovery of these salivary tissues. Methods and results: Twenty mice were divided into two groups of 10 animals each: group I (NOD diabetic/untreated) and group II (NOD diabetic MK0431/treated). The group II was treated during 4 weeks with MK0431 mixed in the food. The group I was maintained in the same way without receiving, however, any treatment. Glucose levels were monitored during treatment and salivary glands samples were collected at the end of treatment for the histological examination under both transmitted and polarized light microscopy. High glucose levels were observed in untreated animals, while in animals with treatment, reduction of these levels was observed. Tissue restructuring was also observed in animals submitted to therapy with MK0431, mainly in relation to the attempt to extracellular matrix reorganization. Conclusions: According to results, the treatment with this dipeptidyl peptidase IV inhibitor contributed to the general homeostasis of the organism and to the reestablishment of both epithelial and stromal compartments which were damaged by the hyperglycaemic condition, demonstrating that the incretin-based therapy may be an important complementary treatment for the type 1 diabetic condition. © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. Source


Ferragut J.M.,Tissue Morphology Laboratory | Da Cunha M.R.,Tissue Morphology Laboratory | Carvalho C.A.F.,Tissue Morphology Laboratory | Isayama R.N.,Tissue Morphology Laboratory | Caldeira E.J.,Tissue Morphology Laboratory
Archives of Oral Biology | Year: 2011

Objectives: Cigarette smoke leads to precancerous and cancerous lesions in the mouth even when the exposure is passive. The salivary glands are amongst the tissues exposed to the smoke but it is unclear whether or not passive cigarette exposure is related to detectable changes in these tissues. The objective of this study was to observe the tissue architecture of the parotid and submandibular glands in rats after passive cigarette exposure and to measure any changes that occurred. Design: Twenty Wistar rats were divided into 10 non-smoking animals and 10 animals exposed to cigarette smoke. After 6 months of smoke exposure samples were collected from both exposed and unexposed salivary glands for histological examination under both transmitted and polarized light microscopy. Results: Changes in the glands of exposed animals included involution of the cytoplasm and nucleus of the acinar cells and the presence of an inflammatory infiltrate. There was an abnormal accumulation of type I collagen in the stroma and an enlarged interacinar space filled with extracellular matrix. Conclusion: Passive smoking led to substantial structural changes in the salivary glands which could significantly affect function. © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. Source


Metidieri H.T.,Tissue Morphology Laboratory | Mancio R.D.,Tissue Morphology Laboratory | Mayoral E.E.,Tissue Morphology Laboratory | Rojas F.A.,Tissue Morphology Laboratory | And 4 more authors.
Microscopy Research and Technique | Year: 2012

Background: Diabetes mellitus results in many complications, also compromising the salivary glands. The current treatment for this condition should be a substituting method to exogenous insulin. In this aspect, the immunotherapy has been tested, but, it can be inefficient as an agent for the control of damage caused by diabetes. Thus, the aim of this study was to evaluate the anti-CD3 monoclonal antibody as alternative immunotherapy in the recovery of salivary glands of spontaneously diabetic NOD (nonobese diabetic) mice. Methods: NOD mice were divided into two groups of 10 animals: group I (untreated diabetic mice) and group II (anti-CD3-treated diabetic mice). After treatment, the samples of salivary glands were collected for histological examination under both transmitted and polarized light microscopy. Results: Alterations in tissue architecture; increase in extracellular matrix and presence of inflammatory process were observed in untreated animals. Recovery of the salivary acinar cells occurred in treated animals. The parotid glands demonstrated a smaller amount of collagen fibers and were not observed severe inflammatory processes. Conclusion: These results indicate that immunotherapy contributed to reestablishment of tissue damaged by the hyperglycemic condition, demonstrating that the immunomodulation plays an important role in the recovery of salivary glands. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Source

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