Tiger Watch

Sawāi Mādhopur, India

Tiger Watch

Sawāi Mādhopur, India
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Everard M.,University of the West of England | Khandal D.,Tiger Watch | Sahu Y.K.,Ranthambhore Tiger Reserve
Ecosystem Services | Year: 2017

Conflict between people and ecosystem capacity is a global problem, and achievement of wildlife-human co-existence a strategic global need. Apex predators suffer disproportionately, including conflicts with human activities. Recovery of formerly declining predator populations, particularly India's Bengal tiger (Panthera tigris tigris), increases potential human conflict. Habitat conversion for arable production and proliferation of non-native tree species increases likelihood of conflict between wildlife, people and stock in villages in the Amlidha buffer zone between core areas of the Ranthambhore Tiger Reserve. Arresting and reversing landscape conversion in targeted zones can reduce potential wildlife-human conflict by regenerating ecosystem capacity, enabling coexistence of a ‘green corridor’ for terrestrial wildlife migration, a ‘blue corridor’ for movement of riverine wildlife, and sustainable human livelihoods. This can be achieved through informed and consensual community-based zoning of land uses, management of non-native species and regeneration of local water resources. Conversely, continuing habitat simplification will decrease ecosystem vitality and services, increasing wildlife-human conflict and insecurities. Transition to multifunctional ecosystem management doesn't require wholesale change; elective, consensual adjustments can enhance socio-ecological security. Initiatives by the NGO Tiger Watch involving village people, whose willing engagement is essential for sustainable management, support potential achievement of simultaneous wildlife conservation and human benefits. © 2017 Elsevier B.V.


Katdare S.,Tiger Watch | Srivathsa A.,Tiger Watch | Joshi A.,Tiger Watch | Panke P.,Tiger Watch | And 3 more authors.
Aquatic Conservation: Marine and Freshwater Ecosystems | Year: 2011

The gharial, Gavialis gangeticus (Gmelin 1789), a piscivorous reptile of Asian river systems, is increasingly threatened by diverse human pressures. Three survey expeditions were launched to monitor gharial populations, notable wildlife, and the activities and attitudes of local people in a 110km stretch of the Chambal River in the National Chambal Reserve (NCS), India. Only 15% of gharial observed in December 2009 were in the upstream 54% of the surveyed river length. This coincides with the highest density of disturbance including water pumps, fishermen, and the highest growth in fishing activity since December 2008. Although fishing is recognized as a significant threat to gharial, no strong relationship was found between numbers of gharial and fishermen. However, numbers of water pumps, indicative of the intensity of agricultural activity, had a negative relationship with gharial numbers. This relationship was strengthened by omitting the upstream (Pali to Rameshwaram) survey reach, the tourist area of the NCS, which is also potentially affected by upstream reaches. The downstream 46% of surveyed river length in December 2009 supported 85% of gharial (consistent with trends in other surveys), including 91.6% of males and 81.8% of juveniles. This reach is classified as a High Population Recorded Area of high potential conservation importance, also containing better habitat quality and lower human disturbance. A positive relationship was found between gharial numbers and sand habitat features. However, the Davar to Ghoonsai survey reach had low gharial numbers despite abundant sand features, perhaps due to a substantial length of the Ghoonsai sand bank having been converted or agriculture. This may have significant implications for gharial conservation. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. 21 4 June 2011 10.1002/aqc.1195 Research Article Research Articles Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd..

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