Lexington, MA, United States
Lexington, MA, United States
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A particle comprising a plurality of lithium nickel oxide crystallites having a layered alpha-NaFe02-type structure and a grain boundary between adjacent crystallites, wherein the grain boundary comprises a second composition comprising a Co-substituted lithium nickel oxide having a layered alpha-NaFe02-type structure, a cubic structure or a combination thereof, and wherein the concentration of cobalt in the grain boundaries is greater than a concentration of cobalt in the crystallites.


Grant
Agency: Department of Defense | Branch: Army | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase II | Award Amount: 500.00K | Year: 2015

TIAX will build, characterize and abuse test high energy 18650-size lithium-ion cells employing Fe-substituted LiCoPO4 high voltage cathode material developed by the Army Research Laboratory and compare their performance to control LiCoO2-based lithium-ion cells. TIAX will perform overcharge, external short circuit, uniform heating and crush tests to the specification of the UL1642 standard and will also perform nail penetration and stimulated internal short circuit tests on both types of cells. This Phase II program will also focus on implementing cell chemistry and design improvements to enhance performance, safety and energy density.


Grant
Agency: Department of Defense | Branch: Navy | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase II | Award Amount: 999.84K | Year: 2016

TIAX LLC is proposing to demonstrate technology for early detection of incipient internal short circuits in lithium-ion cells for three battery systems of interest to the Navy. In the Phase II Program, we will demonstrate function of two distinct short circuit detection technologies in relevant subscale battery packs, characterize design trade-offs between these technologies as a function of different types of battery pack, and demonstrate readiness for implementation in Navy systems. In the Phase II Option, and in consultation with the Navy, one of the battery systems will be selected and modified with internal short circuit detection technology designed in Phase II. The standalone battery, equipped with embedded prototype internal short circuit detection technology, will be delivered to the Navy.


Grant
Agency: Department of Energy | Branch: | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase I | Award Amount: 149.94K | Year: 2015

Start-stop batteries offer the promise of significant improvements in vehicle fuel economy, without significant increase in vehicle sales price. A key enabling component of the start-stop system is the battery. Present start-stop systems employ lead acid batteries because of their low initial cost and excellent low-temperature performance, but these batteries suffer from life limitations especially when subjected to repeated deep cycling and high charge rates. Li-ion technology is the leading candidate to replace lead-acid batteries in start-stop systems. However, most Li-ion battery systems offered today suffer from one or more disadvantages such as poor low-temperature performance, poor high-rate charge acceptance, or high cost relative to lead acid batteries. TIAX proposes to develop Li-ion technology for start-stop applications that overcomes the limitations of the current Li-ion systems by combining its proprietary high-power cathode materials with lithium titanate LTO) anode and specially engineered electrolyte. In Phase I we will demonstrate the potential for this system to be competitive over lead acid batteries and state-of-the-art Li-ion systems for start-stop applications using cells with capacities > 200 mAh. In Phase II, the battery technology will be further optimized and performance relative to USABC targets demonstrated in a 12 V module. Widespread deployment of start-stop technology in vehicles, that can be enabled by TIAXs technology, can enhance the fuel economy of light-duty vehicles by as much as 5% without a significant increase in vehicle cost. This can allow the automobile manufacturers to meet increasingly stringent goals for fuel economy. Because start-stop batteries reduce engine idling, emissions of CO2 and pollutants such as hydrocarbons, CO, NOx and particulates can be significantly reduced in urban areas.


Grant
Agency: Department of Homeland Security | Branch: | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase II | Award Amount: 749.98K | Year: 2014

In the Phase I program, TIAX LLC developed a detection methodology that was able to measure significant differences between pairs of counterfeit and authentic products in four different product categories. Establishing the proof-of-concept of this technique creates the potential for a new detection methodology that can be utilized at a port of entry by U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) to identify shipments of counterfeit goods. The objective of the Phase II program is to further develop and optimize the detection methodology developed in the Phase I program. In the Phase II program, we will develop a prototype detection system and demonstrate it under field conditions in a U.S. port of entry. When fully developed, the methodology will allow for the rapid and accurate screening of closed containers for counterfeit products. It will be designed to work outdoors in a port environment in extreme weather conditions. The TIAX methodology will use instruments that are rugged, mobile and can be operated by personnel with minimal scientific training.


A particle, including: a plurality of crystallites including a first composition having a layered -NaFeO_(2)-type structure and including lithium in an amount of about 0.1 to about 1.3 moles, per mole of the first composition, nickel in an amount of about 0.1 to about 0.79 mole, per mole of the first composition, cobalt in an amount of 0 to about 0.5 mole, per mole of the first composition, and oxygen in an amount of about 1.7 to about 2.3 moles, per mole of the first composition; and a grain boundary between adjacent crystallites of the plurality of crystallites and including a second composition having the layered -NaFeO_(2)-type structure, a cubic structure, or a combination thereof, wherein a concentration of cobalt in the grain boundary is greater than a concentration of cobalt in the crystallites.


Grant
Agency: National Aeronautics and Space Administration | Branch: | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase I | Award Amount: 118.48K | Year: 2015

TIAX proposes to develop lightweight, smart composite materials capable of sensing their own mechanical and thermal state. These composites will add functionality to structural materials used both in NASA missions and high-performance commercial applications. We will build on literature methods to sense strain, damage initiation and propagation, and temperature in composite materials to prepare, in a manner consistent with production-scale manufacturing and integration into real-world systems, multifunctional composites capable of reporting on their own health. These composites will be tested to ensure that their mechanical properties meet or exceed those of the base composite and to demonstrate that the embedded sensing capability accurately reports on composite health.


Grant
Agency: Department of Homeland Security | Branch: | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase II | Award Amount: 749.80K | Year: 2016

TIAX will develop a set of fingerprint treatments (including either chemical or instrumental methods, or a combination of both) that allows accurate collection of latent print images from any of the three main classes of surface (porous, nonporous, and adhesive) without compromising subsequent profiling of DNA that may be present in the print. Treatments identified will be developed into prototype products, validated, and applied to real case work in collaboration with DHS-CBP. Our methodology includes use of a statistically rigorous dose-response method to support claims of non-interference with DNA profiling, as well as an experiment-based rational design process to identify suitable or optimal product formulations and instrument configurations. Independent validation of products and methods will be accomplished through partnership with a DHS laboratory.


Grant
Agency: Department of Energy | Branch: | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase II | Award Amount: 999.85K | Year: 2016

For use in congested traffic, start stop vehicle technology (microhybrid) offers the promise of significant increases in fuel economy and reduction of pollutant emissions, without large increase in the vehicle sales price. A key enabling component of the start stop system is the battery. Present start stop systems employ lead acid batteries because of their low initial cost and excellent low temperature performance, but these batteries suffer from life limitations especially when subjected to repeated deep cycling and high charge rates. Consequently, alternate battery systems with improved life characteristics are the key to enable widespread adoption of start stop vehicles. Liion technology is the leading candidate to replace lead acid batteries in start stop systems and several battery companies have announced Liion batteries for start stop applications. However, most Liion battery systems offered today suffer from one or more disadvantages such as poor low temperature performance, poor high rate charge acceptance, or high cost relative to lead acid batteries. This is at least in part because the materials in these batteries are not optimized for the specific requirements of start stop applications. TIAX is developing Liion technology for start stop applications that overcomes the limitations of the current Liion systems by tailoring its proprietary CAM7 cathode material for use opposite lithium titanate anode (LTO) anode in pouch cells that provide excellent cold cranking capability, elevated temperature stability, cycle life and safety for 12V start stop batteries. In Phase I, TIAX showed that CAM7 cathode/LTO anode pouch cell technology provides excellent 30 °C cold cranking capability and elevated temperature stability (without pouch cell gassing/swelling), that the performance could be improved by CAM7 material modifications that specifically targeted the start/stop implementation, and that CAM7 cells had superior performance to competing cathodes. In Phase II we will optimize the CAM7 material and the cathode and anode electrode designs for the 12V start stop battery application. We will develop a cell design for 12V start stop batteries based on automobile company input and our internal results. We will assemble scaled versions of these cells into 12V modules that achieve USABC 12V start stop vehicle battery stability and scaled power and energy targets, and we will demonstrate the excellent abuse tolerance of these cells under standard thermal, electrical and mechanical abuse tests. The TIAX start stop battery technology will facilitate widespread commercialization of start stop microHEVs by enhancing the available energy, dynamic charge acceptance, and life of Liion batteries used in microHEVs. Rapid, widespread adoption of affordable microHEVs in traffic congested areas of the country can yield benefits including reduced adverse health impacts from pollution in urban and other high traffic areas, reduced adverse environmental and economic impacts of global warming, and reduced economic impacts of fluctuations in global petroleum supply and price. Key Words Start stop vehicle battery, microhybrid vehicle battery, lithiumion. TIAX is developing low cost microhybrid vehicle battery technology that will facilitate widespread commercialization of start stop vehicles by presenting a compelling value proposition for drivers in congested traffic areas. This will reduce the fuel consumption and pollutant emission associated with idling in traffic, yielding public health, environmental quality, and economic benefits.


Grant
Agency: Department of Defense | Branch: Defense Health Program | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase II | Award Amount: 999.59K | Year: 2015

A lightweight, portable, robust system is proposed to detect and classify mild traumatic brain injuries rapidly in forward areas, based on on neuroscience and neurology-based algorithms and wearable computers of the newest generation.

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