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Heping, China

Xing D.,Tianjin Medical University | Ma J.-X.,Tianjin Medical University | Ma X.-L.,Tianjin Medical University | Song D.-H.,Tianjin Gongan Hospital | And 2 more authors.
European Spine Journal | Year: 2013

Objective: To identify the independent risk factors, based on available evidence in the literature, for patients developing surgical site infections (SSI) after spinal surgery. Methods: Non-interventional studies evaluating the independent risk factors for patients developing SSI following spinal surgery were searched in Medline, Embase, Sciencedirect and OVID. The quality of the included studies was assessed by a modified quality assessment tool that had been previously designed for observational studies. The effects of studies were combined with the study quality score using a best-evidence synthesis model. Results Thirty-six observational studies involving 2,439 patients with SSI after spinal surgery were identified. The included studies covered a wide range of indications and surgical procedures. These articles were published between 1998 and 2012. According to the quality assessment criteria for included studies, 15 studies were deemed to be high-quality studies, 5 were moderate-quality studies, and 16 were low-quality studies. A total of 46 independent factors were evaluated for risk of SSI. There was strong evidence for six factors, including obesity/BMI, longer operation times, diabetes, smoking, history of previous SSI and type of surgical procedure. We also identified 8 moderate-evidence, 31 limited-evidence and 1 conflictingevidence factors. Conclusion: Although there is no conclusive evidence for why postoperative SSI occurs, these data provide evidence to guide clinicians in admitting patients who will have spinal operations and to choose an optimal prophylactic strategy. Further research is still required to evaluate the effects of these above risk factors. © Springer-Verlag 2012. Source


Ma J.,Tianjin University | Ma J.,Tianjin Medical University | Xing D.,Tianjin Medical University | Ma X.,Tianjin Medical University | And 2 more authors.
Orthopaedics and Traumatology: Surgery and Research | Year: 2012

Background: The use of a percutaneous compression plate (PCCP) provides a minimally invasive technique for the fixation of stable intertrochanteric femoral fractures. It has several theoretically potential advantages over the dynamic hip screw (DHS) such as shorten incision and lower incidence of wound infection. Hypothesis: PCCP have several advantages than DHS, such as reduced blood loss, transfusion, mortality, shorter operative time, and lower incidence of complications. This systematic review and meta-analysis was performed to identify the clinical outcomes and safety of patients with stable intertrochanteric hip fractures operated on using PCCP compared with DHS. Materials and methods: A systematic search of all studies published through April 2012 was conducted using the Medline, Embase, Sciencedirect, OVID and the Cochrane Central database. The randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and quasi-randomised control trials (qRCTs) that compared PCCP with DHS in treating adult patients with stable intertrochanteric hip fractures and provided data on safety and clinical effects were identified. Demographic characteristics, adverse events and clinical outcomes were manually extracted from all of the selected studies. Results: Nine studies encompassing 914 patients met the inclusion criteria. Overall, the result of meta-analysis indicated that over DHS, PCCP allowed significantly shorter operative time, reduced blood loss as well as transfusion, diminished incidence of cardiovascular events. However, there were no significant differences in length of hospitalization, rate of walking without help, early mortality and other complications. Discussion: Significant differences favoring PCCP were found with regard to operative time, blood loss, transfusion and lower incidence of cardiovascular events. However, owing to the limitations of this systematic review, future RCTs are still needed to confirm this data and the clinical efficiency of PCCP. Level of evidence: Level II: low-powered prospective randomized trial. © 2012. Source


Xing D.,Tianjin Medical University | Ma J.-X.,Tianjin Medical University | Ma X.-L.,Tianjin Medical University | Wang J.,Tianjin Medical University | Song D.-H.,Tianjin Gongan Hospital
Journal of Clinical Neuroscience | Year: 2013

A meta-analysis was conducted to assess the safety and efficacy of balloon kyphoplasty (KP) compared to percutaneous vertebroplasty (VP) in the treatment of osteoporotic vertebral compression fractures (OVCF). Ten studies, encompassing 783 patients, met the inclusion criteria. Overall, the results of the meta-analysis indicated that there were significant differences between the two groups in the long-term kyphosis angle (mean difference [MD] = -2.64,95% confidence interval [CI] = -4.66 to -0.61; p = 0.01), the anterior height of the vertebral body (MD = 3.67, 95% CI = 1.40 to 5.94; p = 0.002), and the cement leakage rates (risk ratio [RR] = 0.70, 95% CI = 0.52 to 0.95; p = 0.02). However, there were no significant differences in the short-term visual analog scale (VAS) scores (MD = -0.57, 95% CI -1.33 to 0.20; p = 0.15), the longterm VAS scores (MD = -0.99, 95% CI = -2.29 to 0.31; p = 0.14), the short-term Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) scores (MD = -6.54, 95% CI = -14.57 to 1.48; p = 0.11), the long-term ODI scores (MD = -2.01, 95% CI = -11.75 to 7.73; p = 0.69), the operation time (MD = 4.47, 95% CI = -0.22 to 9.17; p = 0.06), the short-term kyphosis angle (MD = -2.25, 95% CI = -5.14 to 0.65; p = 0.13), or the adjacent-level fracture rates (RR = 1.52, 95% CI = 0.76 to 3.03; p = 0.24). This meta-analysis demonstrates that KP and VP are both safe and effective surgical procedures for treating OVCF. Compared with VP, KP can significantly relieve a long-term kyphosis angle, improve the height of the vertebral body, and reduce the incidence of bone cement leakage. However, because of the limitations of this meta-analysis, a large randomized controlled trial is required to confirm our findings. © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. Source


Gu E.,Tianjin University of Traditional Chinese Medicine | Lu J.,Tianjin Gongan Hospital | Xing D.,Tianjin Gongan Hospital | Chen X.,Tianjin University of Traditional Chinese Medicine | And 3 more authors.
International Journal of Rheumatic Diseases | Year: 2015

Objectives: The objective of the present meta-analysis was to investigate whether the combined evidence shows an association between the STAT4 rs7574865 polymorphism and RA. Methods: A systematic search of all relevant studies published through April 2013 was conducted using MEDLINE, EMBASE, OVID, and ScienceDirect. The observational studies that were related to an association between the STAT4 rs7574865 polymorphism and RA were identified. The association between the STAT4 rs7574865 polymorphism and RA susceptibility was assessed using genetic models. Results: Seventeen case-control studies with a total of 28 comparisons (25 300 RA patients and 26 326 controls) met the inclusion criteria. A meta-analysis was conducted for genotype TT versus GT+GG, GT+TT versus GG, TT versus GG and T-allele. The meta-analysis showed an association between RA and the STAT4 rs7574865 TT genotype, GT+TT genotype and T-allele in all subjects. Stratification of RA patients according to ethnic group showed that the TT genotype, GT+TT genotype and T-allele were significantly associated with RA in Europeans, Asians, Africans and Latin Americans. A subgroup analysis according to the absence or presence of rheumatoid factor (RF) and anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide (anti-CCP) antibodies revealed that the association between the STAT4 rs7574865 polymorphism and RA may be independent of the presence of RF and anti-CCP antibodies. Conclusions: This meta-analysis demonstrated that the STAT4 rs7574865 polymorphism confers susceptibility to RA in major ethnic groups. The association may not be dependent on the presence of RF and anti-CCP antibodies © 2014 Asia Pacific League of Associations for Rheumatology and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd. Source


Xing D.,Tianjin Medical University | Ma J.-X.,Tianjin Medical University | Song D.-H.,Tianjin Gongan Hospital | Wang J.,Tianjin Medical University | And 3 more authors.
European Spine Journal | Year: 2013

Objective: The optimal timing of stabilization in patients with traumatic thoracolumbar fractures remains controversial. There is currently a lack of consensus on the timing of surgical stabilization, which is limited by the reality that a randomized controlled trial to evaluate early versus late stabilization is difficult to perform. Therefore, the objective of this study was to determine the benefits, safety and costs of early stabilization compared with late stabilization using data available in the current literature. Methods: An electronic literature search was performed in Medline, Embase, Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, and Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials for relevant studies evaluating the timing of surgery in patients with thoracolumbar fractures. Two reviewers independently analyzed and selected each study on the basis of the eligibility criteria. The quality of the included studies was assessed using the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development, and Evaluation system (GRADE). Any disagreements were resolved by consensus. Results: Ten studies involving 2,512 subjects were identified. These studies demonstrated that early stabilization shortened the hospital length of stay, intensive care unit length of stay, ventilator days and reduced morbidity and hospital expenses for patients with thoracic fractures. However, reduced morbidity and hospital expenses were not observed with stabilization of lumbar fractures. Owing to the very low level of evidence, no conclusion could be made regarding the effect of early stabilization on mortality. Conclusions: We could adhere to the recommendation that patients with traumatic thoracolumbar fractures should undergo early stabilization, which may reduce the hospital length of stay, intensive care unit length of stay, ventilator days, morbidity and hospital expenses, particularly when the thoracic spine is involved. Individual patient characteristics should be concerned carefully. However, the definite conclusion cannot be made due to the heterogeneity of the included studies and low level of evidence. Further prospective studies are required to confirm whether there are benefits to early stabilization compared with late stabilization. © 2012 Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg. Source

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