THOR Photomedicine Ltd

United Kingdom

THOR Photomedicine Ltd

United Kingdom
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Jenkins P.A.,SpectraMedics Pty Ltd. | Jenkins P.A.,SpectraVET Inc. | Jenkins P.A.,ImmunoPhotonics Inc. | Carroll J.D.,THOR Photomedicine Ltd.
Photomedicine and Laser Surgery | Year: 2011

Background: Dose and beam parameters are critical for successful laser, LED, and other light therapy treatments; however, in our experience, researchers frequently make critical errors and omissions when submitting papers for publication. Journals frequently publish studies with missing data, mathematical errors, and no reported verification of beam parameters. This makes reproducibility impossible, and further confounds an already complex subject. Objective: This article is intended to be a reference document for non-physicist researchers conducting low-level laser therapy (LLLT) laboratory studies and clinical trials to help them design and report the beam and dose aspects of their trials. Recommendations: It provides a checklist to help LLLT researchers understand and report all the necessary parameters for a repeatable scientific study. It includes the eight most important beam parameters to report, which are: wavelength, power, irradiation time, beam area at the skin or culture surface (this is not necessarily the same as the aperture size), pulse parameters, anatomical location, number of treatments, and interval between treatments. The three commonly used dose parameters are time, energy, and energy density. In addition, more thorough reporting would include coherence, application technique (contact, projection, scanning, pressure), beam profile, and spectral width, as these may also be considered important. Beam power often decreases as the device warms up and as the device ages; therefore, this should be checked routinely during an experiment/trial. Measurements of beam area and beam power require special instruments and trained technicians to operate them. Power measurements should be taken before, after, and at frequent intervals during research trials. Conclusion: Reviewers should insist that the minimum eight most important beam parameters are included, and authors should take care to measure and record these accurately before, during, and after an experiment or clinical trial. © Copyright 2011, Mary Ann Liebert, Inc.


Hashmi J.T.,Massachusetts General Hospital | Huang Y.-Y.,Massachusetts General Hospital | Huang Y.-Y.,Harvard University | Huang Y.-Y.,Guangxi Medical University | And 8 more authors.
Lasers in Surgery and Medicine | Year: 2010

Background and Objective: Low level light (or laser) therapy (LLLT) is a rapidly growing modality used in physical therapy, chiropractic, sports medicine and increasingly in mainstream medicine. LLLT is used to increase wound healing and tissue regeneration, to relieve pain and inflammation, to prevent tissue death, to mitigate degeneration in many neurological indications. While some agreement has emerged on the best wavelengths of light and a range of acceptable dosages to be used (irradiance and fluence), there is no agreement on whether continuous wave or pulsed light is best and on what factors govern the pulse parameters to be chosen. Study Design/Materials and Methods: The published peer-reviewed literature was reviewed between 1970 and 2010. Results: The basic molecular and cellular mechanisms of LLLT are discussed. The type of pulsed light sources available and the parameters that govern their pulse structure are outlined. Studies that have compared continuous wave and pulsed light in both animals and patients are reviewed. Frequencies used in other pulsed modalities used in physical therapy and biomedicine are compared to those used in LLLT. Conclusion: There is some evidence that pulsed light does have effects that are different from those of continuous wave light. However further work is needed to define these effects for different disease conditions and pulse structures. © 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.


News Article | November 23, 2016
Site: www.newsmaker.com.au

According to Stratistics MRC, the Global Photomedicine Market is accounted for $313.23 million in 2015 and is expected to reach $426.89 million by 2022 growing at a CAGR of 4.5% during the forecast period. Growing geriatric population and rising awareness for beauty are some of the factors boosting the market growth. However, huge costs and product safety concerns are anticipated to hamper the market growth. By application, Oncology segment is anticipated to witness significant growth during the forecast period owing to rising prevalence of cancer worldwide. By region, North America commanded the largest share in the global market due to increased desire to retain youth and beauty among population. However, emerging markets such as Brazil, India, Germany, Saudi Arabia and China are anticipated to grow at the highest CAGR due to demand for new therapies for body contouring and other medical conditions. Some of the key players in Photomedicine market include Abbott Medical Optics Inc., Novartis, Philips, BIOLITEC, THOR Photomedicine Ltd, Quantel medical, Alma Lasers, Ltd., IRIDEX, QBMI PhotoMedicine, Switch Biotech, Syneron Medical Ltd., AngioDynamics, Wellman Center for Photomedicine, Spectranetics, Lumenis Ltd., Pfizer Inc., Colorado Skin & Vein and PhotoMedex. Technologies Covered: • Dichroic Lamps       • Lasers • Full Spectrum Light • Light-Emitting Diodes • Polychromatic Polarized Light • Fluorescent Lamps Applications Covered: • Pain Management • Dental Procedures • Dermatology o Skin Resurfacing o Hair Removal o Tattoo Removal • Optical Diagnostics • Wound Healing • Oncology • Other Applications Regions Covered: • North America o US o Canada o Mexico • Europe o Germany o France o Italy o UK  o Spain o Rest of Europe       • Asia Pacific o Japan        o China        o India        o Australia        o New Zealand       o Rest of Asia Pacific • Rest of the World o Middle East o Brazil       o Argentina        o South Africa o Egypt What our report offers: - Market share assessments for the regional and country level segments - Market share analysis of the top industry players - Strategic recommendations for the new entrants - Market forecasts for a minimum of 7 years of all the mentioned segments, sub segments and the regional markets - Market Trends (Drivers, Constraints, Opportunities, Threats, Challenges, Investment Opportunities, and recommendations) - Strategic recommendations in key business segments based on the market estimations - Competitive landscaping mapping the key common trends - Company profiling with detailed strategies, financials, and recent developments - Supply chain trends mapping the latest technological advancements


— Growing geriatric population and rising awareness for beauty are some of the factors boosting the market growth. However, huge costs and product safety concerns are anticipated to hamper the market growth. By application, Oncology segment is anticipated to witness significant growth during the forecast period owing to rising prevalence of cancer worldwide. By region, North America commanded the largest share in the global market due to increased desire to retain youth and beauty among population. However, emerging markets such as Brazil, India, Germany, Saudi Arabia and China are anticipated to grow at the highest CAGR due to demand for new therapies for body contouring and other medical conditions. Some of the key players in Photomedicine market include Abbott Medical Optics Inc., Novartis, Philips, BIOLITEC, THOR Photomedicine Ltd, Quantel medical, Alma Lasers, Ltd., IRIDEX, QBMI PhotoMedicine, Switch Biotech, Syneron Medical Ltd., AngioDynamics, Wellman Center for Photomedicine, Spectranetics, Lumenis Ltd., Pfizer Inc., Colorado Skin & Vein and PhotoMedex. Regions Covered: • North America o US o Canada o Mexico • Europe o Germany o France o Italy o UK o Spain o Rest of Europe • Asia Pacific o Japan o China o India o Australia o New Zealand o Rest of Asia Pacific • Rest of the World o Middle East o Brazil o Argentina o South Africa o Egypt What our report offers: - Market share assessments for the regional and country level segments - Market share analysis of the top industry players - Strategic recommendations for the new entrants - Market forecasts for a minimum of 7 years of all the mentioned segments, sub segments and the regional markets - Market Trends (Drivers, Constraints, Opportunities, Threats, Challenges, Investment Opportunities, and recommendations) - Strategic recommendations in key business segments based on the market estimations - Competitive landscaping mapping the key common trends - Company profiling with detailed strategies, financials, and recent developments - Supply chain trends mapping the latest technological advancements About Stratistics MRC We offer wide spectrum of research and consulting services with in-depth knowledge of different industries. We are known for customized research services, consulting services and Full Time Equivalent (FTE) services in the research world. We explore the market trends and draw our insights with valid assessments and analytical views. We use advanced techniques and tools among the quantitative and qualitative methodologies to identify the market trends. Our research reports and publications are routed to help our clients to design their business models and enhance their business growth in the competitive market scenario. We have a strong team with hand-picked consultants including project managers, implementers, industry experts, researchers, research evaluators and analysts with years of experience in delivering the complex projects. For more information, please visit http://www.strategymrc.com/


Carroll J.D.,THOR Photomedicine Ltd. | Milward M.R.,Oral Biology | Cooper P.R.,Oral Biology | Hadis M.,University of Birmingham | Palin W.M.,University of Birmingham
Dental Materials | Year: 2014

Objectives Low level light/laser therapy (LLLT) is the direct application of light to stimulate cell responses (photobiomodulation) in order to promote tissue healing, reduce inflammation and induce analgesia. There have been significant studies demonstrating its application and efficacy at many sites within the body and for treatment of a range of musculoskeletal injuries, degenerative diseases and dysfunction, however, its use on oral tissues has, to date, been limited. The purpose of this review is to consider the potential for LLLT in dental and oral applications by providing background information on its mechanism of action and delivery parameters and by drawing parallels with its treatment use in analogous cells and tissues from other sites of the body. Methods A literature search on Medline was performed on laser and light treatments in a range of dental/orofacial applications from 2010 to March 2013. The search results were filtered for LLLT relevance. The clinical papers were then arranged to eight broad dental/orofacial categories and reviewed. Results The initial search returned 2778 results, when filtered this was reduced to 153. 41 were review papers or editorials, 65 clinical and 47 laboratory studies. Of all the publications, 130 reported a positive effect in terms of pain relief, fast healing or other improvement in symptoms or appearance and 23 reported inconclusive or negative outcomes. Direct application of light as a therapeutic intervention within the oral cavity (rather than photodynamic therapies, which utilize photosensitizing solutions) has thus far received minimal attention. Data from the limited studies that have been performed which relate to the oral cavity indicate that LLLT may be a reliable, safe and novel approach to treating a range of oral and dental disorders and in particular for those which there is an unmet clinical need. Significance The potential benefits of LLLT that have been demonstrated in many healthcare fields and include improved healing, reduced inflammation and pain control, which suggest considerable potential for its use in oral tissues. © 2014 Academy of Dental Materials.


Chung H.,Massachusetts General Hospital | Chung H.,Harvard University | Dai T.,Massachusetts General Hospital | Dai T.,Harvard University | And 8 more authors.
Annals of Biomedical Engineering | Year: 2012

Soon after the discovery of lasers in the 1960s it was realized that laser therapy had the potential to improve wound healing and reduce pain, inflammation and swelling. In recent years the field sometimes known as photobiomodulation has broadened to include light-emitting diodes and other light sources, and the range of wavelengths used now includes many in the red and near infrared. The term "low level laser therapy" or LLLT has become widely recognized and implies the existence of the biphasic dose response or the Arndt-Schulz curve. This review will cover the mechanisms of action of LLLT at a cellular and at a tissular level and will summarize the various light sources and principles of dosimetry that are employed in clinical practice. The range of diseases, injuries, and conditions that can be benefited by LLLT will be summarized with an emphasis on those that have reported randomized controlled clinical trials. Serious life-threatening diseases such as stroke, heart attack, spinal cord injury, and traumatic brain injury may soon be amenable to LLLT therapy. © 2011 Biomedical Engineering Society.


Hamblin M.R.,Harvard-MIT Division of Health Sciences and Technology | Huang Y.-Y.,Harvard University | Huang Y.-Y.,Guangxi Medical University | Sharma S.K.,Massachusetts General Hospital | Carroll J.,THOR Photomedicine Ltd
Dose-Response | Year: 2011

Low-level laser (light) therapy (LLLT) has been known since 1967 but still remains controversial due to incomplete understanding of the basic mechanisms and the selection of inappropriate dosimetric parameters that led to negative studies. The biphasic dose-response or Arndt-Schulz curve in LLLT has been shown both in vitro studies and in animal experiments. This review will provide an update to our previous (Huang et al. 2009) coverage of this topic. In vitro mediators of LLLT such as adenosine triphosphate (ATP) and mitochondrial membrane potential show biphasic patterns, while others such as mitochondrial reactive oxygen species show a triphasic dose-response with two distinct peaks. The Janus nature of reactive oxygen species (ROS) that may act as a beneficial signaling molecule at low concentrations and a harmful cytotoxic agent at high concentrations, may partly explain the observed responses in vivo. Transcranial LLLT for traumatic brain injury (TBI) in mice shows a distinct biphasic pattern with peaks in beneficial neurological effects observed when the number of treatments is varied, and when the energy density of an individual treatment is varied. Further understanding of the extent to which biphasic dose responses apply in LLLT will be necessary to optimize clinical treatments. © 2011 University of Massachusetts.


PubMed | Huntington University and THOR Photomedicine Ltd
Type: | Journal: Journal of biophotonics | Year: 2016

Hearing loss is a serious occupational health problem worldwide. Noise, aminoglycoside antibiotics and chemotherapeutic drugs induce hearing loss through changes in metabolic functions resulting in sensory cell death in the cochlea. Metabolic sequelae from noise exposure increase production of nitric oxide (NO) and Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS) contributing to higher levels of oxidative stress beyond the physiologic threshold levels of intracellular repair. Photobiomodulation (PBM) therapy is a light treatment involving endogenous chromophores commonly used to reduce inflammation and promote tissue repair. Near infrared light (NIR) from Light Emitting Diodes (LED) at 810 nm wavelength were used as a biochemical modulator of cytokine response in cultured HEI-OC1 auditory cells placed under oxidative stress. Results reported here show that NIR PBM at 810 nm, 30mW/cm


Khuman J.,Harvard University | Zhang J.,Harvard University | Park J.,Harvard University | Carroll J.D.,THOR Photomedicine Ltd. | And 2 more authors.
Journal of Neurotrauma | Year: 2012

Low-level laser light therapy (LLLT) exerts beneficial effects on motor and histopathological outcomes after experimental traumatic brain injury (TBI), and coherent near-infrared light has been reported to improve cognitive function in patients with chronic TBI. However, the effects of LLLT on cognitive recovery in experimental TBI are unknown. We hypothesized that LLLT administered after controlled cortical impact (CCI) would improve post-injury Morris water maze (MWM) performance. Low-level laser light (800nm) was applied directly to the contused parenchyma or transcranially in mice beginning 60-80min after CCI. Injured mice treated with 60J/cm 2 (500mW/cm 2×2min) either transcranially or via an open craniotomy had modestly improved latency to the hidden platform (p<0.05 for group), and probe trial performance (p<0.01) compared to non-treated controls. The beneficial effects of LLLT in open craniotomy mice were associated with reduced microgliosis at 48h (21.8±2.3 versus 39.2±4.2 IbA-1+ cells/200×field, p<0.05). Little or no effect of LLLT on post-injury cognitive function was observed using the other doses, a 4-h administration time point and 7-day administration of 60J/cm 2. No effect of LLLT (60J/cm 2 open craniotomy) was observed on post-injury motor function (days 1-7), brain edema (24h), nitrosative stress (24h), or lesion volume (14 days). Although further dose optimization and mechanism studies are needed, the data suggest that LLLT might be a therapeutic option to improve cognitive recovery and limit inflammation after TBI. © 2012, Mary Ann Liebert, Inc.


Trademark
THOR Photomedicine Ltd. | Date: 2016-08-16

Infrared radiator units for therapeutic purposes; Phototherapeutic apparatus for medical purposes.

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