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Esposito V.,Third Division Cotugno Hospital | Manente L.,The Second University of Naples | Viglietti R.,Third Division Cotugno Hospital | Parrella G.,Third Division Cotugno Hospital | And 7 more authors.
In Vivo | Year: 2012

Highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART therapy) for HIV-1 infection has significantly increased the survival and quality of life of patients with this disease. However, in several epidemiological studies the onset of metabolic syndrome is a phenomenon reported to be extremely frequent. In the present study, genes involved in the molecular cascade responsible for the alteration of fat tissue and of lipid and glucose metabolism in patients with HIV-1 infection treated with antiretroviral therapy were identified. Towards this goal, hybridization using Atlas cDNA Expression Arrays allowed simultaneous monitoring of the expression levels of approximately 250 genes and identification of a panel of changes in relation to different therapeutic groups and in the presence of metabolic syndrome, with some genes being up-regulated, while others are down-regulated in the different subgroups of patients. The results of this analysis have shown a panel of transcriptional changes associated with oxidative stress mechanisms that provide a basis for further studies on understanding of mechanisms that, in vivo, are the foundation the metabolic disorders in patients with HIV infection. Source


Esposito V.,Third Division Cotugno Hospital | Manente L.,The Second University of Naples | Lucariello A.,The Second University of Naples | Perna A.,The Second University of Naples | And 7 more authors.
Journal of Cellular Biochemistry | Year: 2012

The highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) can cause a metabolic syndrome consisting of lipodystropy/lipoatrophy, dyslipidemia, and type 2 diabetes mellitus with an increased cardiovascular risk. The pathogenetic bases of HAART-associated lipodystrophy are poorly known. A genetic screen was used to evaluate proteins that are modulated in HIV-1-infected patients with or without lipodystrophy syndrome, that are routinely treated with HAART regimens. The most significant modulation was represented by FAP48 expression. Stable over-expression of FAP48 was able to alter, in vitro, adipogenesis, acting both on calcineurin and glucocorticoid pathways. Finally, we demonstrated that FAP48 over-expression was able to influence the capacity of some HIV drugs, Saquinavir and Efavirenz, but not Stavudine, Amprenavir, and Indinavir to inhibit adipocyte formation. In conclusion, this molecule could be a potential target for novel therapeutic approaches to the HAART related lipodystrophy in HIV patients. J. Cell. Biochem. 113: 3446-3454, 2012. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Source


Manente L.,The Second University of Naples | Lucariello A.,The Second University of Naples | Costanzo C.,The Second University of Naples | Viglietti R.,Third Division Cotugno Hospital | And 6 more authors.
In Vivo | Year: 2012

In the present study, we investigated the ability of anti-HIV drugs to interfere with normal cell cycle progression and to induce oxidative stress by perturbing the redox environment. Our results provide evidence that anti-HIV drugs have a differential effect on adipocyte cell cycle and differentiation, being able to modify the response to oxidative stress through an increase of reactive oxygen species (ROS) that compromises the induction of phase-2 and antioxidant enzymes. In detail, saquinavir, efavirenz, and stavudine exert antiadipogenic influences on the model 3T3-L1 cell line, perturbing the oxidative response and inducing of apoptosis. When considered together, the effects of anti-HIV drugs on 3T3-L1 pre adipocytes are distinct but commonly antiadipogenic, thus suggesting another additional possible mechanism by which antiretroviral therapies could contribute to lipoatrophy. Source

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