Thermal Analysis

San Pablo de la Moraleja, Spain

Thermal Analysis

San Pablo de la Moraleja, Spain

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News Article | February 21, 2017
Site: globenewswire.com

PALO ALTO, Calif., Feb. 21, 2017 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- A new Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) report finds that a limited number of bulk-power transformers would be at potential risk of thermal damage due to a single high-altitude electromagnetic pulse (HEMP) attack, but that additional work is needed to fully investigate the impact to the entire bulk-power system. HEMP is caused by the detonation of a nuclear weapon above the earth's surface and is characterized by a high-magnitude, short duration pulse (E1), an intermediate pulse similar to lightning (E2), and a late-time component (E3), which is similar to a severe geomagnetic disturbance event. Potential impacts can range from damage to electronic components and insulators (E1 and E2) to voltage collapse and transformer damage (E3). The EPRI report, "Magnetohydrodynamic Electromagnetic Pulse (MHD-EMP) Assessment of the Continental U.S. Electric Grid: GIC and Transformer Thermal Analysis," evaluated the E3 grid impacts from a single high-altitude nuclear burst over 11 target locations. It included a geomagnetically induced current (GIC) analysis and transformer thermal assessment. The study used modeling and assessment techniques and included bulk-power transformers, which convert high-voltage electricity from one transmission voltage to another enabling it to move from a generation source to the end user. It found between 3 and 14 transformers would be at potential risk of thermal damage; however, the risk from thermal damage does not suggest that they would be rendered inoperable during an E3 event. Rather the results indicate that while transformers may be at risk of damage, further analysis would be needed to understand the extent of damage using asset and system specific data, including the condition of the transformer. "HEMP is a complex and challenging issue," said Rob Manning, EPRI vice president of Transmission and Distribution. "This report provides the technical basis that is needed before an effective strategy to mitigate the effects of HEMP can be developed. There is still a lot of work to be done in order to better understand how HEMP may impact grid reliability and recovery efforts. "This assessment indicates that the failure of a large number of bulk-power transformers due to thermal damage from E3 is unlikely. But the study results should not be interpreted to indicate that it is not a potential problem since impacts related to widespread outages due to voltage collapse are still being investigated," he said. In April 2016, EPRI, in collaboration with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), started a comprehensive three-year research project to provide a technical basis by which electric companies can address the HEMP threat by evaluating potential impacts, hardening and mitigation options, and recovery plans. (To see the DOE project outline click on this link.) EPRI is also collaborating with utilities and several national laboratories. To view the report, click on this link. About EPRI The Electric Power Research Institute, Inc. (EPRI, www.epri.com) conducts research and development relating to the generation, delivery and use of electricity for the benefit of the public. An independent, nonprofit organization, EPRI brings together its scientists and engineers as well as experts from academia and industry to help address challenges in electricity, including reliability, efficiency, affordability, health, safety and the environment. EPRI's members represent approximately 90 percent of the electricity generated and delivered in the United States, and international participation extends to more than 30 countries. EPRI's principal offices and laboratories are located in Palo Alto, CA.; Charlotte, NC; Knoxville, TN.; and Lenox, MA.


Pato-Doldan B.,University of La Coruña | Sanchez-Andujar M.,University of La Coruña | Gomez-Aguirre L.C.,University of La Coruña | Yanez-Vilar S.,University of La Coruña | And 6 more authors.
Physical Chemistry Chemical Physics | Year: 2012

We report that the hybrid organic-inorganic compound [(CH3) 2NH2][Mg(HCOO)3] shows a marked dielectric transition around Tt ∼ 270 K, associated to a structural phase transition from SG R3c (centrosymmetric) to Cc (non-centrosymmetric). This is the highest Tt reported so far for a perovskite-like formate that is thus a promising candidate to display electric order very close to room temperature. This journal is © the Owner Societies 2012.


Gracia-Fernandez C.A.,Thermal Analysis | Gomez-Barreiro S.,University College Dublin | Lopez-Beceiro J.,Polytechnic University of Mozambique | Naya S.,Polytechnic University of Mozambique | Artiaga R.,Polytechnic University of Mozambique
Journal of Materials Research | Year: 2012

Poly(l-lactic acid) (PLLA) is one of the most studied biopolymers nowadays. Due to its good performance, it constitutes an alternative to petrochemical-derived polymers. It was largely studied by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and temperature-modulated DSC. Nevertheless, there is an ongoing debate of what happens at the overlapping melting processes. In the present work, the experimental setups are discussed. Different modulation conditions are proposed for the study of the glass transition, cold crystallization, and the two reported melting processes. Finally, the experimental results allowed to measure the heat capacity change at the cold crystallization and a correct interpretation of what happens at the reported double melting peak of PLLA, which involves the existence of three crystalline structures. © Copyright Materials Research Society 2012.


Lopez-Paz J.,University of La Coruña | Gracia-Fernandez C.,Thermal Analysis | Gomez-Barreiro S.,University College Dublin | Lopez-Beceiro J.,University of La Coruña | And 2 more authors.
Journal of Materials Research | Year: 2012

Asphalt bitumens are complex colloidal systems of high viscosity and complex behavior, which are mainly used for making asphalt concrete for road surfaces. Thermal and rheological characterizations are needed to understand their complex behavior, particularly at the processing stage. Prediction of properties at short and long observation times is usually performed through time-temperature superposition (TTS) models, which make use of some calculated shift factors. The influence of crystallization-like transformation processes on the validity of these shift factors is investigated here by temperature-modulated differential scanning calorimetry (TMDSC). Four asphalt emulsions are considered in this work, each one with a specific transformation behavior. The structure-properties relationships are explained on the basis of the transformation profiles and rheological data. © Copyright Materials Research Society 2012.


Lopez-Beceiro J.,University of La Coruña | Gracia-Fernandez C.,Thermal Analysis | Artiaga R.,University of La Coruña
European Polymer Journal | Year: 2013

A model describing the low temperature solid state phase transformation kinetics observed in a metal organic framework by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) at several cooling rates is modified so that the reaction rate is now expressed as a function of time and temperature. Thus, when applied to ramp data, the new model exactly matches the former one but, additionally, it allows to explain isothermal data. The new model is tested for primary crystallizations of two polymers from the molten state, using DSC data, cooling ramp experiments at several cooling rates and isothermal experiments. Good fittings were obtained at all the varied experimental conditions with both polymers. The model makes use of three fitting parameters with physical meaning: an upper critical temperature, Tc, an energy barrier, and a reaction-order, n + 1. Additionally, and previously to perform the kinetic fitting, the dependence of the time to the maximum crystallization rate peak on the isothermal temperature was investigated. That dependence was found to follow a simple model which makes use of two parameters related to the limits of the temperature range in which the crystallization may occur. The polymers used in this work were a commercial extruded polyamide and pristine syndiotactic polypropylene. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.


News Article | October 28, 2016
Site: www.prweb.com

METTLER TOLEDO is pleased to present “Thermal Analysis of Medical Materials” on October 27th, 2016. The English-language webinar is part of the leading lab technology company’s year-long thermal analysis series. Covering the testing of medical materials across common thermal analysis methods, the presentation will repeat live three times to allow participation from around the globe. For a list of times and to register, please click here. The health care industry continues to drive research in the field of medical materials. This includes the development of new materials used in innovative products to assist in patient care. However, with each new material comes a need to assure its safety and performance. Thermal analysis offers an ideal method to do so. Using thermal analysis, materials properties can be measured as function of temperature or time over a temperature range from –150 to 1600 °C. Additionally, only a few milligrams of a substance is generally sufficient to measure properties that contribute to performance and longevity, such as glass transition point, expansion coefficient, melting point, and elasticity. This makes thermal analysis cost-effective in an industry where maintaining margin is critical. The presentation will cover basic properties of medical materials, the primary methods of thermal analysis applied (DSC, TGA, TMA and DMA), and typical representative applications. A Q&A after the presentation will allow you to obtain answers to specific application questions. To learn more about the advantages of using thermal analysis to characterize health care materials both for cost-effective initial product development as well as ongoing quality control, register for the live presentation today. Users can also access free, on-demand thermal analysis webinars and dedicated thermal analysis e-training for additional information on these useful methods. About METTLER TOLEDO METTLER TOLEDO is a leading global manufacturer of precision instruments. The Company is the world’s largest manufacturer and marketer of weighing instruments for use in laboratory, industrial and food retailing applications. The Company also holds top-three market positions for several related analytical instruments and is a leading provider of automated chemistry systems used in drug and chemical compound discovery and development. In addition, the Company is the world’s largest manufacturer and marketer of metal detection systems used in production and packaging. Additional information about METTLER TOLEDO can be found at http://www.mt.com.


News Article | November 7, 2016
Site: www.prweb.com

METTLER TOLEDO is pleased to present “Quality Control by Thermal Analysis” on November 24th, 2016. The English-language webinar is part of the leading lab technology company’s year-long thermal analysis series. Covering thermal analysis principles and practical applications, the presentation will repeat live three times to allow participation from around the globe. For a list of times and to register, please click here. The webinar will present the five primary thermal analysis techniques: differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), thermomechanical analysis (TMA), dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA) and thermal values. It will then explore real-world example applications that show why thermal analysis’ role in quality control continues to expand. Parameters defined through thermal analyses are ideal for characterizing products ranging from polymers and pharmaceuticals to metals. Thermal analysis allows the definition of important aspects such as heat capacity, glass transition point, expansion coefficient, melting/dropping point, and elasticity. Additionally, because thermal analysis methods typically use just a few milligrams of sample and obtain results quite quickly, they keep quality control costs low. Small samples sizes can be especially helpful when working with rare or expensive substances. To explore thermal analysis in quality control and review ways it might be incorporated into your own processes, register for the free session today. Participants will have an opportunity to ask questions of METTLER TOLEDO experts in a Q&A after the presentation. For additional information, consider viewing one of our free, on-demand thermal analysis webinars or dedicated thermal analysis e-training as well. About METTLER TOLEDO METTLER TOLEDO is a leading global manufacturer of precision instruments. The Company is the world’s largest manufacturer and marketer of weighing instruments for use in laboratory, industrial and food retailing applications. The Company also holds top-three market positions for several related analytical instruments and is a leading provider of automated chemistry systems used in drug and chemical compound discovery and development. In addition, the Company is the world’s largest manufacturer and marketer of metal detection systems used in production and packaging. Additional information about METTLER TOLEDO can be found at http://www.mt.com.

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