Lancaster, PA, United States
Lancaster, PA, United States

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Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: H2020 | Program: RIA | Phase: EE-04-2016-2017 | Award Amount: 4.00M | Year: 2016

Rapid expansion of utilisation of solar thermal energy for increasing energy efficiency of buildings have been adopted in short/medium- and long-term Energy Strategies of EU countries in line with regional actions with the European climate energy objectives as defined in the European Unions 20-20-20 targets and in the European Commissions Energy Roadmap 2050. The overall objective of this project is to develop an innovative high performance and cost effective 2-kWel/18-kWth solar heat and power system for application in individual dwellings and small business residential buildings for on-site electricity and heat generation using solar thermal energy at temperature levels of 250-280 deg.C. The proposed technology will be laboratory validated and undergo filed tests on a demonstration site. The project will utilise the expertise of the consortium members in the development of small Organic Rankine Cycle plants, linear Fresnel mirror solar energy concentrating collectors; advanced heat pipe technologies for the thermal management; high performance Thermal Energy Storage systems on the basis of Phase Change Materials; smart control units for integration of solar thermal and boiler heating circuits. Also participants of this Project are experienced in integration of Renewable energy technologies into buildings, optimisation of complex plants and in analysis and predictions of socio-economic impact and in commercialisation of new Renewable energy products. It is estimated that the proposed technology will deliver 60% of domestic energy requirements and provide 20% reduction in energy costs and Green House Gas (GHG) emissions compared to the best existing low carbon energy technologies. In this way the project will also assist in improving the quality of life of population within and outside the EU and provide clean, efficient and secure energy to dwellings.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-IP | Phase: NMP-2008-1.2-1 | Award Amount: 8.22M | Year: 2009

Henix will translate promising laboratory based nanotechnology results into pilot lines for the production of nanofluid coolants. This project, conceived and led by its European industrial partners, is designed to improve the competitiveness of European industry by developing new and more efficient cooling technologies and processes; specifically a new, state of the art, nanofluid coolant with a significantly enhanced technological capabilities that will transform the design and performance of thermal management systems. Nanofluid coolants represent a new exploitation of nanotechnology that has only become possible as a result of recent advances in nanoparticle production and dispersion technology. The beneficial adoption of nanofluid coolants usually requires re-design of the whole system including heat exchangers, pumps, pipe work and operating points. The gains come from a subtle re-balancing of the pump power, heat losses, plant cost and thermal efficiency. Flow regimes and the geometry of cooling channels play a key role. Understanding how to design systems to realise these benefits is a bottleneck to industrial adoption of nanofluids coolants. The mechanism of how heat transfer is facilitated by nanoparticles in carrier fluids is not clearly understood by the global research community. Analytical Models as yet do not fully explain and predict the thermal performance of nanofluid coolants. The advancement of this knowledge will enable engineers to readily design heat systems using nanofluid coolants. The most promising application opportunities for nanofluid coolants reside in large information data centres containing computer servers and racks, power electronics and power electronics for electric drives. The project will stimulate and accelerate the industrial take-up of nanofluid coolants used to innovate next generation heat exchangers to more effectively cool equipment and machinery, significantly reducing energy consumption and costs by up to 50%.


Patent
Thermacore | Date: 2013-05-22

A warming unit and method for warming an infusion medium prior to introducing the medium into a patients body. The apparatus includes an outer casing, inlet and outlet tubes secured to the outer casing, a fluid conduit for transporting the infusion medium through the warming unit, and a heating element disposed proximate to the fluid conduit for warming the infusion medium flowing therethrough. The warming unit can form part of a system, which further includes a controller for controlling various functions of and separate from the warming unit, a reservoir containing the infusion medium, and a power source for powering the warming unit.


Grant
Agency: Department of Defense | Branch: Navy | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase II | Award Amount: 956.51K | Year: 2013

The proposed effort will seek to further design and develop vacuum brazed high density folded-fin modular heat exchangers. The scalability of these heat exchangers would provide a means for fabricating large area high performance cold plates by joining via friction stir welding. The advantages of this approach would be an increase in system performance, reliability and efficiency. From a manufacturing stand point the technology would establish the capability to facilitate future product improvement across a broad range of development programs.


Grant
Agency: National Aeronautics and Space Administration | Branch: | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase I | Award Amount: 124.56K | Year: 2014

Wick properties are often the limiting factor in a heat pipe design. Current technology uses conventional sintering of metal powders, screen wick, or grooves to fabricate realtively simplistic wick geometries. Additive manufacturing (laser sintering) of a porous structure would allow much greater freedom in defining the wick geometry and properties. One example is the RDU thermosyphon wick. Valuable real estate was consumed for a liquid reservoir for freeze/thaw tolerance. A more complex laser-sintered geometry could put the reservoir in the center, allowing greater evaporator area, lower heat flux, and lower DT. Another example is loop heat pipes, which are in limited use due to the cost. Laser sintering of an LHP directly in to the evaporator bodye could greatly lower cost, making LHP vaible for commercial use. Applying laser sintering to develop complex wick geometries can greatly extend heat pipe heat transport capabilities and lower cost.


Grant
Agency: Department of Defense | Branch: Navy | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase I | Award Amount: 79.68K | Year: 2012

In austere environments, erosion and corrosion seriously degrade the performance of airfoils in fan and compressor sections of gas turbine engines. To prevent damage to titanium airfoils, a powder metallurgy approach will be taken that produces a hard, erosion resistant leading edge. The leading edge should be strongly bonded to the blade body, have similar resonant characteristics (elastic modulus driven) as well as sufficiently similar to the chemistry of the blade body so as not to set up galvanic corrosion cells. The body of the blade will be fabricated using conventional powder to maintain the overall toughness of the blade in the event of large body ballistic impact. The approach that will be taken will be that of cryo-milling titanium alloy powder similar to that used in conventional blades, and using powder metallurgy techniques, such as HIP and CIP/HIP to assure that the hard, strong cryo-milled powder becomes an integral part of the leading edge of the blade. After milled and unmilled powders are placed so that the cryomilled powder will become the leading edge, consolidation will be followed by forging to obtain the proper airfoil shape.


Grant
Agency: Department of Defense | Branch: Navy | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase I | Award Amount: 79.88K | Year: 2012

To assure satisfactory cooling for future JSF upgrades, the proposed solution is a vapor compression refrigeration system packaged with both a pumped PAO cooling loop and a thermal energy storage (TES) system in a standard avionics rack for the JSF. The vapor compression system, VCS, will provide the sub-ambient cooling required as avionics power is increased. A VCS gives the highest efficiency for sub-ambient cooling. The pumped PAO loop will interface to the avionics racks. PAO is already an approved coolant for aircraft. The TES will store additional thermal capacity for the cooling system for high power transient excursions. Including this feature will increase mission capability during extreme operating conditions. The Phase 1 work effort involves a system design and subscale prototype technology emonstration.


Grant
Agency: Department of Defense | Branch: Navy | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase I | Award Amount: 149.99K | Year: 2012

The proposed effort will seek to design and develop vacuum brazed high density folded-fin modular heat exchangers. The scalability of these heat exchangers would provide a means for fabricating large area high performance cold plates by joining via friction stir welding. Friction stir welding is a solid-state joining process that results in minimal distortion of metal characteristics. The advantages of this approach would be an increase in system performance, reliability and efficiency. From a manufacturing stand point the technology would establish the capability to facilitate future product improvement across a broad range of development programs.


Grant
Agency: Department of Defense | Branch: | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase II | Award Amount: 749.22K | Year: 2010

To meet the goals of the Operationally Responsive Space program, the thermal control system must be robust, modular and scalable to cover the wide range of components, payloads, and missions. Innovative solutions that enable isothermal satellite structures and inter-panel connections are needed. kTC has demonstrated an innovative thermal distribution panel (TDP) consisting of a high conductivity (>800 W/mK) macro composite skin with in situ heat pipes. The processing technologies demonstrated can also be used to produce this panel with high structural stiffness, similar to aluminum honeycomb type structure currently in use. This advanced TDP material concept with its high conductance will obviate the need for bulky metal thermal doublers and heat pipe saddles. The conductivity of the proposed material system can be configured to exceed 800 W/mK with a mass density below 2.5 g/cm3. This material can provide efficient conductive heat transfer between the in situ heat pipes permitting the use of thinner panel thicknesses further reducing the mass of this critical spacecraft subsystem kTC proved the feasibility of producing the proposed TDP and confirmed by measurements the performance gains the technology affords in the Phase I program. The Phase II work will concentrate on process refinements and scale up. BENEFIT: The high conductance material to be demonstrated under this program would have immediate applications in Air Force systems, as well as other military, NASA, and commercial uses. Key potential post application relies heavily on the successful verification and certification of the proposed materials’ performance. With increasing acceptance, the technology will be attractive to high performance commercial (space based) applications. Enabling technologies will allow the increase of production and the realization of the economies of scale.


Grant
Agency: GTR | Branch: Innovate UK | Program: | Phase: Feasibility Study | Award Amount: 112.32K | Year: 2015

Heat Pipes are vital to the thermal management of high performance silicon chips and are present in virtually every new laptop computer. Thermacore is a world leader in heat pipe technology and specialises in thermal management of high performance electronic devices such as for military applications. To protect and expand its position at the high end of the market, Thermacore Europe (TCE) and Oxford nanoSystems (ONS) have, with Brunel University (BU), identified an opportunity to improve the maximum heat flux of a heat pipe by replacing or augmenting the current internal evaporative cooling surface with a high performance nano-coating. The expected benefits including higher power, lower weight and lower cost will allow the UK to maintain its lead in this high value part of the electronics market and the partners to expand into new areas of heat and energy management.

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