Theravalues Corporation

Tokyo, Japan

Theravalues Corporation

Tokyo, Japan
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Patent
Theravalues Corporation and Takeuchi | Date: 2017-01-25

Provided is a composition for oral intake, which exhibits improved oral absorbability of curcumin and/or an analog thereof and can be produced conveniently and inexpensively. A complex of curcumin and/or an analog thereof and a water-soluble cellulose derivative is disclosed.


Ishisaka M.,Gifu Pharmaceutical University | Kakefuda K.,Gifu Pharmaceutical University | Yamauchi M.,Gifu Pharmaceutical University | Tsuruma K.,Gifu Pharmaceutical University | And 4 more authors.
Biological and Pharmaceutical Bulletin | Year: 2011

Depression is a significant public health problem and some reports indicate an association between depression and endoplasmic reticulum stress. Luteolin is a flavonoid contained in many plants and with a variety of known pharmacological properties such as anti-inflammatory, anti-anxiety, and memory-improving effects, suggesting that luteolin penetrates into the brain. In the present study, we investigated the effects of luteolin on endoplasmic reticulum stress-induced neuronal cell death. Luteolin significantly suppressed tunicamycin-induced cell death at 1 to 10 μM in human neuroblastoma cells. Luteolin increased in the expression of the 78 kDa glucose-regulated protein and 94 kDa glucose-regulated protein and decreased in the cleavage activation of caspase-3. Additionally, to investigate whether chronic luteolin treatment has an antidepression effect, we performed some behavioral tests. Chronic luteolin treatment showed antidepressant-like effects in behavioral tests and, luteolin attenuated the expression of endoplasmic reticulum stress-related proteins in the hippocampus of corticosterone-treated depression model mice. These findings indicate that luteolin has antidepressant-like effects, partly due to the suppression of endoplasmic reticulum stress. © 2011 Pharmaceutical Society of Japan.


Kawanishi N.,Waseda University | Kato K.,Waseda University | Takahashi M.,Waseda University | Mizokami T.,Waseda University | And 5 more authors.
Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications | Year: 2013

Downhill running causes muscle damage, and induces oxidative stress and inflammatory reaction. Recently, it is shown that curcumin possesses anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory potentials. Interestingly, curcumin reduces inflammatory cytokine concentrations in skeletal muscle after downhill running of mice. However, it is not known whether curcumin affects oxidative stress after downhill running-induced muscle damage. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of curcumin on oxidative stress following downhill running induced-muscle damage. We also investigated whether curcumin affects macrophage infiltration via chemokines such as MCP-1 and CXCL14. Male C57BL/6 mice were divided into four groups; rest, rest plus curcumin, downhill running, or downhill running plus curcumin. Downhill running mice ran at 22. m/min, -15% grade on the treadmill for 150. min. Curcumin (3. mg) was administered in oral administration immediately after downhill running. Hydrogen peroxide concentration and NADPH-oxidase mRNA expression in the downhill running mice were significantly higher than those in the rest mice, but these variables were significantly attenuated by curcumin administration in downhill running mice. In addition, mRNA expression levels of MCP-1, CXCL14 and F4/80 reflecting presence of macrophages in the downhill running mice were significantly higher than those in the rest mice. However, MCP-1 and F4/80 mRNA expression levels were significantly attenuated by curcumin administration in downhill running mice. Curcumin may attenuate oxidative stress following downhill running-induced muscle damage. © 2013 Elsevier Inc.


Kanai M.,Kyoto University | Otsuka Y.,Theravalues Corporation | Otsuka K.,Akita University | Sato M.,Hokkaido Information University | And 11 more authors.
Cancer Chemotherapy and Pharmacology | Year: 2013

Background: A growing number of preclinical studies have demonstrated that curcumin could be a promising anticancer drug; however, poor bioavailability has been the major obstacle for its clinical application. To overcome this problem, we developed a new form of curcumin (Theracurmin®) and reported high plasma curcumin levels could be safely achieved after a single administration of Theracurmin® in healthy volunteers. In this study, we aimed to evaluate the safety of repetitive administration of Theracurmin® in cancer patients. Methods: Pancreatic or biliary tract cancer patients who failed standard chemotherapy were eligible for this study. Based on our previous pharmacokinetic study, we selected Theracurmin® containing 200 mg of curcumin (Level 1) as a starting dose, and the dose was safely escalated to Level 2, which contained 400 mg of curcumin. Theracurmin® was orally administered every day with standard gemcitabine-based chemotherapy. In addition to safety and pharmacokinetics data, NF-κB activity, cytokine levels, efficacy, and quality-of-life score were evaluated. Results: Ten patients were assigned to level 1 and six were to level 2. Peak plasma curcumin levels (median) after Theracurmin® administration were 324 ng/mL (range, 47-1,029 ng/mL) at Level 1 and 440 ng/mL (range, 179-1,380 ng/mL) at Level 2. No unexpected adverse events were observed and 3 patients safely continued Theracurmin® administration for >9 months. Conclusions: Repetitive systemic exposure to high concentrations of curcumin achieved by Theracurmin® did not increase the incidence of adverse events in cancer patients receiving gemcitabine-based chemotherapy. © 2013 Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg.


Nakagawa Y.,National Hospital Organization | Mukai S.,National Hospital Organization | Yamada S.,National Hospital Organization | Matsuoka M.,National Hospital Organization | And 6 more authors.
Journal of Orthopaedic Science | Year: 2014

Background: We previously developed a surface-controlled water-dispersible form of curcumin and named it Theracurmin® (Theracurmin; Theravalues, Tokyo, Japan). The area under the blood concentration–time curve of Theracurmin in humans was 27-fold higher than that of curcumin powder. We determined the clinical effects of orally administered Theracurmin in patients with knee osteoarthritis during 8 weeks of treatment.Methods: Fifty patients with knee osteoarthritis of Kellgren–Lawrence grade II or III and who were aged more than 40 years were enrolled in this randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, prospective clinical study. Placebo or Theracurmin containing 180 mg/day of curcumin was administered orally every day for 8 weeks. To monitor adverse events, blood biochemistry analyses were performed before and after 8 weeks of each intervention. The patients’ knee symptoms were evaluated at 0, 2, 4, 6, and 8 weeks by the Japanese Knee Osteoarthritis Measure, the knee pain visual analog scale (VAS), the knee scoring system of the Japanese Orthopedic Association, and the need for nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs.Results: At 8 weeks after treatment initiation, knee pain VAS scores were significantly lower in the Theracurmin group than in the placebo group, except in the patients with initial VAS scores of 0.15 or less. Theracurmin lowered the celecoxib dependence significantly more than placebo. No major side effects were observed with Theracurmin treatment.Conclusion: Theracurmin shows modest potential for the treatment of human knee osteoarthritis. © 2014, The Author(s).


Patent
Theravalues Corporation and University of Tokyo | Date: 2012-07-19

Provided are a medicine and a food product that suppress a heart disease such as cardiomegaly and heart failure. Specifically provided is an agent for suppressing a heart disease selected from heart failure, cardiac fibrosis, ventricular wall thickening and cardiomegaly, which comprises luteolin or a derivative thereof as an active ingredient.


Trademark
Theravalues Corporation | Date: 2013-01-29

Dietary and nutritional supplements, health food supplements, vitamin supplements, nutritional drinks used for meal replacement, powdered nutritional supplement drink mix, medicated candy, fodder additives for medical purposes, turmeric supplements; herbal supplements, namely, turmeric.


Trademark
Theravalues Corporation | Date: 2010-05-06

Chemical additives for use in the manufacture of food, chemical additives for use in the manufacture of beverages, chemical additives for use in the manufacture of pharmaceuticals; plant extracts, namely, turmeric used in the manufacture of food, beverages and pharmaceuticals. Colorants, colorants for use in the manufacture of food, colorants for use in the manufacture of beverages, colorants for use in the manufacture of pharmaceuticals. Dietary and nutritional supplements, health food supplements, vitamin supplements, nutritional drinks used for meal replacement, powdered nutritional supplement drink mix, medicated candy, fodder additives for medical purposes, turmeric supplements; herbal supplements, namely, turmeric. Edible turmeric, coffee, tea, candy, cookies, processed cereals. Energy drinks containing nutritional supplements, beer, whey beverages, fruit juices, vegetable juices, isotonic beverages, syrups for making non-alcoholic beverages, non-alcoholic effervescing beverages prepared with pastilles, non-alcoholic beverages, namely, carbonated drinks, fruit juices, vegetable juices and isotonic beverages containing turmeric.


Trademark
Theravalues Corporation | Date: 2010-05-05

Chemical additives for use in the manufacture of food, chemical additives for use in the manufacture of beverages, chemical additives for use in the manufacture of pharmaceuticals; plant extracts, namely, turmeric used in the manufacture of food, beverages and pharmaceuticals. Colorants, colorants for use in the manufacture of food, colorants for use in the manufacture of beverages, colorants for use in the manufacture of pharmaceuticals. Edible turmeric, coffee, tea, candy, cookies, processed cereals. Energy drinks containing nutritional supplements, beer, whey beverages, fruit juices, vegetable juices, isotonic beverages, syrups for making non-alcoholic beverages, non-alcoholic effervescing beverages prepared with pastilles, non-alcoholic beverages, namely, carbonated drinks, fruit juices, vegetable juices and isotonic beverages containing turmeric.


PubMed | Theravalues Corporation and Chubu University
Type: | Journal: Molecular nutrition & food research | Year: 2016

Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) is a type of incretin secreted from enteroendocrine L-cells. Our previous studies demonstrated that curcumin (a yellow pigment of turmeric) significantly increases the secretion of GLP-1 in enteroendocrine L cell line (GLUTag cells). However, it is not clear whether its action in vivo directly enhances GLP-1 secretion, which then leads to a reduction in blood glucose levels via the stimulation of insulin secretion. In addition, the molecular target of curcumin-induced GLP-1 secretion has not been clarified.Glucose tolerance was significantly improved in rats after pre-administered curcumin (1.5 mg/kg) followed by intraperitoneal glucose injections via the stimulation of GLP-1 secretion and the induction of insulin secretion. In GLUTag cells, curcumin-induced GLP-1 secretion was associated with G protein-coupled receptor (GPR) 40/120. Furthermore, the glucose-lowering effect induced by curcumin was significantly reduced after the administration of a GPR40/120 antagonist in rats.These findings demonstrate the biological function of curcumin as a GLP-1 secretagogue and the possible molecular target that mediates GLP-1 secretion. Increases in the secretion of endogenous GLP-1 induced by curcumin may allow the dosages of other diabetic medicines to be reduced and aid in the prevention of diabetes.

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