The Webb Schools

Claremont, CA, United States

The Webb Schools

Claremont, CA, United States
SEARCH FILTERS
Time filter
Source Type

News Article | May 23, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

Researchers have found the tooth of a Triceratops-like dinosaur in Mississippi, USA. This fossil is the first discovery of a horned dinosaur in eastern North America, suggesting these dinosaurs could roam freely across North America A chance discovery in Mississippi provides the first evidence of an animal closely related to Triceratops in eastern North America. The fossil, a tooth from rocks between 68 and 66 million years old, shows that two halves of the continent previously thought to be separated by seaway were probably connected before the end of the Age of Dinosaurs. "The fossil is small, only the size of a quarter, but it packs a ton of information," said Andrew Farke, a paleontologist at the Raymond M. Alf Museum of Paleontology at The Webb Schools in Claremont, California, and one of the authors of the paper announcing the discovery in the journal PeerJ. "The shape of this tooth, with its distinctive split root, is absolutely unique among dinosaurs," Farke continued. "We only have the one fossil, but it's more than enough to show that an animal very similar to Triceratops-perhaps even Triceratops itself-made it into eastern North America." Horned dinosaurs, or ceratopsids, had previously only been found in western North America and Asia. A seaway down the middle of North America, which linked the Arctic Ocean and Gulf of Mexico, split the continent into eastern and western halves during much of the Late Cretaceous (around 95 to 66 million years ago). This means that animals that evolved in western North America after the split-including ceratopsids-were prevented from traveling east. Due to a lack of preserved rock and fossils, scientists weren't sure precisely when the seaway disappeared and animals could once again walk freely across North America. The newly described fossil strongly suggests that this happened when large dinosaurs such as Tyrannosaurus and Triceratops were still around, before the major global extinction 66 million years ago. George Phillips, paleontology curator at the Mississippi Department of Wildlife, Fisheries, and Parks' Museum of Natural Science and co-author of the paper, discovered the fossil in the Owl Creek Formation in northern Mississippi. Phillips described the moment of discovery: "I was excited because I knew it was a dinosaur tooth, and dinosaur fossils are rare discoveries east of the Mississippi River. I called my volunteer, Michael Estes, over to share in the discovery, and he was beside me in seconds. I knew it wasn't a duck-billed dinosaur, and within 30 minutes of having found it, I posted on Facebook that I'd collected some rare plant-eating dinosaur tooth. It was none other than my colleague Lynn Harrell who made the suggestion, within minutes of my post, that it looked like a ceratopsian tooth." Although previously known fragments indicated horned dinosaurs in Maryland and North Carolina, those fossils were of more "primitive" species that likely lived in the area well before it was separated from western North America. "The discovery is shocking because fossils of ceratopsid horned dinosaurs had never been discovered previously from eastern North America. It's certainly the most unique and important vertebrate fossil discovery I've ever made," said Phillips. The ceratopsid tooth, from the lower jaw of the animal, was found in the Owl Creek Formation in northern Mississippi. Although that part of the state was under water at the time, it was fairly close to land. Farke and Phillips speculate that the tooth probably washed out to sea from a horned dinosaur living along the coastline in that area. The fossil is housed at the Mississippi Museum of Natural Sciences, and the research is published in the journal PeerJ. Link to the Published Version of the article (quote this link in your story - the link will ONLY work after the embargo lifts): https:/ your readers will be able to freely access this article at this URL. Citation to the article: Farke, A. A., and G. E. Phillips. 2017. The first reported ceratopsid dinosaur from eastern North America (Owl Creek Formation, Upper Cretaceous, Mississippi, USA). PeerJ 5:e3342. http://dx. PeerJ is an Open Access publisher of two peer-reviewed journals and a preprint server. PeerJ is based in San Diego, CA and the UK and can be accessed at https:/ . PeerJ's mission is to help the world efficiently publish its knowledge. All works published in PeerJ are Open Access and published using a Creative Commons license (CC-BY 4.0). Everything is immediately available--to read, download, redistribute, include in databases and otherwise use--without cost to anyone, anywhere, subject only to the condition that the original authors and source are properly attributed. PeerJ has an Editorial Board of over 1,600 respected academics, including 5 Nobel Laureates. PeerJ was the recipient of the 2013 ALPSP Award for Publishing Innovation. PeerJ Media Resources (including logos) can be found at: https:/ Andrew Farke, Ph.D. (author of paper) Augustyn Family Curator Raymond M. Alf Museum of Paleontology at The Webb Schools 1175 West Baseline Road Claremont, CA 91711 Phone: 1-909-482-5244 (office) Email: afarke@webb.org George Phillips (author of paper and discoverer of fossil) Paleontology Curator Mississippi Museum of Natural Science Mississippi Department of Wildlife, Fisheries, & Parks 2148 Riverside Drive Jackson, Mississippi 39202-1353 Phone: 1-601-576-6063 (office) Email: George.Phillips@mmns.state.ms.us Note: If you would like to join the PeerJ Press Release list, please register at: http://bit.


News Article | May 23, 2017
Site: news.yahoo.com

A fossil tooth of the triceratops or a very close relative has been discovered in the eastern US about 66 to 68 million years ago. Horned ceratopsid dinosaurs, which include triceratops, were only thought to have lived in the west of the US. At this time, the east and west of the country were divided by a large seaway stretching from the Arctic Ocean to the Gulf of Mexico. It was thought to be big enough to stop dinosaurs crossing from one side to the other. But the ceratopsids, at least, did make it across to the east. The tooth, from the lower jaw of the dinosaur, was discovered in the Owl Creek Formation in northern Mississippi. The dinosaur lived in the last days of the Cretaceous Period, which ended 66 million years ago due to an asteroid strike that wiped them out. Don't miss: Ash from large ancient volcano eruption at the edge of Siberia ended up halfway round the world "The discovery is shocking because fossils of ceratopsid horned dinosaurs had never been discovered previously from eastern North America. It's certainly the most unique and important vertebrate fossil discovery I've ever made," said study author George Phillips, palaeontology curator at the Museum of Natural Science at the Mississippi Department of Wildlife, Fisheries and Parks. The find suggests that the seaway dividing the east from the west may have dried up towards the end of the Cretaceous, allowing dinosaurs such as triceratops and Tyrannosaurus rex to travel through. Most popular: Southern hemisphere's biggest wave ever strikes buoy 400 miles from New Zealand coast "I was excited because I knew it was a dinosaur tooth, and dinosaur fossils are rare discoveries east of the Mississippi River," said Phillips, who discovered the fossil. The authors predict that further investigation in the east of the US will reveal more dinosaurs previously thought to be confined to the west. "The fossil is small, only the size of a quarter, but it packs a tonne of information," said Andrew Farke of the Raymond M. Alf Museum of Paleontology at The Webb Schools in Claremont, California, also an author of the study. "The shape of this tooth, with its distinctive split root, is absolutely unique among dinosaurs. We only have the one fossil, but it's more than enough to show that an animal very similar to Triceratops – perhaps even Triceratops itself – made it into eastern North America." The fossil tooth is described in a paper published in the journal PeerJ. You may be interested in:


News Article | May 23, 2017
Site: www.rdmag.com

A chance discovery in Mississippi provides the first evidence of an animal closely related to Triceratops in eastern North America. The fossil, a tooth from rocks between 68 and 66 million years old, shows that two halves of the continent previously thought to be separated by seaway were probably connected before the end of the Age of Dinosaurs. "The fossil is small, only the size of a quarter, but it packs a ton of information," said Andrew Farke, a paleontologist at the Raymond M. Alf Museum of Paleontology at The Webb Schools in Claremont, California, and one of the authors of the paper announcing the discovery in the journal PeerJ. "The shape of this tooth, with its distinctive split root, is absolutely unique among dinosaurs," Farke continued. "We only have the one fossil, but it's more than enough to show that an animal very similar to Triceratops-perhaps even Triceratops itself-made it into eastern North America." Horned dinosaurs, or ceratopsids, had previously only been found in western North America and Asia. A seaway down the middle of North America, which linked the Arctic Ocean and Gulf of Mexico, split the continent into eastern and western halves during much of the Late Cretaceous (around 95 to 66 million years ago). This means that animals that evolved in western North America after the split-including ceratopsids-were prevented from traveling east. Due to a lack of preserved rock and fossils, scientists weren't sure precisely when the seaway disappeared and animals could once again walk freely across North America. The newly described fossil strongly suggests that this happened when large dinosaurs such as Tyrannosaurus and Triceratops were still around, before the major global extinction 66 million years ago. George Phillips, paleontology curator at the Mississippi Department of Wildlife, Fisheries, and Parks' Museum of Natural Science and co-author of the paper, discovered the fossil in the Owl Creek Formation in northern Mississippi. Phillips described the moment of discovery: "I was excited because I knew it was a dinosaur tooth, and dinosaur fossils are rare discoveries east of the Mississippi River. I called my volunteer, Michael Estes, over to share in the discovery, and he was beside me in seconds. I knew it wasn't a duck-billed dinosaur, and within 30 minutes of having found it, I posted on Facebook that I'd collected some rare plant-eating dinosaur tooth. It was none other than my colleague Lynn Harrell who made the suggestion, within minutes of my post, that it looked like a ceratopsian tooth." Although previously known fragments indicated horned dinosaurs in Maryland and North Carolina, those fossils were of more "primitive" species that likely lived in the area well before it was separated from western North America. "The discovery is shocking because fossils of ceratopsid horned dinosaurs had never been discovered previously from eastern North America. It's certainly the most unique and important vertebrate fossil discovery I've ever made," said Phillips. The ceratopsid tooth, from the lower jaw of the animal, was found in the Owl Creek Formation in northern Mississippi. Although that part of the state was under water at the time, it was fairly close to land. Farke and Phillips speculate that the tooth probably washed out to sea from a horned dinosaur living along the coastline in that area. The fossil is housed at the Mississippi Museum of Natural Sciences, and the research is published in the journal PeerJ.


News Article | May 25, 2017
Site: www.sciencedaily.com

A chance discovery in Mississippi provides the first evidence of an animal closely related to Triceratops in eastern North America. The fossil, a tooth from rocks between 68 and 66 million years old, shows that two halves of the continent previously thought to be separated by seaway were probably connected before the end of the Age of Dinosaurs. "The fossil is small, only the size of a quarter, but it packs a ton of information," said Andrew Farke, a paleontologist at the Raymond M. Alf Museum of Paleontology at The Webb Schools in Claremont, California, and one of the authors of the paper announcing the discovery in the journal PeerJ. "The shape of this tooth, with its distinctive split root, is absolutely unique among dinosaurs," Farke continued. "We only have the one fossil, but it's more than enough to show that an animal very similar to Triceratops-perhaps even Triceratops itself-made it into eastern North America." Horned dinosaurs, or ceratopsids, had previously only been found in western North America and Asia. A seaway down the middle of North America, which linked the Arctic Ocean and Gulf of Mexico, split the continent into eastern and western halves during much of the Late Cretaceous (around 95 to 66 million years ago). This means that animals that evolved in western North America after the split-including ceratopsids-were prevented from traveling east. Due to a lack of preserved rock and fossils, scientists weren't sure precisely when the seaway disappeared and animals could once again walk freely across North America. The newly described fossil strongly suggests that this happened when large dinosaurs such as Tyrannosaurus and Triceratops were still around, before the major global extinction 66 million years ago. George Phillips, paleontology curator at the Mississippi Department of Wildlife, Fisheries, and Parks' Museum of Natural Science and co-author of the paper, discovered the fossil in the Owl Creek Formation in northern Mississippi. Phillips described the moment of discovery: "I was excited because I knew it was a dinosaur tooth, and dinosaur fossils are rare discoveries east of the Mississippi River. I called my volunteer, Michael Estes, over to share in the discovery, and he was beside me in seconds. I knew it wasn't a duck-billed dinosaur, and within 30 minutes of having found it, I posted on Facebook that I'd collected some rare plant-eating dinosaur tooth. It was none other than my colleague Lynn Harrell who made the suggestion, within minutes of my post, that it looked like a ceratopsian tooth." Although previously known fragments indicated horned dinosaurs in Maryland and North Carolina, those fossils were of more "primitive" species that likely lived in the area well before it was separated from western North America. "The discovery is shocking because fossils of ceratopsid horned dinosaurs had never been discovered previously from eastern North America. It's certainly the most unique and important vertebrate fossil discovery I've ever made," said Phillips. The ceratopsid tooth, from the lower jaw of the animal, was found in the Owl Creek Formation in northern Mississippi. Although that part of the state was under water at the time, it was fairly close to land. Farke and Phillips speculate that the tooth probably washed out to sea from a horned dinosaur living along the coastline in that area. The fossil is housed at the Mississippi Museum of Natural Sciences.


News Article | May 23, 2017
Site: www.gizmag.com

Scientists know that at one point or another, North America was split down the middle. Not by politics or religion, but by a winding body of water known as the Western Interior Seaway that connected the Gulf of Mexico to the Arctic Ocean and divided the continent into east and west. But when exactly the land on either side connected hasn't been exactly clear. Paleontologists have stumbled upon a very helpful clue in the form of a tooth from a triceratops-like dinosaur, which sheds new light on the movements of these horned beasts and adds new detail to this story of how two became one. Hundreds of miles wide and thousands of miles long, the Western Interior Seaway is thought to have separated North America during much of the Late Cretaceous Period, from roughly 100 million to 66 million years ago. Therefore, the animals that evolved on the each side after its formation stayed there. Large herds of dinosaurs wandered the western shoreline, leaving a bounty of tracks to create what paleontologists today call the Dinosaur Freeway. Among the creatures stuck on the western side of the seaway were the horned dinosaurs, known formally as the ceratopsids. Or so we thought. A single dinosaur tooth discovered on the eastern side by George Phillips, a paleontology curator at the Mississippi Department of Wildlife, Fisheries, and Parks' Museum of Natural Science, suggests otherwise. "The shape of this tooth, with its distinctive split root, is absolutely unique among dinosaurs," said Andrew Farke, a paleontologist at the Raymond M. Alf Museum of Paleontology at The Webb Schools in Claremont. "We only have the one fossil, but it's more than enough to show that an animal very similar to Triceratops – perhaps even Triceratops itself – made it into eastern North America." The researchers say the tooth is between 68 and 66 million years old, indicating that the two halves of the continent became connected before the major global extinction event 66 million years ago. It was discovered in a creek formation in northern Mississippi, which was underwater at the time although fairly close to land. This leads the scientists to speculate that it likely came from a horned dinosaur living along the coastline before the animal washed out to sea. The research is published in the journal PeerJ.


Farke A.A.,Raymond M. Alf Museum of Paleontology | Patel P.P.,The Webb Schools
Cretaceous Research | Year: 2012

An isolated coracoid represents the first described occurrence of an enantiornithine bird from the Kaiparowits Formation (Upper Cretaceous) of southern Utah, USA. The specimen is identified as enantiornithine by the convex scapular facet, approximate alignment of this facet with the humeral articular facet and acrocoracoid process, and the presence of an acrocoracoidal tubercle. This coracoid came from a comparatively large individual, consistent with previous reports of other large enantiornithines from strata of Campanian strata in North America, South America, and Europe. The occurrence of enantiornithines in the Kaiparowits Formation and their apparent absence in the well-sampled Dinosaur Park Formation of similar age in Alberta represents yet another faunal difference between the two areas, although this may be a result of environmental differences rather than the endemism proposed for non-avian dinosaurs. © 2012 Andrew A. Farke and Priyanka P. Patel.


Herrero L.,The Webb Schools | Farke A.A.,Raymond M. Alf Museum of Paleontology
PalArch's Journal of Vertebrate Palaeontology | Year: 2010

Skin impressions from hadrosaurid dinosaurs are relatively common finds throughout the Cretaceous Western Interior of North America. A recently discovered specimen from the late Campanian-aged Kaiparowits Formation of southern Utah is typical for hadrosaurs, with randomly arranged polygonal tubercles averaging around 4 mm in length and 3 mm in width. Based on the associated bones, these impressions likely originated on the thorax of the animal. In contrast with most previously published finds, the skin is not preserved in perfect articulation with the skeleton. This suggests a taphonomic mode in which the skeleton and soft tissues were partially disarticulated prior to burial. © PalArch Foundation.


Farke A.A.,Raymond M. Alf Museum of Paleontology | Wilridge C.A.,The Webb Schools
PalArch's Journal of Vertebrate Palaeontology | Year: 2013

An isolated bone from the late Campanian-aged Kaiparowits Formation of southern Utah is tentatively identified as the terminal wing phalanx (manual phalanx IV-4) from a pterosaur, representing the first report of this clade from the formation. The specimen is 60 mm long and hollow, with thin and delicate walls and expanded ?proximal and ?distal ends. This is consistent with anatomy reported for equivalent elements in pterodactyloid pterosaurs. Although the specimen cannot be more precisely identified, it is consistent with occurrences of pterosaurs in penecontemporaneous terrestrial depositional environments throughout western North America. © PalArch Foundation.


Farke A.A.,Raymond M. Alf Museum of Paleontology | Chok D.J.,The Webb Schools | Herrero A.,The Webb Schools | Scolieri B.,The Webb Schools | Werning S.,University of California at Berkeley
PeerJ | Year: 2013

The tube-crested hadrosaurid dinosaur Parasaurolophus is remarkable for its unusual cranial ornamentation, but little is known about its growth and development, particularly relative to well-documented ontogenetic series for lambeosaurin hadrosaurids (such as Corythosaurus, Lambeosaurus, and Hypacrosaurus). The skull and skeleton of a juvenile Parasaurolophus from the late Campanian-aged (~75.5 Ma) Kaiparowits Formation of southern Utah, USA, represents the smallest and most complete specimen yet described for this taxon. The individual was approximately 2.5 m in body length (~25% maximum adult body length) at death, with a skull measuring 246 mm long and a femur 329 mm long. A histological section of the tibia shows well-vascularized, woven and parallel-fibered primary cortical bone typical of juvenile ornithopods. The histological section revealed no lines of arrested growth or annuli, suggesting the animal may have still been in its first year at the time of death. Impressions of the upper rhamphotheca are preserved in association with the skull, showing that the soft tissue component for the beak extended for some distance beyond the limits of the oral margin of the premaxilla. In marked contrast with the lengthy tube-like crest in adult Parasaurolophus, the crest of the juvenile specimen is low and hemicircular in profile, with an open premaxilla-nasal fontanelle. Unlike juvenile lambeosaurins, the nasal passages occupy nearly the entirety of the crest in juvenile Parasaurolophus. Furthermore, Parasaurolophus initiated development of the crest at less than 25% maximum skull size, contrasting with 50% of maximum skull size in hadrosaurs such as Corythosaurus. This early development may correspond with the larger and more derived form of the crest in Parasaurolophus, as well as the close relationship between the crest and the respiratory system. In general, ornithischian dinosaurs formed bony cranial ornamentation at a relatively younger age and smaller size than seen in extant birds. This may reflect, at least in part, that ornithischians probably reached sexual maturity prior to somatic maturity, whereas birds become reproductively mature after reaching adult size. © 2013 Farke et al.

Loading The Webb Schools collaborators
Loading The Webb Schools collaborators