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News Article | May 17, 2017
Site: www.prnewswire.com

Since 2011, Mr. Swindall has served as the Vice President of Sector Strategy Development with the Wisconsin Economic Development Corporation (WEDC). A division leader at WEDC, Mr. Swindall led a wide-array of sponsored programs to aid and promote state economic development. He and his team worked closely with public entities, private industry, and a host of nonprofit organizations to ensure agency resources were allocated effectively to positively impact communities throughout the area. He also served as an administrator for the Targeted Industry Projects portfolio, a fund designed to spur growth and advance economic progress. Mr. Swindall has been a member of the Board of Directors of The Water Council in Milwaukee, WI, a group founded to align water related industries with the area's freshwater research community.  "I've always been passionate about the success of our region," he stated.  "And as an avid hiker and lover of the outdoors, I've long admired the majesty of the Great Lakes and respected their contribution to our environment. I'm looking forward to collaborating with the exceptional team at GLPF to ensure that the Great Lakes continue to thrive, through innovative grants that will preserve this resource for generations to come. I am grateful for the opportunity to be a part of this terrific organization, and I can't wait to get started." Prior to WEDC, Mr. Swindall was the Acting Executive Director of the Wisconsin Manufacturing Extension Partnership (WMEP), where he led WMEP mission initiatives and oversaw daily operations. Previously, Mr. Swindall was the Principal and Vice President of Marketing and Client Relations for the global consulting firm Argea, Inc.  Early in his career, he worked for a wide range of international financial institutions, including Thomas McKinnon / UBS / Paine Webber, Shearson / Lehman Brothers, Inc., CM&M / Hong Kong Shanghai Bank, and Market Makers Group Amsterdam. "Lee is an exceptional talent and a man of great integrity," noted Debra Shore, Chair of the Board of Directors with GLPF.  "His well-proven leadership skills – and his established record of engaging diverse groups to work together to promote the region's public interest – make him a perfect fit for our organization. He has the right experience to lead GLPF forward, and we're thrilled to welcome him to the organization." Mr. Swindall follows Russell Van Herik, who announced his retirement earlier this year after serving GLPF with distinction for over 20 years.  "Russ had an enormous impact on our organization," added Ms. Shore. "We are grateful to him for his tireless dedication to GLPF, and his countless contributions over the years will forever benefit the Great Lakes region. We thank him, and wish him, the very best." The Governors of seven of the eight Great Lakes states created the Great Lakes Protection Fund in 1989 to help them protect and restore their shared Great Lakes resources. The Fund is the first private endowment created to benefit a specific ecosystem. Since 1989, The Fund has awarded more than $78 million in grants to academic institutions, nonprofit organizations, and private sector partnerships to catalyze the continuous development of new technologies, innovative methods, and practical regional actions to improve the health of the Great Lakes watershed. For more information please visit www.glpf.org. To view the original version on PR Newswire, visit:http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/great-lakes-protection-fund-hires-lee-swindall-as-new-executive-director-300459395.html


MILWAUKEE, May 23, 2017 /PRNewswire/ -- Once again this year, A. O. Smith Corporation and The Water Council are partnering to identify and support entrepreneurs and start-ups developing innovative freshwater technologies through a global technology challenge, BREW Corporate:  Powered by A. O. Smith. The challenge, which was announced this morning during the 2017 Water Leaders Summit in Milwaukee, will focus on three areas of interest to A. O. Smith: To be considered, an entrepreneur or start-up must complete an online application that requests basic information about the business, the problem/issue being addressed, and details regarding the company's stage of technology, core competencies and competitiveness. The deadline for entries is 11:59 p.m. CDT on June 30. All entries will be reviewed by a panel of A. O. Smith personnel, The Water Council senior staff, and subject matter experts in the area of freshwater science.  Recipients will be notified in July; the fall BREW Corporate (Business. Research. Entrepreneurship. In Wisconsin) program begins the week of Sept. 11.  For a complete explanation of A. O. Smith's target technologies, application criteria, and entry forms, go to www.globalwaterport.com/brewcorporate. Recipients will receive a minimum investment of $50,000 from A. O. Smith as well as tuition to participate in The Water Council's 12-month accelerator program in Milwaukee.  In addition to the investment, the winning entrepreneurs receive: This is the second year A. O. Smith and The Water Council have sponsored BREW Corporate Technology Challenge.  In 2016, A. O. Smith received approximately 20 proposals from water technology companies around the world. BREW Accelerator, a program of The Water Council, is a world-class seed accelerator that unleashes water innovation by funding water technology startups from around the world with commercialization potential. The first-of-its-kind accelerator pairs a unique water-focused startup community with credible resources of the World Water Hub to help entrepreneurs accelerate results. Now in its fifth year, BREW has sponsored a total of 25 water technology companies. An expansion of the BREW Accelerator program, BREW Corporate partners with global corporations looking for new technologies to solve a specific challenge. A. O. Smith Corporation, with headquarters in Milwaukee, Wis., is a global leader applying innovative technology and energy-efficient solutions to products manufactured and marketed worldwide.  The company is one of the world's leading manufacturers of residential and commercial water heating equipment and boilers, as well as a leading manufacturer of water treatment products. For more information, visit www.aosmith.com. The Water Council was established as a 501(c)(3) organization in 2009 by Milwaukee-area businesses, education and government leaders. With a mission of aligning the regional freshwater research community with water-related industries, the organization takes great pride in having created the leading water technology cluster in the United States and one of the most powerful in the world. Headquartered in the Global Water Center in Milwaukee, Wis., The Water Council links global water technology companies, innovative water entrepreneurs, government agencies, non-governmental organizations, acclaimed academic research programs and some of the nation's brightest and most energetic water professionals. The driving force behind this success is the spirit of collaboration between public, private and academic sectors and the shared commitment to finding innovative solutions to critical global water issues.


To be considered, an entrepreneur or start-up must complete an online application that requests basic information about the business, the problem/issue being addressed, and details regarding the company's stage of technology, core competencies and competitiveness. The deadline for entries is 11:59 p.m. CDT on June 30. All entries will be reviewed by a panel of A. O. Smith personnel, The Water Council senior staff, and subject matter experts in the area of freshwater science.  Recipients will be notified in July; the fall BREW Corporate (Business. Research. Entrepreneurship. In Wisconsin) program begins the week of Sept. 11.  For a complete explanation of A. O. Smith's target technologies, application criteria, and entry forms, go to www.globalwaterport.com/brewcorporate. Recipients will receive a minimum investment of $50,000 from A. O. Smith as well as tuition to participate in The Water Council's 12-month accelerator program in Milwaukee.  In addition to the investment, the winning entrepreneurs receive: This is the second year A. O. Smith and The Water Council have sponsored BREW Corporate Technology Challenge.  In 2016, A. O. Smith received approximately 20 proposals from water technology companies around the world. BREW Accelerator, a program of The Water Council, is a world-class seed accelerator that unleashes water innovation by funding water technology startups from around the world with commercialization potential. The first-of-its-kind accelerator pairs a unique water-focused startup community with credible resources of the World Water Hub to help entrepreneurs accelerate results. Now in its fifth year, BREW has sponsored a total of 25 water technology companies. An expansion of the BREW Accelerator program, BREW Corporate partners with global corporations looking for new technologies to solve a specific challenge. A. O. Smith Corporation, with headquarters in Milwaukee, Wis., is a global leader applying innovative technology and energy-efficient solutions to products manufactured and marketed worldwide.  The company is one of the world's leading manufacturers of residential and commercial water heating equipment and boilers, as well as a leading manufacturer of water treatment products. For more information, visit www.aosmith.com. The Water Council was established as a 501(c)(3) organization in 2009 by Milwaukee-area businesses, education and government leaders. With a mission of aligning the regional freshwater research community with water-related industries, the organization takes great pride in having created the leading water technology cluster in the United States and one of the most powerful in the world. Headquartered in the Global Water Center in Milwaukee, Wis., The Water Council links global water technology companies, innovative water entrepreneurs, government agencies, non-governmental organizations, acclaimed academic research programs and some of the nation's brightest and most energetic water professionals. The driving force behind this success is the spirit of collaboration between public, private and academic sectors and the shared commitment to finding innovative solutions to critical global water issues.


To be considered, an entrepreneur or start-up must complete an online application that requests basic information about the business, the problem/issue being addressed, and details regarding the company's stage of technology, core competencies and competitiveness. The deadline for entries is 11:59 p.m. CDT on June 30. All entries will be reviewed by a panel of A. O. Smith personnel, The Water Council senior staff, and subject matter experts in the area of freshwater science.  Recipients will be notified in July; the fall BREW Corporate (Business. Research. Entrepreneurship. In Wisconsin) program begins the week of Sept. 11.  For a complete explanation of A. O. Smith's target technologies, application criteria, and entry forms, go to www.globalwaterport.com/brewcorporate. Recipients will receive a minimum investment of $50,000 from A. O. Smith as well as tuition to participate in The Water Council's 12-month accelerator program in Milwaukee.  In addition to the investment, the winning entrepreneurs receive: This is the second year A. O. Smith and The Water Council have sponsored BREW Corporate Technology Challenge.  In 2016, A. O. Smith received approximately 20 proposals from water technology companies around the world. BREW Accelerator, a program of The Water Council, is a world-class seed accelerator that unleashes water innovation by funding water technology startups from around the world with commercialization potential. The first-of-its-kind accelerator pairs a unique water-focused startup community with credible resources of the World Water Hub to help entrepreneurs accelerate results. Now in its fifth year, BREW has sponsored a total of 25 water technology companies. An expansion of the BREW Accelerator program, BREW Corporate partners with global corporations looking for new technologies to solve a specific challenge. A. O. Smith Corporation, with headquarters in Milwaukee, Wis., is a global leader applying innovative technology and energy-efficient solutions to products manufactured and marketed worldwide.  The company is one of the world's leading manufacturers of residential and commercial water heating equipment and boilers, as well as a leading manufacturer of water treatment products. For more information, visit www.aosmith.com. The Water Council was established as a 501(c)(3) organization in 2009 by Milwaukee-area businesses, education and government leaders. With a mission of aligning the regional freshwater research community with water-related industries, the organization takes great pride in having created the leading water technology cluster in the United States and one of the most powerful in the world. Headquartered in the Global Water Center in Milwaukee, Wis., The Water Council links global water technology companies, innovative water entrepreneurs, government agencies, non-governmental organizations, acclaimed academic research programs and some of the nation's brightest and most energetic water professionals. The driving force behind this success is the spirit of collaboration between public, private and academic sectors and the shared commitment to finding innovative solutions to critical global water issues. To view the original version on PR Newswire, visit:http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/a-o-smith-the-water-council-partner-again-to-sponsor-2017-brew-corporate-technology-challenge-300461725.html


Giordano R.,The Water Council | Liersch S.,Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research
Environmental Modelling and Software | Year: 2012

The increasing awareness of the complexity and uncertainty of environmental processes is changing the role of information production to support decision-making. Monitoring systems need to gather reliable information, adopting a multi-scale and integrated approach. Using exclusively technical monitoring methods to collect the information could result in unsustainable monitoring costs. In order to minimize the costs and to address the scale issue, the integration of local and technical knowledge is proposed in this work. For the implementation of this approach, a tool based on the use of fuzzy logic and geographic information system (GIS) technologies was developed. The willingness of the local community to participate in monitoring activities was ensured by keeping these activities as simple and close to local knowledge as possible. The fuzzy GIS-based system enhances both the comprehensibility of the local knowledge for the decision-makers and its reliability, making it usable for the decision-making process. The tool was developed to support soil salinity monitoring in the lower Amudarya River Basin in Uzbekistan. © 2011 Elsevier Ltd.


Ritz S.P.,University of Bern | Stocker T.F.,University of Bern | Grimalt J.O.,The Water Council | Menviel L.,University of Sydney | Timmermann A.,University of Hawaii at Manoa
Nature Geoscience | Year: 2013

The Atlantic meridional overturning circulation affects the latitudinal distribution of heat, and is a key component of the climate system. Proxy reconstructions, based on sedimentary 231Pa/230Th ratios and the difference between surface- and deep-water radiocarbon ages, indicate that during the last glacial period, the overturning circulation was reduced during millennial-scale periods of cooling1-5. However, much debate exists over the robustness of these proxies6-8. Here we combine proxy reconstructions of sea surface and air temperatures and a global climate model to quantitatively estimate changes in the strength of the Atlantic meridional overturning circulation during the last glacial period. We find that, relative to the Last Glacial Maximum, the overturning circulation was reduced by approximately 14 Sv during the cold Heinrich event 1. During the Younger Dryas cold event, the overturning circulation was reduced by approximately 12 Sv, relative to the preceding warm interval. These changes are consistent with qualitative estimates of the overturning circulation from sedimentary 231Pa/230Th ratios. In addition, we find that the strength of the overturning circulation during the Last Glacial Maximum and the Holocene epoch are indistinguishable within the uncertainty of the reconstruction. Copyright © 2013 Macmillan Publishers Limited.


De Girolamo A.M.,The Water Council | Lo Porto A.,The Water Council
Land Use Policy | Year: 2012

The Rio Mannu River Basin (Sardinia, Italy) is undergoing a process of agricultural intensification. Like many Mediterranean areas, this basin is characterized by water shortages and diffuse pollution from agricultural sources. Hence the objective of this study was to develop possible land use and land management scenarios that could constitute an alternative to the current watershed management. Several land use and land management scenarios were formulated and analyzed with local stakeholders, and two were selected and simulated as realistic in consideration of the socio-economical aspects of the study area. Scenario 1 involves agricultural practices that include a reduction in fertilizer use to meet the Water Framework Directive requirements for " good" status of water bodies. Scenario 2 introduces rapeseed cultivation, replacing durum wheat in a small area, to investigate the impact of biofuel plant cultivation on water quality. Each option was assessed by considering the effects on water quality, crop yields and economic benefits. The Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) model was applied to simulate hydrological processes and evaluate current and future nutrient loads. This model requires adequate streamflow data for calibration and validation. However, as is the case for many Mediterranean basins, insufficient data were available. Therefore, a methodology was developed and tested to calibrate hydrological processes based on the transposition of a parameter set from a gauged catchment located in the same region. This study suggests that a sound use of fertilizers could substantially reduce the amount of nutrients flowing into surface waters, although the effects of such a policy on crop yield and farm income would be negative in some cases. Moreover, the results clearly predict that the replacement of durum wheat with rapeseed (a biofuel crop), could offer a margin of profit, but would have a negative impact on water quality due to increased nutrient losses. Consequently, this option is unsuitable for this area. Furthermore, it can be inferred from these results that the promotion of the use of energy from renewable sources may have a negative impact on the objectives of the EU Water Framework Directive. Clearly, this process needs to be regulated, taking into account environmental and socio-economical aspects. © 2011 Elsevier Ltd.


Trade in energy products and services and investments in the energy sector are central to energy security. Despite the rhetoric of energy independence, the world's leading economies inhabit a complex world of energy flows and institutions that seek to govern them. This article asks: how is energy governed by international trade and investment institutions and agreements; and how would it be governed by these institutions depending on alternative governance preferences? Drawing on recent developments, it outlines three sets of tensions - between emerging multipolarity and existing regimes, between states and markets, and a structural imperative between energy and climate - that are shaping the context for energy governance. The article then analyses, from the perspective of energy exporters, importers and firms, how the landscape of multilateral, plurilateral and regional agreements manages these challenges. The current institutional configuration reveals partially overlapping memberships, incoherent rules governing state-driven policies and market-led interventions, and inconsistent rules between energy and environmental concerns. In pursuit of coherence in this complex milieu, the article ends by outlining a schematic framework for institutional design. The design choices depend on countries' preferences for greater or lesser consistency in rules and on more integrated versus fragmented governance across institutions. © 2011 London School of Economics and Political Science and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.


Climate change and rainfall variability poses serious risks to rainfed farming communities in the semi-dry agro-ecological zones of Zimbabwe. Its impacts include erratic and unpredictable seasonal rainfall, floods and cyclones. These impacts are more magnified in marginal rainfed agricultural areas characterized by low and erratic precipitation leading to low and unpredictable levels of crop production. Adaptation to these impacts is increasingly being advocated as a more sustainable response that enhances livelihoods. Through an examination of key debates from climate-science scholars, this paper examines the social research and action priorities that can be pursued in order to build the resilience of rural communities who rely on rainfed agriculture for their livelihoods. The paper examines the nature of adaptation processes and subsequently identifies research themes, action priorities and approaches that can generate more robust responses to climate change at various levels. The study found out that despite the weaknesses identified in Zimbabwean water and agricultural policies, there are a number of specific actions that researchers, policy-makers and communities can take to enhance adaptation capacity. Systematic assessment of rural risk and vulnerability and participatory identification of possible solutions can enable the rural poor to get better access to options, assets and the services they require to improve their livelihoods. This also enables the identification and improvement of more adaptation options that the farmers themselves have already been trying out for many years. © 2010 Elsevier Ltd.


Gallego-Ayala J.,The Water Council
Water Policy | Year: 2013

The integrated water resources management (IWRM) paradigm has emerged as the main guiding framework for water resources development and management. Since the IWRM approach started to gain prominence with the 1992 Rio de Janeiro Summit and the Dublin Conference, developing and developed countries worldwide have adopted and transposed the tools and principles embodied in this holistic approach into their national policies as well as their regulatory and institutional frameworks. The scientific community has performed extensive studies within the IWRM field. In fact, there is a growing literature analysing multi-dimensional functions to pursue an IWRM approach in water resources management. The main objective of this study is to perform a literature review of the scientific knowledge in the IWRM field published between the years 2000 and 2011. A total of 353 papers published in scientific journals were carefully reviewed and extracted from the ISI Web of Science database. The main results show that: (a) the dominant research topics in IWRManalysis focus on its institutional framework, on equitable water allocation (sustainable management of water resources), and on IWRM implementation and stakeholder participation; and (b) the leading countries in scientific research into IWRM are Germany, the USA and South Africa. ©IWA Publishing 2013.

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