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News Article | February 15, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

The Community for Accredited Online Schools, a leading resource provider for higher education information, has released its list of the Best Online Colleges in Texas for 2017. Highlighting both two- and four-year schools, more than 90 Texas colleges received accolades, with the University of Texas at Austin, Texas A&M University, University of North Texas, Texas Tech University and Baylor University coming in as the top four-year schools and St. Philip’s College, Odessa College, Del Mar College, Western Texas College and Texas State Technical College Waco ranking highest among two-year schools. “About 1.5 million students enrolled in post-secondary education in Texas in fall 2016,” said Doug Jones, CEO and founder of AccreditedSchoolsOnline.org. “As Internet-based coursework becomes more accessible, students may find that online programs suit their needs better. Schools on our list have been ranked for overall quality, providing excellent options for anyone who wants more flexible education options.” To determine the Best Online Schools in Texas, each college in the state was evaluated using over a dozen unique data points to find which schools best meet students’ needs, including graduation rates, career placement services and financial aid availability. AccreditedSchoolsOnline.org also requires each school highlighted on the lists to carry institutional accreditation and hold public or private not-for-profit status. Find each school’s score and ranking or read more about the data and methodology used to determine the lists here: The Best Four-Year Online Schools in Texas for 2017 include the following: Abilene Christian University Angelo State University Baylor University Concordia University-Texas Dallas Baptist University Dallas Christian College Grace School of Theology Houston Baptist University Howard Payne University Lamar University LeTourneau University Lubbock Christian University Messenger College Midwestern State University Our Lady of the Lake University Prairie View A & M University Sam Houston State University Schreiner University Southern Methodist University Southwestern Adventist University Southwestern Assemblies of God University St Mary's University Stephen F Austin State University Sul Ross State University Tarleton State University Texas A & M International University Texas A & M University-College Station Texas A & M University-Commerce Texas A & M University-Corpus Christi Texas A & M University-Kingsville Texas A & M University-Texarkana Texas Christian University Texas Southern University Texas State University Texas Tech University Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center Texas Woman's University The University of Texas at Arlington The University of Texas at Austin The University of Texas at Dallas The University of Texas at El Paso The University of Texas at Tyler The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston The University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio The University of Texas of the Permian Basin The University of Texas Rio Grande Valley Trinity University University of Dallas University of Houston University of Houston-Clear Lake The Best Two-Year Online Schools in Texas for 2017 include the following: Alvin Community College Amarillo College Austin Community College District Central Texas College College of the Mainland Collin College Del Mar College El Paso Community College Frank Phillips College Grayson College Houston Community College Kilgore College Lamar Institute of Technology Lamar State College-Port Arthur Lone Star College Navarro College North Central Texas College Northwest Vista College Odessa College Palo Alto College Panola College San Antonio College South Plains College St Philip's College Tarrant County College District Temple College Texas State Technical College - West Texas Texas State Technical College-Waco Trinity Valley Community College Tyler Junior College Western Texas College ### About Us: AccreditedSchoolsOnline.org was founded in 2011 to provide students and parents with quality data and information about pursuing an affordable, quality education that has been certified by an accrediting agency. Our community resource materials and tools span topics such as college accreditation, financial aid, opportunities available to veterans, people with disabilities, as well as online learning resources. We feature higher education institutions that have developed online learning programs that include highly trained faculty, new technology and resources, and online support services to help students achieve educational success. environments that include highly trained faculty, new technology and resources, and online support services to help students achieve educational and career success.


News Article | February 28, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

A University of Texas at Arlington College of Education researcher shows in a new study that race and sex still matter when public school teachers seek to become principals. Bradley Davis, UTA assistant professor of educational leadership and policy studies, published Pathways to the Principalship: An Event History Analysis of the Careers of Teachers With Principal Certification in the American Educational Research Journal. Davis' co-authors included Mark Gooden, UT Austin professor, and director of Principalship Program and PSEL Coordinator; and Alex Bowers, associate professor of Educational Leadership at Teachers College, Columbia University. "We found that five to seven years after certification is when teachers are most likely to become principals," Davis said. "We found that for white men, that move happens sooner and is more likely than for women or men of a different race or ethnicity. We view this as evidence of systemic bias in principal selection." Researchers used data on nearly 11,000 educators over 17 academic years in a highly diverse context. The study examined the career paths of teachers to determine whether and when they transition into principalship. The study incorporates a variety of event history analyses to determine how an individual's race, gender and their combination contribute to those individuals' likelihood of making the career transition. The researchers found that even when controlling for personal characteristics and measures of professional experience, there were inequitable pathways to the principalship constructed around race and sex. "Where that bias originates is beyond the scope of this particular paper but if you ask me, it often comes down to who school boards and district leaders are more comfortable with," Davis said. "Comfort is a subjective measure and often results in power holders hiring or promoting folks who look and act like themselves." Teresa Taber Doughty, dean of the College of Education, said Davis' study illustrates a systemic challenge in the education sector. "The study certainly gives a voice to the underrepresented," Doughty said. "The study shows serious racial, ethnic and gender inequities." Davis said new research this semester will look at whether or not these gaps in opportunity have narrowed over time. The University of Texas at Arlington is a Carnegie Research-1 "highest research activity" institution. With a projected global enrollment of close to 57,000, UTA is one of the largest institutions in the state of Texas. Guided by its Strategic Plan 2020 Bold Solutions|Global Impact, UTA fosters interdisciplinary research and education within four broad themes: health and the human condition, sustainable urban communities, global environmental impact, and data-driven discovery. UTA was recently cited by U.S. News & World Report as having the second lowest average student debt among U.S. universities. U.S. News & World Report lists UTA as having the fifth highest undergraduate diversity index among national universities. The University is a Hispanic-Serving Institution and is ranked as the top four-year college in Texas for veterans on Military Times' 2017 Best for Vets list.


News Article | March 1, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

Sometimes good things come to those who wait. Two faculty advisers - Engineering Professors Panos Shiakolas and Pranesh Aswath - supervised a student team, led by Letia Blanco, about five years ago in designing and building a smart bandage, which allowed more efficient healing of wounds and delivery of multiple drugs on their own time schedules to the wound, she wasn't sure what would become of it. That design team now has a patent on their invention, which is titled, Controlled Release Nanoparticulate Matter Delivery System. "Our goal was to protect the wound and increase infection control," said Blanco, who is a lead engineer at Raytheon, after graduating from UTA with a degree in Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering. "Raytheon teamed up with UTA to secure the patent. It's very exciting." Blanco led the team that senior year in 2010. Also on the team were: Christopher Alberts, Kyle Godfrey, Andrew Patin and Chris Grace, all Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering graduates; Panos Shiakolas, UTA associate professor in the Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering Department; and Pranesh Aswath, UTA professor in the Materials Science and Engineering Department and vice provost for academic planning and policy. In addition, the team presented its findings through a refereed conference paper at the 2012 American Society of Mechanical Engineers Winter Annual Meeting conference and at a 2011 Biomedical Engineering Conference. More than half a million people in the United States seek medical treatment for burns every year and 40,000 of those have injuries severe enough to require hospitalization. In addition to the millions who suffer from burns, Blanco said the project appealed to the team because it had the ability to help soldiers in the field. "Many times, soldiers' dressings would have to be applied over and over again because health care providers would have to apply medicine," Blanco said. "Every time they had to do that, they had to undress and redress the wound. That process of changing the dressings was more dangerous than the technology we designed and developed." The device the student team designed increases the amount of time between dressing changes in two ways. First, a hydrogel is used to control the wound's temperature and that enables better, controlled drug delivery. Second, the device consists of many separate modules, which are connected by a flexible plastic allowing the bandage to comfortably conform to any wound. A lateral wiring scheme allows for bandage size customizing. Removable medicine trays allow used hydrogel to be removed and the electrical components sterilized, then recharged and reused. The team showed in its research that the device could be a profitable product that would reduce infections, ease patient discomfort, shorten hospital stays, lower medical costs and save lives. Just for the record, this is Patent No. 9,522,241 and was issued on Dec. 20, 2016. The entry also won the only award given out in 2011for the prestigious American Society for Materials International Undergraduate Design Competition. In addition, the students presented the findings at a 2012 ASME conference. Aswath, one of the senior design project's advisers, said the project shows the value of undergraduate research. "This is just one example of outstanding work done by our undergraduate students who can compete at the highest level and win competitions and get patents awarded," Aswath said. "They are all now successful in their careers and we are still in touch with the lead of the team, Letia Blanco, who is a rising star at Raytheon." Aswath said the patent embodies UTA's theme of health and the human condition within the University's Strategic Plan Bold Solutions | Global Impact. Shiakolas said the University is working with Blanco and Raytheon to look at future steps of commercializing the product. About The University of Texas at Arlington The University of Texas at Arlington is a Carnegie Research-1 "highest research activity" institution. With a projected global enrollment of close to 57,000, UTA is one of the largest institutions in the state of Texas. Guided by its Strategic Plan 2020 Bold Solutions|Global Impact, UTA fosters interdisciplinary research and education within four broad themes: health and the human condition, sustainable urban communities, global environmental impact, and data-driven discovery. UTA was recently cited by U.S. News & World Report as having the second lowest average student debt among U.S. universities. U.S. News & World Report ranks UTA fifth in the nation for undergraduate diversity. The University is a Hispanic-Serving Institution and is ranked as the top four-year college in Texas for veterans on Military Times' 2017 Best for Vets list.


News Article | February 15, 2017
Site: www.marketwired.com

CITY OF INDUSTRY, CA--(Marketwired - Feb 14, 2017) - Marina Biotech, Inc. ( : MRNA), a biopharmaceutical company focused on the development and commercialization of innovative therapeutics for disease intersections of arthritis, hypertension and cancer, today announced the appointment of Larn Hwang, Ph.D. as Chief Scientific Officer and Mihir Munsif as Chief Operating Officer. "We are thrilled to have Larn and Mihir join the Marina Biotech team," stated Joseph W. Ramelli, CEO of Marina Biotech. "Each of them brings a track record of success and important skill sets that I believe will prove invaluable for Marina at this important inflection point in the company's history. Larn will bring with her extensive experience in oligo-therapeutics and Mihir will lead the manufacturing of our drug products." Dr. Hwang has served as the Chief Executive Officer of Oncotelic, Inc. since October 2015 and as the Chief Scientific Officer of Autotelic Inc. since October 2013. Dr. Hwang is a veteran in the drug development industry, with broad expertise in drug discovery and biomarker development, as well as clinical and regulatory operations. Dr. Hwang was a founder of IgDraSol, Inc. (which merged with Sorrento Therapeutics in 2013, where she later served as VP of Regulatory and Clinical Operations from September 2013 to May 2014) and served as its Chief Operating Officer from April 2012 to August 2013, and she was a founder of Biomiga Diagnostics and served as its Chief Operating Officer from 2011 to August 2013. Prior to that, she served as Head of Cell Biology at Abraxis BioScience from November 2005 to June 2011 and as Senior Principal Scientist at Celgene Corporation from February 2011 to June 2011. Dr. Hwang made significant contributions to the field of antisense and miRNA with several patents applications filed on her work. Dr. Hwang has also held positions with Johnson & Johnson and ABI. Dr. Hwang received a Ph.D. in Molecular Microbiology from The University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center at Dallas. Mr. Munsif has served as the Senior Vice President at Autotelic Inc. since November 2016, as the Senior Vice President of Portfolio Management of LipoMedics, Inc. since June 2016 and as the Senior Vice President of Portfolio Management of Oncotelic, Inc. since October 2015. Previously he served as the Chief Executive Officer of IthenaPharma Inc. from August 2016 until its merger with Marina Biotech in 2016, and as the Chief Operating Officer of IthenaPharma Inc. from September 2014 until August 2016. Prior to that, he served as Product Life Cycle Management and Supply Chain Consulting at Accenture from March 2013 until September 2014 and as Product Life Cycle Management and Supply Chain Management Operations at Herbalife from April 2009 until March 2013. Mr. Munsif received a M.S. in Industrial Engineering from the University of Oklahoma and a B.S. in Chemical Engineering from Manipal Institute of Technology. About Marina Biotech, Inc. Marina Biotech is a biotechnology company focused on the development and commercialization of innovative therapeutics for disease intersections of arthritis, hypertension, and cancer. Our pipeline includes combination therapies of oligonucleotide-based therapeutics and small molecules. The Marina Biotech pipeline currently includes a clinical program in Familial Adenomatous Polyposis (a precancerous syndrome). By its merger with IthenaPharma, Marina Biotech recently acquired IT-102/IT-103 -- next generation celecoxib -- which will be developed together with CEQ508 as a therapeutic enhancer for therapies against FAP and CRC. IT-102/IT-103 are also being developed for the treatment of combined arthritis/ hypertension and treatment of pain requiring high dose of celecoxib. Additional information about Marina Biotech is available at http://www.marinabio.com. Marina Biotech Forward-Looking Statements Statements made in this news release may be forward-looking statements within the meaning of Federal Securities laws that are subject to certain risks and uncertainties and involve factors that may cause actual results to differ materially from those projected or suggested. Factors that could cause actual results to differ materially from those in forward-looking statements include, but are not limited to: (i) the ability of Marina Biotech to successfully integrate its business operations with those of IthenaPharma; (ii) the ability of Marina Biotech to obtain funding to support its clinical development; (iii) the ability of Marina Biotech to attract and/or maintain manufacturing, research, development and commercialization partners; (iv) the ability of Marina Biotech and/or a partner to successfully complete product research and development, including preclinical and clinical studies and commercialization; (v) the ability of Marina Biotech and/or a partner to obtain required governmental approvals; and (vi) the ability of Marina Biotech and/or a partner to develop and commercialize products prior to, and that can compete favorably with those of, competitors. Additional factors that could cause actual results to differ materially from those projected or suggested in any forward-looking statements are contained in Marina Biotech's most recent filings with the Securities and Exchange Commission. Marina Biotech assumes no obligation to update or supplement forward-looking statements because of subsequent events.


News Article | February 15, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

One of Austin’s top rated doctors, Christopher Seeker, MD, announced today the opening of a state-of-the-art medical aesthetics practice. The opening of SEEKER Professional Aesthetics (S.P.A.) represents the collaboration and partnership with his longtime nurse practitioner at Austin Area OB-GYN & Fertility, Casey Friesenhahn, WHCNP. While still maintaining the core OB-GYN practice, together they will oversee all aspects of S.P.A. services so they adhere to the same rigorous standards that have made Austin Area OB-GYN & Fertility Austin’s most trusted and recognized women’s medical services group. According to Dr. Seeker, “We did not take on this effort lightly. We did a lot of research to select the best laser technology, the most recent innovations, and the most comprehensive training in order to provide our patients with a complete suite of the most effective and safest medical aesthetics options available.“ Added Seeker, “We would not have made the investment [in S.P.A] if we did not think we could bring exciting novelty to the field of medical aesthetics for our patients.” The new SEEKER Professional Aesthetics (S.P.A), located within AA OB-GYN & Fertility offices at St. David’s Women’s Center of Texas, is a full-service medical aesthetics practice open to the public, not just patients of Austin Area OB-GYN & Fertility. Services available at S.P.A include: Laser Treatments, Photo Facials, Chemical Peels, Injectables and Laser Hair Removal. In addition to this comprehensive suite of aesthetic services, S.P.A. will also offer MonaLisa Touch® laser therapy for vaginal health and SculpSure®, a revolutionary, non-invasive body contouring treatment. S.P.A. features three private treatment rooms with a dedicated staff trained in the latest procedures. Visit online at seekerspa.com or call 512.533.4137 to schedule an appointment with the experts. SEEKER Professional Aesthetics is open M-F from 9am – 5:00pm and is located at St. David’s Women’s Center of Texas at 12200 Renfert Way, Suite 100. About SEEKER Professional Aesthetics SEEKER Professional Aesthetics is a premium one-stop shop for women’s health, beauty and wellness founded by namesake Christopher Seeker, MD. The original inspiration for S.P.A. resulted from the trusted partnership with Seeker’s long-standing nurse practitioner, Casey Friesenhahn, WHCNP. Casey noticed over the years that more and more of their patients sought their advice on how to counteract the impacts of aging without surgical or other risky invasive methods. Because of this trusted relationship with their patients, SEEKER Professional Aesthetics was born. About Christopher Seeker, MD. Dr. Seeker has been with Austin Area OB-GYN & Fertility since 1988. He obtained his doctor of medicine from The University of Texas Health & Science Center in San Antonio in 1984 where he was a member of Alpha Omega Alpha honorary medical society. He is board certified by the American Board of Obstetrics and Gynecology and is a member of the Texas Medical Association, Travis County Medical Association and American Society of Reproductive Medicine. Seeker is one of Central Texas’ most recognized and awarded physicians. Beyond his loyal patient following, Seeker consistently ranks among top doctors in popular annual listings, including Texas Monthly, Austin American Statesman, Austin Fit Magazine, and more. About Casey Friesenhahn, WHCNP Casey Friesenhahn, WHCNP, has been an integral partner and key member of Dr. Seeker’s medical practice for almost 18 years. In addition to her degree as a Women’s Health Care Nurse Practitioner (WHCNP) from University of Texas Southwestern Medical School in Dallas and her Bachelor of Science in Nursing from the University of Texas, Casey is certified as a Botox and filler injector. She is also trained and certified to perform the MonaLisa® procedure, laser hair removal, scar and leg vein reduction, photo facials and non-ablative laser therapy.


News Article | February 16, 2017
Site: phys.org

A new, supercomputing-powered, real-time analysis system may change that. Researchers from the Texas Advanced Computing Center (TACC), The University of Texas Health Science Center (UTHSC) and Philips Healthcare, have developed a new, automated platform capable of returning in-depth analyses of MRI scans in minutes, thereby minimizing patient callbacks, saving millions of dollars annually, and advancing precision medicine. The team presented a proof-of-concept demonstration of the platform at the International Conference on Biomedical and Health Informatics this week in Orlando, Florida. The platform they developed combines the imaging capabilities of the Philips MRI scanner with the processing power of the Stampede supercomputer—one of the fastest in the world—using the TACC-developed Agave API Platform infrastructure to facilitate communication, data transfer, and job control between the two. An API, or Application Program Interface, is a set of protocols and tools that specify how software components should interact. Agave manages the execution of the computing jobs and handles the flow of data from site to site. It has been used for a range of problems, from plant genomics to molecular simulations, and allows researchers to access cyberinfrastructure resources like Stampede via the web. "The Agave Platform brings the power of high-performance computing into the clinic," said William (Joe) Allen, a life science researcher for TACC and lead author on the paper. "This gives radiologists and other clinical staff the means to provide real-time quality control, precision medicine, and overall better care to the patient." For their demonstration project, staff at UTHSC performed MRI scans on a patient with a cartilage disorder to assess the state of the disease. Data from the MRI was passed through a proxy server to Stampede where it ran the GRAPE (GRAphical Pipelines Environment) analysis tool. Created by researchers at UTHSC, GRAPE characterizes the scanned tissue and returns pertinent information that can be used to do adaptive scanning - essentially telling a clinician to look more closely at a region of interest, thus accelerating the discovery of pathologies. The researchers demonstrated the system's effectiveness using a T1 mapping process, which converts raw data to useful imagery. The transformation involves computationally-intensive data analyses and is therefore a reasonable demonstration of a typical workflow for real-time, quantitative MRI. A full circuit, from MRI scan to supercomputer and back, took approximately five minutes to complete and was accomplished without any additional inputs or interventions. The system is designed to alert the scanner operator to redo a corrupted scan if the patient moves, or initiate additional scans as needed, while adding only minimal time to the overall scanning process. "We are very excited by this fruitful collaboration with TACC," said Refaat Gabr, an assistant professor of Diagnostic and Interventional Imaging at UTHSC and the lead researcher on the project. "By integrating the computational power of TACC, we plan to build a completely adaptive scan environment to study multiple sclerosis and other diseases." Ponnada Narayana, Gabr's co-principal investigator and the director of Magnetic Resonance Research at The University of Texas Medical School at Houston, elaborated. "Another potential of this technology is the extraction of quantitative, information-based texture analysis of MRI," he said. "There are a few thousand textures that can be quantified on MRI. These textures can be combined using appropriate mathematical models for radiomics. Combining radiomics with genetic profiles, referred to as radiogenomics, has the potential to predict outcomes in a number diseases, including cancer, and is a cornerstone of precision medicine." According to Allen, "science as a service" platforms like Agave will enable doctors to capture many kinds of biomedical data in real time and turn them into actionable insights. "Here, we demonstrated this is possible for MRI. But this same idea could be extended to virtually any medical device that gathers patient data," he said. "In a world of big health data and an almost limitless capacity to compute, there is little reason not to leverage high-performance computing resources in the clinic." Explore further: Stampede 2 drives the frontiers of science and engineering forward


Patent
The University Of Texas and Mission Pharmacal Co. | Date: 2011-06-07

Small molecules and their derivatives are described for the treatment and/or prevention of intestinal fluid loss. Also disclosed are methods of using said molecules and their derivatives to treat and/or prevent conditions associated with increased levels of 3,5-adenosine monophosphate. Specific compositions of the invention are also novel.


Grant
Agency: Department of Defense | Branch: Air Force | Program: STTR | Phase: Phase II | Award Amount: 705.40K | Year: 2013

ABSTRACT: The leading errors in computing future positions of satellites in Low Earth Orbit are generally due to inaccuracies in the thermospheric density and the prediction thereof. The use of Dynamic Calibration Atmosphere has reduced these traditional sources of error and variations seen in ballistic coefficients can now be attributed to unmodeled satellite frontal area changes. When the orbit of a satellite needs to be predicted, a value is assumed. The assumed value of the ballistic coefficient will cause the predicted orbit to be in error. Hence, considerable improvement in the quality of orbit prediction can be achieved by reducing that error. The ballistic coefficient for prediction is usually obtained from the estimated value prior to the prediction. Instead of assuming the previous estimated value, an analysis of the time series of a history of the estimated values may reveal some characteristics which then can be used to minimize prediction error. BENEFIT: The Phase II effort will result in a software toolset that will improve ballistic coefficient modeling resulting in enhanced orbit prediction. This is of particular benefit to the conjunction assessment mission, improving warning and risk mitigation timelines and accuracy. The toolset will be made available to satellite owner/operators, commercial foreign entities and the defense community. Additionally, the toolset may be provided as a plug-in for commercial software applications such as STK and FreeFlyer.


Disclosed are surprising discoveries concerning the role of anionic phospholipids and aminophospholipids in tumor vasculature and in viral entry and spread, and compositions and methods for utilizing these findings in the treatment of cancer and viral infections. Also disclosed are advantageous antibody, immunoconjugate and duramycin-based compositions and combinations that bind and inhibit anionic phospholipids and aminophospholipids, for use in the safe and effective treatment of cancer, viral infections and related diseases.


The invention provides a conjugate comprising ethylenedicysteine (EC) conjugated to neomycin.

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