The University of Chicago

Lake of the Woods, United States

The University of Chicago

Lake of the Woods, United States
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HERNDON, Va.--(BUSINESS WIRE)--A student’s ninth-grade “status” is the best indicator of whether or not he or she will graduate. The University of Chicago Consortium on Chicago School Research found that students who are on-track after their freshman year are more than three and one-half times more likely to graduate from high school in four years than students who are off-track. To help engage and motivate students who need help staying on track for graduation, Fuel Education® (FuelEd®) is launching a new, credit recovery curriculum for blended and online learning available this fall. The new FuelEd Credit Recovery Curriculum features a modern design with interactive content, adaptive release technology, growth mindset and social emotional exercises to teach grit, and powerful analytic tools—all available in a mobile and accessible learning environment. The courses are designed for students who need to recover credits in order to graduate, but learned enough to make a complete repetition of the course unnecessary. All courses are broken down into modules, each of which starts with a pre-test to evaluate the student’s existing knowledge. If a student demonstrates mastery during the module’s pre-test, the courses’ adaptive release of content allows the student to advance within the course to where he or she needs to be. For added support and motivation, FuelEd embedded content to teach students about grit and to help them develop a growth mindset and social emotional learning practices. “We believe that ‘at-promise’ students sometimes need additional support to overcome obstacles in their education. With the new credit recovery curriculum, we are pleased to provide our school and district partners rich, interactive content and tools to help them better engage students so they can stay on the path to graduation,” said Gregg Levin, Fuel Education’s General Manager. The new courses also include English Language Learners (ELL) support, including non-linguistic representation of content, audio demonstrations and pre-teaching of key vocabulary in both English and Spanish. The FuelEd Credit Recovery Curriculum can be taught by district teachers or FuelEd’s certified teachers. Its advanced analytic tools include visual dashboards to make it easy for teachers to see how a class is performing as a whole or how individual students are progressing through courses. Teachers can generate personalized reports to drive targeted remediation for individual students or small groups. The new curriculum will be released in phases, beginning with Algebra 1, Algebra 2, Geometry, English 9, English 10, and Spanish 1 in the fall, including updated health and physical education courses. FuelEd offers a total of 19 credit recovery courses. To learn more, click here to watch a video. To view a short demo, click here. Fuel Education® partners with school districts to fuel personalized learning and transform the education experience inside and outside the classroom. The company provides innovative solutions for pre-K through 12th grade that empower districts to implement successful online and blended learning programs. Its open, easy-to-use Personalized Learning Platform, PEAK™, enables teachers to customize courses using their own content, FuelEd courses and titles, third-party content, and open educational resources. Fuel Education serves more than 2,000 school districts, offering one of the industry’s largest catalogs of K–12 digital curriculum, certified instruction, professional development, and educational services. To learn more, visit fueleducation.com and Twitter. ©2017 Fuel Education LLC. All rights reserved. Fuel Education, FuelEd, and Summit are trademarks of Fuel Education LLC or its affiliates. All other trademarks are the property of their respective owners.


News Article | May 2, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

The National Academy of Sciences announced today the election of 84 new members and 21 foreign associates in recognition of their distinguished and continuing achievements in original research. The National Academy of Sciences announced today the election of 84 new members and 21 foreign associates in recognition of their distinguished and continuing achievements in original research. Those elected today bring the total number of active members to 2,290 and the total number of foreign associates to 475. Foreign associates are nonvoting members of the Academy, with citizenship outside the United States. Newly elected members and their affiliations at the time of election are: Bates, Frank S.; Regents Professor, department of chemical engineering and materials science, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis Beilinson, Alexander; David and Mary Winton Green University Professor, department of mathematics, The University of Chicago, Chicago Bell, Stephen P.; investigator, Howard Hughes Medical Institute; and professor of biology, department of biology, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge Bhatia, Sangeeta N.; John J. (1929) and Dorothy Wilson Professor, Institute for Medical Engineering and Science, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge Buzsáki, György; professor, Neuroscience Institute, departments of physiology and neuroscience, New York University Langone Medical Center, New York City Carroll, Dana; distinguished professor, department of biochemistry, University of Utah School of Medicine, Salt Lake City Cohen, Judith G.; Kate Van Nuys Page Professor of Astronomy, department of astronomy, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena Crabtree, Robert H.; Conkey P. Whitehead Professor of Chemistry, department of chemistry, Yale University, New Haven, Conn. Cronan, John E.; professor and head of microbiology, professor of biochemistry, and Microbiology Alumni Professor, department of microbiology, University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign Cummins, Christopher C.; Henry Dreyfus Professor of Chemistry, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge Darensbourg, Marcetta Y.; distinguished professor of chemistry, department of chemistry, Texas A&M University, College Station DeVore, Ronald A.; The Walter E. Koss Professor and distinguished professor, department of mathematics, Texas A&M University, College Station Diamond, Douglas W.; Merton H. Miller Distinguished Service Professor of Finance, The University of Chicago, Chicago Doe, Chris Q.; investigator, Howard Hughes Medical Institute; and professor of biology, Institute of Molecular Biology, University of Oregon, Eugene Duflo, Esther; Co-founder and co-Director of the Abdul Latif Jameel Poverty Action Lab, and Professor of Poverty Alleviation and Development Economics, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge Edwards, Robert Haas; professor of neurology and physiology, University of California, San Francisco Firestone, Mary K.; professor and associate dean of instruction and student affairs, department of environmental science policy and management, University of California, Berkeley Fischhoff, Baruch; Howard Heinz University Professor, department of social and decision sciences and department of engineering and public policy, Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh Ginty, David D.; investigator, Howard Hughes Medical Institute; and Edward R. and Anne G. Lefler Professor of Neurobiology, department of neurobiology, Harvard Medical School, Boston Glass, Christopher K.; professor of cellular and molecular medicine and professor of medicine, University of California, San Diego Goldman, Yale E.; professor, department of physiology, Pennsylvania Muscle Institute, University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine, Philadelphia González, Gabriela; spokesperson, LIGO Scientific Collaboration; and professor, department of physics and astronomy, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge Hagan, John L.; John D. MacArthur Professor of Sociology and Law, department of sociology, Northwestern University, Evanston, Ill. Hatten, Mary E.; Frederick P. Rose Professor, laboratory of developmental neurobiology, The Rockefeller University, New York City Hebard, Arthur F.; distinguished professor of physics, department of physics, University of Florida, Gainesville Jensen, Klavs F.; Warren K. Lewis Professor of Chemical Engineering and professor of materials science and engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge Kahn, Barbara B.; vice chair for research strategy and George R. Minot Professor of Medicine at Harvard Medical School, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston Kinder, Donald R.; Philip E. Converse Collegiate Professor of Political Science and Psychology and research scientist, department of political science, Center for Political Studies, Institute for Social Research, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor Lazar, Mitchell A.; Willard and Rhoda Ware Professor in Diabetes and Metabolic Diseases, and director, Institute for Diabetes, Obesity, and Metabolism, University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine, Philadelphia Locksley, Richard M.; investigator, Howard Hughes Medical Institute; and professor, department of medicine (infectious diseases), and Marion and Herbert Sandler Distinguished Professorship in Asthma Research, University of California, San Francisco Lozano, Guillermina; professor and chair, department of genetics, The University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston Mavalvala, Nergis; Curtis and Kathleen Marble Professor of Astrophysics and associate head, department of physics, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge Moore, Jeffrey Scott; Murchison-Mallory Professor of Chemistry, department of chemistry, University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign Moore, Melissa J.; chief scientific officer, mRNA Research Platform, Moderna Therapeutics, Cambridge, Mass.; and Eleanor Eustis Farrington Chair of Cancer Research Professor, RNA Therapeutics Institute, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester Nunnari, Jodi M.; professor, department of molecular and cellular biology, University of California, Davis O'Farrell, Patrick H.; professor of biochemistry and biophysics, department of biochemistry and biophysics, University of California, San Francisco Ort, Donald R.; research leader and Robert Emerson Professor, USDA/ARS Global Change and Photosynthesis Research Unit, departments of plant biology and crop sciences, University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign Parker, Gary; professor, department of civil and environmental engineering and department of geology, University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign Patapoutian, Ardem; investigator, Howard Hughes Medical Institute; and professor, department of molecular and cellular neuroscience, The Scripps Research Institute, La Jolla, Calif. Pellegrini, Claudio; distinguished professor emeritus, department of physics and astronomy, University of California, Los Angeles Pikaard, Craig, S.; investigator, Howard Hughes Medical Institute and Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation; and distinguished professor of biology and molecular and cellular biochemistry, department of biology, Indiana University, Bloomington Read, Nicholas; Henry Ford II Professor of Physics and professor of applied physics and mathematics, Yale University, New Haven, Conn. Roediger, Henry L.; James S. McDonnell Distinguished and University Professor of Psychology, department of psychology and brain sciences, Washington University, St. Louis Rosenzweig, Amy C.; Weinberg Family Distinguished Professor of Life Sciences, and professor, departments of molecular biosciences and of chemistry, Northwestern University, Evanston, Ill. Seto, Karen C.; professor, Yale School of Forestry and Environmental Studies, New Haven, Conn. Seyfarth, Robert M.; professor of psychology and member of the graduate groups in anthropology and biology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia Sibley, L. David; Alan A. and Edith L. Wolff Distinguished Professor in Molecular Microbiology, department of molecular microbiology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis Spielman, Daniel A.; Henry Ford II Professor of Computer Science and Mathematics, departments of computer science and mathematics, Yale University, New Haven, Conn. Sudan, Madhu; Gordon McKay Professor of Computer Science, John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences, Harvard University, Cambridge, Mass. Tishkoff, Sarah; David and Lyn Silfen University Professor, departments of genetics and biology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia Van Essen, David C.; Alumni Professor of Neurobiology, department of anatomy and neurobiology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis Vidale, John E.; professor, department of earth and space sciences, University of Washington, Seattle Wennberg, Paul O.; R. Stanton Avery Professor of Atmospheric Chemistry and Environmental Science and Engineering, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena Wilson, Rachel I.; Martin Family Professor of Basic Research in the Field of Neurobiology, department of neurobiology, Harvard Medical School, Boston Zachos, James C.; professor, department of earth and planetary sciences, University of California, Santa Cruz, Santa Cruz Newly elected foreign associates, their affiliations at the time of election, and their country of citizenship are: Addadi, Lia; professor and Dorothy and Patrick E. Gorman Chair of Biological Ultrastructure, department of structural science, Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot, Israel (Israel/Italy) Folke, Carl; director and professor, The Beijer Institute of Ecological Economics, Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences, Stockholm, Sweden (Sweden) Freeman, Kenneth C.; Duffield Professor of Astronomy, Mount Stromlo and Siding Spring Observatories, Research School of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Australian National University, Weston Creek (Australia) Lee, Sang Yup; distinguished professor, dean, and director, department of chemical and biomolecular engineering, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejeon, South Korea (South Korea) Levitzki, Alexander; professor of biochemistry, unit of cellular signaling, department of biological chemistry, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Jerusalem (Israel) Peiris, Joseph Sriyal Malik; Tam Wah-Ching Professorship in Medical Science, School of Public Health, The University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam, Hong Kong, People's Republic of China (Sri Lanka) Robinson, Carol Vivien; Dr. Lee's Professor of Chemistry, Physical and Theoretical Chemistry Laboratory, University of Oxford, Oxford, England (United Kingdom) Thesleff, Irma; academician of science, professor, and research director, developmental biology program, Institute of Biotechnology, University of Helsinki, Helsinki (Finland) Underdal, Arild; professor of political science, department of political science, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway (Norway) The National Academy of Sciences is a private, nonprofit institution that was established under a congressional charter signed by President Abraham Lincoln in 1863. It recognizes achievement in science by election to membership, and -- with the National Academy of Engineering and the National Academy of Medicine -- provides science, engineering, and health policy advice to the federal government and other organizations.


News Article | May 2, 2017
Site: globenewswire.com

CHICAGO, May 02, 2017 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- GATX Corporation (NYSE:GATX) today announced that Jennifer McManus has been appointed Director, Investor Relations. In this role, Ms. McManus will be responsible for all aspects of GATX’s shareholder communications. Ms. McManus will succeed Christopher LaHurd, who has been appointed Vice President, Business Development at GATX Rail International. Ms. McManus joined GATX Corporation in 2015 as Director, Accounting Research, Policy & Planning in GATX’s Accounting Department. “We are pleased that Jennifer will be leading our investor relations activities,” said Robert C. Lyons, Executive Vice President and Chief Financial Officer of GATX Corporation. “With strong financial and communication skills, Jennifer is uniquely qualified to assist our stakeholders in understanding GATX’s strategy, strengths, and performance.” Ms. McManus received her Bachelor of Arts in Economics and Master of Accounting from The University of Michigan and her Masters of Business Administration from The University of Chicago Booth School of Business. COMPANY DESCRIPTION GATX Corporation (NYSE:GATX) strives to be recognized as the finest railcar leasing company in the world by its customers, its shareholders, its employees and the communities where it operates. As the leading global railcar lessor, GATX has been providing quality railcars and services to its customers for more than 118 years. GATX has been headquartered in Chicago, Illinois, since its founding in 1898. For more information, please visit the Company's website at www.gatx.com. Investor, corporate, financial, historical financial, and news release information may be found at www.gatx.com.


News Article | May 2, 2017
Site: globenewswire.com

CHICAGO, May 02, 2017 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- GATX Corporation (NYSE:GATX) today announced that Jennifer McManus has been appointed Director, Investor Relations. In this role, Ms. McManus will be responsible for all aspects of GATX’s shareholder communications. Ms. McManus will succeed Christopher LaHurd, who has been appointed Vice President, Business Development at GATX Rail International. Ms. McManus joined GATX Corporation in 2015 as Director, Accounting Research, Policy & Planning in GATX’s Accounting Department. “We are pleased that Jennifer will be leading our investor relations activities,” said Robert C. Lyons, Executive Vice President and Chief Financial Officer of GATX Corporation. “With strong financial and communication skills, Jennifer is uniquely qualified to assist our stakeholders in understanding GATX’s strategy, strengths, and performance.” Ms. McManus received her Bachelor of Arts in Economics and Master of Accounting from The University of Michigan and her Masters of Business Administration from The University of Chicago Booth School of Business. COMPANY DESCRIPTION GATX Corporation (NYSE:GATX) strives to be recognized as the finest railcar leasing company in the world by its customers, its shareholders, its employees and the communities where it operates. As the leading global railcar lessor, GATX has been providing quality railcars and services to its customers for more than 118 years. GATX has been headquartered in Chicago, Illinois, since its founding in 1898. For more information, please visit the Company's website at www.gatx.com. Investor, corporate, financial, historical financial, and news release information may be found at www.gatx.com.


News Article | May 2, 2017
Site: globenewswire.com

CHICAGO, May 02, 2017 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- GATX Corporation (NYSE:GATX) today announced that Jennifer McManus has been appointed Director, Investor Relations. In this role, Ms. McManus will be responsible for all aspects of GATX’s shareholder communications. Ms. McManus will succeed Christopher LaHurd, who has been appointed Vice President, Business Development at GATX Rail International. Ms. McManus joined GATX Corporation in 2015 as Director, Accounting Research, Policy & Planning in GATX’s Accounting Department. “We are pleased that Jennifer will be leading our investor relations activities,” said Robert C. Lyons, Executive Vice President and Chief Financial Officer of GATX Corporation. “With strong financial and communication skills, Jennifer is uniquely qualified to assist our stakeholders in understanding GATX’s strategy, strengths, and performance.” Ms. McManus received her Bachelor of Arts in Economics and Master of Accounting from The University of Michigan and her Masters of Business Administration from The University of Chicago Booth School of Business. COMPANY DESCRIPTION GATX Corporation (NYSE:GATX) strives to be recognized as the finest railcar leasing company in the world by its customers, its shareholders, its employees and the communities where it operates. As the leading global railcar lessor, GATX has been providing quality railcars and services to its customers for more than 118 years. GATX has been headquartered in Chicago, Illinois, since its founding in 1898. For more information, please visit the Company's website at www.gatx.com. Investor, corporate, financial, historical financial, and news release information may be found at www.gatx.com.


News Article | May 25, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has granted authorization for a magnetic device used to treat pediatric esophageal atresia, a birth defect that causes abnormal formation of the esophagus. The Flourish™ Pediatric Esophageal Atresia device was created by University of Chicago Medicine assistant professor of radiology Mario Zaritzky, MD, in collaboration with Cook Medical. Esophageal atresia is a birth defect of the esophagus that affects about 1 in 2,500 to 4,000 births per year. Children with the malformation have a gap in their esophagus that prevents them from properly ingesting food. Surgery has traditionally been the only treatment option to repair the malformation until Zaritzky, a pediatric radiologist at the University of Chicago Medicine Comer Children's Hospital, collaborated with Cook on the development of a minimally invasive, magnet-based approach. The new device uses rare earth magnets that are inserted into the upper and lower ends of an infant's esophagus. The procedure doesn't require any major incisions. Over the course of several days, the magnets gradually stretch both ends of the esophagus. Eventually, the ends of the esophagusconnect to form an intact esophagus. So far, 16 patients have been successfully treated with the device. "The idea was to create a minimally invasive procedure that could possibly be an alternative to surgery in selective pediatric cases," said Zaritzky. "Any procedure that can potentially replace major thoracic surgery with a less invasive method should be considered before deciding to go to the operating room." The Flourish Pediatric Esophageal Atresia Device received a special Humanitarian Use Device designation last week after being reviewed through the FDA's Humanitarian Device Exemption pathway. The designation is used for medical devices that treat or diagnose rare diseases or conditions that affect fewer than 4,000 people in the U.S. each year. "We're very excited that FDA has acknowledged the importance of Flourish as a minimally invasive alternative for pediatric patients with esophageal atresia," said Barry Slowey, president and global business unit leader for Cook Medical's Endoscopy business unit. "This technology has the ability to provide a different approach to treatment for those infants who suffer from this condition, as well as for their parents and families." The FDA's approval means more children born with the malformation will have access to a minimally invasive option and be able to avoid surgery. About the University of Chicago Medicine & Biological Sciences The University of Chicago Medicine, with a history dating back to 1927, is one of the nation's leading academic medical institutions. It comprises the Medical Center, Pritzker School of Medicine and the Biological Sciences Division. Its main Hyde Park campus is home to the Center for Care and Discovery, Bernard Mitchell Hospital, Comer Children's Hospital and the Duchossois Center for Advanced Medicine. It also has a 108,000-square-foot facility in Orland Park as well as affiliations and partnerships that create a regional network of doctors in dozens of Chicago-area communities. UChicago Medicine offers a full range of specialty-care services for adults and children through more than 40 institutes and centers including an NCI-designated Comprehensive Cancer Center. It has 805 licensed beds, nearly 850 attending physicians, about 2,500 nurses and over 1,100 residents and fellows. Harvey-based Ingalls Health joined UChicago Medicine's network in 2016. Visit our research blog at sciencelife.uchospitals.edu and our newsroom at uchospitals.edu/news.


A Chicago-area family with a deep commitment to supporting science and medicine is giving $100 million to establish The Duchossois Family Institute at the University of Chicago Medicine, which seeks to accelerate research and interventions based on how the human immune system, microbiome and genetics interact to maintain health. The gift from The Duchossois Group Inc. Chairman and CEO Craig Duchossois, his wife, Janet Duchossois, and The Duchossois Family Foundation will support development of a "new science of wellness" aimed at preserving health and complementing medicine's traditional focus on disease treatment. Their investment will help build an entrepreneurial infrastructure that stimulates research, data integration, and clinical applications, while educating the next generation of young physicians and students in this new science. By providing resources and research infrastructure, The Duchossois Family Institute: Harnessing the Microbiome and Immunity for Human Health will allow faculty and students to focus on preventing disease by optimizing the body's own defenses and finding new ways to maintain well-being. With the embedded expertise of the university's Polsky Center for Entrepreneurship and Innovation, they will work aggressively to bring breakthroughs to market through partnerships with industry, venture capitalists, government agencies, like-minded philanthropists, and the public. "The Duchossois Family Institute will draw on the creativity and skill of university researchers across many fields in bringing new perspectives to medical science, oriented toward making an impact that greatly benefits human lives," said University of Chicago President Robert J. Zimmer. "We are grateful for the Duchossois family's remarkable level of engagement in establishing this innovative alliance between medical experts and entrepreneurs." The amount is the largest single gift in support of UChicago Medicine and brings the family's lifetime charitable contributions to the academic medical center to $137 million. Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research has donated a total of $118 million since 2006, largely to support cancer research. The Duchossois gift is also the fourth time there has been a single gift of $100 million or more to the University of Chicago. The Thomas L. Pearson and The Pearson Family Members Foundation made a grant of $100 million in 2015 to establish The Pearson Institute for the Study and Resolution of Global Conflicts and The Pearson Global Forum at the Harris School of Public Policy, and an anonymous donor gave $100 million in 2007 to fund the Odyssey Scholarship Program in support of undergraduate student aid. The university's largest gift to date is $300 million in 2008 from investment entrepreneur David Booth, for whom UChicago's Booth School of Business is named. Until now, much of the research on the microbiome -- the community of bacteria, fungi, viruses and other microorganisms living in the body, primarily the digestive tract -- and its relation to human health has focused on its relationship to disease. Recent discoveries, many at the University of Chicago, demonstrate that the genetic material encoded within the microbiome is a critical factor in fine-tuning the immune system and can be powerful in maintaining well-being and preventing disease. New computer technology to integrate and analyze vast amounts of biological and medical data -- pioneered by the National Cancer Institute Genomic Data Commons, developed and operated by the university -- also is allowing researchers from disparate disciplines and locations to work toward common interests and solutions. The Duchossois (pronounced DUCH-ah-swah) family wanted to support the application of these discoveries to improve health, and turned to leaders at the University of Chicago for ideas. "We wanted to find a way to be transformative in our giving and looked to the University of Chicago and asked, 'What is the nature of what's in our bodies that helps us stay well?'" said Ashley Duchossois Joyce, president of The Duchossois Family Foundation. "They came back with an answer that connected all the dots, confirming the potential for a new science of wellness that fundamentally explores how the immune system and microbiome interact." Focusing on factors crucial to maintaining wellness could greatly expand the tools available to medical researchers and entrepreneurs. Early targets identified by institute scientists envision a potential future in which: The institute will build on insights already gained from research at the University of Chicago. "The family recognized the university's and medical center's leadership in genomics, the human immune system, data analytics and the microbiome," said T. Conrad Gilliam, dean for basic science in the Division of the Biological Sciences, who will lead efforts to launch the institute. "The new institute will integrate these areas into this new science focused on longstanding health and the body's natural ability to maintain wellness." The Duchossois Family Institute will support leading-edge technologies and services including: The Duchossois Family Institute's efforts will bring together investigators across the University of Chicago as well as affiliates at Argonne National Laboratory, Marine Biological Laboratory at Woods Hole, Mass., and eventually many more partners. In addition, the university will embed commercialization specialists from its Polsky Center for Entrepreneurship and Innovation within the institute to promote participation and support of the business community to further accelerate innovation. Polsky's proven expertise will ensure that the intellectual property generated is protected, licensed, and potentially spun off for business development for the benefit of participating institutions and the entire region. "Sustainability and entrepreneurship are critical to the success of this new endeavor," said Craig Duchossois, a longtime trustee of both the university and the medical center. "The fact that we are able to leverage so many resources at one university means we can aggressively advance the progress of this new science and help society." The latest gift continues a history of giving to UChicago that spans 37 years, inspired by the care that Beverly Duchossois, late wife of Richard Duchossois, received at what was then called the University of Chicago Hospital. In 1980, Richard Duchossois established the Beverly E. Duchossois Cancer Fund in memory of his wife. In the years since, the family has given the University a total of $37 million to drive innovation and transformative care at the medical center, including a named professorship and several cancer research funds. That amount includes a $21 million gift in 1994 to establish the Duchossois Center for Advanced Medicine, which is home to outpatient specialty clinics, diagnostic centers and treatment facilities at the University of Chicago Medicine. "We are honored and privileged to be the beneficiary of such enormous generosity and are excited by what the science can accomplish," said Kenneth S. Polonsky, MD, dean of the Division of the Biological Sciences and the Pritzker School of Medicine and executive vice president of medical affairs. "The gift invests in a core strength of UChicago Medicine: our basic science research and our ability to quickly translate that research for the benefit of patients." In addition to Craig Duchossois' service as a trustee, Janet Duchossois serves as a member of the University of Chicago Women's Board. The Duchossois Family Foundation is made up of family members spanning three generations including patriarch Richard; son and daughter-in-law, Craig and Janet; daughters Kimberly Duchossois, a University of Chicago Cancer Research Foundation board member, and Dayle Fortino; and grandchildren, including Ashley Duchossois Joyce, a University of Chicago graduate and former member of the School of Social Service Administration Visiting Committee, Jessica Swoyer Green and Ilaria Woodward. About the University of Chicago Medicine The University of Chicago Medicine & Biological Sciences is one of the nation's leading academic medical institutions. It comprises the Pritzker School of Medicine, a top U.S. medical school; the University of Chicago Biomedical Sciences Division; and the University of Chicago Medical Center. Twelve Nobel Prize winners in physiology or medicine have been affiliated with the University of Chicago Medicine. Visit our research blog at sciencelife.uchospitals.edu and our newsroom at uchospitals.edu/news. Established in 1984 by first- and second-generation family members, The Duchossois Family Foundation strives to empower individuals to enhance their quality of life through wellness and education. Visit our website at TheDFF.org.

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