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News Article | May 2, 2017
Site: globenewswire.com

CHICAGO, May 02, 2017 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- GATX Corporation (NYSE:GATX) today announced that Jennifer McManus has been appointed Director, Investor Relations. In this role, Ms. McManus will be responsible for all aspects of GATX’s shareholder communications. Ms. McManus will succeed Christopher LaHurd, who has been appointed Vice President, Business Development at GATX Rail International. Ms. McManus joined GATX Corporation in 2015 as Director, Accounting Research, Policy & Planning in GATX’s Accounting Department. “We are pleased that Jennifer will be leading our investor relations activities,” said Robert C. Lyons, Executive Vice President and Chief Financial Officer of GATX Corporation. “With strong financial and communication skills, Jennifer is uniquely qualified to assist our stakeholders in understanding GATX’s strategy, strengths, and performance.” Ms. McManus received her Bachelor of Arts in Economics and Master of Accounting from The University of Michigan and her Masters of Business Administration from The University of Chicago Booth School of Business. COMPANY DESCRIPTION GATX Corporation (NYSE:GATX) strives to be recognized as the finest railcar leasing company in the world by its customers, its shareholders, its employees and the communities where it operates. As the leading global railcar lessor, GATX has been providing quality railcars and services to its customers for more than 118 years. GATX has been headquartered in Chicago, Illinois, since its founding in 1898. For more information, please visit the Company's website at www.gatx.com. Investor, corporate, financial, historical financial, and news release information may be found at www.gatx.com.


News Article | May 2, 2017
Site: globenewswire.com

CHICAGO, May 02, 2017 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- GATX Corporation (NYSE:GATX) today announced that Jennifer McManus has been appointed Director, Investor Relations. In this role, Ms. McManus will be responsible for all aspects of GATX’s shareholder communications. Ms. McManus will succeed Christopher LaHurd, who has been appointed Vice President, Business Development at GATX Rail International. Ms. McManus joined GATX Corporation in 2015 as Director, Accounting Research, Policy & Planning in GATX’s Accounting Department. “We are pleased that Jennifer will be leading our investor relations activities,” said Robert C. Lyons, Executive Vice President and Chief Financial Officer of GATX Corporation. “With strong financial and communication skills, Jennifer is uniquely qualified to assist our stakeholders in understanding GATX’s strategy, strengths, and performance.” Ms. McManus received her Bachelor of Arts in Economics and Master of Accounting from The University of Michigan and her Masters of Business Administration from The University of Chicago Booth School of Business. COMPANY DESCRIPTION GATX Corporation (NYSE:GATX) strives to be recognized as the finest railcar leasing company in the world by its customers, its shareholders, its employees and the communities where it operates. As the leading global railcar lessor, GATX has been providing quality railcars and services to its customers for more than 118 years. GATX has been headquartered in Chicago, Illinois, since its founding in 1898. For more information, please visit the Company's website at www.gatx.com. Investor, corporate, financial, historical financial, and news release information may be found at www.gatx.com.


News Article | February 22, 2017
Site: www.marketwired.com

TUCSON, AZ--(Marketwired - February 22, 2017) - The Tucson Museum of Art and Historic Block is pleased to announce the launch of a naming opportunity initiative with its first major gift in the program, $500,000 to name a new feature exhibition gallery the James J. and Louise R. Glasser Gallery. The announcement also signals the beginning of the largest renovation of the Museum campus since 2000 in conjunction with a reinstallation of the Museum's exhibits. The renovation is scheduled to take place through the summer of 2017 and will include the Main Building, the John K. Goodman Pavilion, and the Moore Courtyard. A celebration of the renovation and reinstallation will be held in mid-October. "The Tucson Museum of Art and Historic Block is reinventing the way it looks as a nearly century-old organization," said TMA CEO Jeremy Mikolajczak. "As we embark on this new venture, it is through the vision and support of Jim and Louise Glasser that we can advance our mission and access, and enhance the visitor experience. This gift will allow us to completely transform the way we install and present feature exhibitions." The Glassers have a long history of philanthropy in Tucson and their native Chicago where they have been actively involved in the Tucson Museum of Art, Tucson Symphony Orchestra, University of Arizona, Sonoran Institute, Women's Foundation of Southern Arizona, Community Foundation for Southern Arizona, Rehabilitation Institute of Chicago, The Art Institute of Chicago, The University of Chicago, Lake Forest Hospital, and Chicago Botanic Garden. "The arts have been significant to our family, and a shared passion for Louise and me," said James Glasser. "We believe art is education and inspiration. In making this gift, it is our desire to help expand the wonderful experiences the Museum provides as a cultural asset to our community." This is the Glasser's second major gift to TMA. They endowed the curator position for the Art of the American West collection in 2011. James Glasser has served on the Museum's Board of Trustee's since 2006. "As friends of the museum, Louise and I have seen thousands of children and adults engage with art and each other," Mr. Glasser said. "It makes us happy to be able to express our commitment to the Museum and help expand upon the role it plays in our community." The naming opportunity is one of several available in an effort to raise funds for renovation of the entire TMA campus, and to build an endowment for the Museum, Mikolajczak said. Opportunities are available from $100,000 to name galleries and other facilities such as the Museum Store. "Our Museum impacts more than 125,000 people each year through admissions, education programs, outreach and community events," Mikolajczak said. "TMA is a historic and integral part of the fabric of Tucson and we want to ensure its long-term sustainability." The Museum will remain open during the summer renovation and reinstallation of the exhibits, offering extended programs focusing on the historic properties around the campus at 140 N. Main Ave. The Museum will offer free admission from July 9 through October 20. The John K. Goodman Pavilion will reopen in September in coordination with Museum's popular admission - free program - Second SundAZe @ TMA: Presented by The Stonewall Foundation. In addition to this summer's renovation, the long-term renovation plan includes relocation of the Museum Store, expanding collection galleries, expanding TMALearn's "Creative Space," an interactive family education center, reopening of the Museum's Main Avenue entrance, and new access between the Main Museum Building and the Goodman Pavilion. The Museum is located at 140 N. Main Avenue in historic downtown Tucson at the crossroads of West Alameda Street and North Main Avenue. Parking is free in the Museum's lot on West Washington Street. Free First Thursday: Play! Happy Hours @ TMA: 5:00 - 8:00 p.m. Free admission for all, make, drink, and explore. Second SundAZe @ TMA: 12:00 - 5:00 p.m. Free admission for Arizona and Sonora, Mexico residents every second Sunday of the month, including Picture This! Art for Families activities: 1:00 - 3:00 p.m., music and photo booth. Fun for all ages. Adults, $12; Senior (65+), $10; Student (with college ID), $7; Youth (13-17), $7; Child (12 and under), free; Veteran with ID, free; Museum Member, Free. About the Tucson Museum of Art and Historic Block The Tucson Museum of Art and Historic Block's mission is Connecting Art to Life. The Museum was founded 1924 in the El Presidio Historic District of downtown Tucson. It is Southern Arizona's premier presenter of fine art and art education programs. The Museum features permanent and traveling exhibitions of Modern and Contemporary, Native American, American West, Latin American, and Asian art. The 74,000 square foot Museum offers guided tours, education programs, and studio art classes in a contemporary building. The Museum's Historic Block of 19th and 20th C. adobe and Mission Revival-style buildings, encompassing an entire four-acre city block, includes the John K. Goodman Pavilion of Western Art, displaying the Museum's notable art of the American West collection, the highly acclaimed Museum restaurant Café a la C'Art, and additional exhibition and studio spaces. For more information, please visit www.TucsonMuseumofArt.org or call (520) 624-2333. Follow the latest events on Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter. TMA is a private 501(c)(3) charitable arts and education organization.


News Article | February 27, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

(PRINCETON, N.J., Feb. 27, 2017) - Bristol-Myers Squibb Company (NYSE:BMY) today announced that Columbia University Medical Center and Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre (Peter Mac) have joined the International Immuno-Oncology Network (II-ON), a global peer-to-peer collaboration between Bristol-Myers Squibb and academia that aims to advance Immuno-Oncology (I-O) science and translational medicine to improve patient outcomes. Launched in 2012 by Bristol-Myers Squibb, the II-ON was one of the first networks to bring academia and industry together to further the scientific understanding of I-O, and has expanded from 10 to 15 sites including more than 250 investigators working on over 150 projects across 20 tumor types. The II-ON has generated cutting-edge I-O data that have informed the development of new I-O agents, yielded publications and produced some of the earliest findings on a variety of biomarkers and target identification and validation. "Bristol-Myers Squibb has long believed the future of cancer research is dependent on investments in science and partnerships. We formed the II-ON to facilitate innovation in I-O science and drug discovery by providing a streamlined framework for peer-to-peer collaboration among global cancer research leaders," said Nils Lonberg, Head of Oncology Biology Discovery at Bristol-Myers Squibb. "The significant discoveries generated by the II-ON over the past five years have not only informed our robust early I-O pipeline, but also serve to advance the entire field. We are proud to collaborate with Columbia University Medical Center and Peter Mac, and together with the entire II-ON will continue to lead pioneering research and heighten our collective understanding of the science behind I-O." Through the II-ON, Bristol-Myers Squibb is collaborating with leading cancer research institutions around the world to generate innovative I-O science, launch biology-driven trials and seek out cutting-edge technologies with the goal of translating research findings into clinical trials and, ultimately, clinical practice. "I-O research may be transforming the way we treat cancer," said Charles G. Drake, MD, PhD, Professor of Medicine at Columbia University Medical Center and Director of Genitourinary Oncology and Associate Director for Clinical Research at the Herbert Irving Comprehensive Cancer Center at New York-Presbyterian/Columbia. "The II-ON offers a tremendous opportunity to work smarter and faster along with our colleagues to address fundamental scientific questions in I-O." "We believe the collective knowledge and research power of the II-ON will generate groundbreaking findings in I-O with the potential to improve outcomes for people affected by cancer," said Professor Joe Trapani, Executive Director Cancer Research and Head of the Cancer Immunology Program at Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Melbourne, Australia. Building on the success of the II-ON, Bristol-Myers Squibb has invested in several other models of scientific collaboration with academic partners across the globe, including the Global Expert Centers Initiative (GECI) and the Immuno-Oncology Integrated Community Oncology Network (IO-ICON). "We believe a one-size-fits-all research approach does not facilitate innovation," said Lonberg. "Our tailored collaborations with academic centers expand our research capabilities and accelerate our collective ability to deliver potentially life-changing results for patients." The II-ON, formed in 2012, is a global peer-to-peer collaboration between Bristol-Myers Squibb and academia advancing the science of Immuno-Oncology (I-O) through a series of preclinical, translational and biology-focused research objectives. The research in the collaboration is focused on three fundamental scientific pillars: understanding the mechanisms of resistance to immunotherapy; identifying patient populations likely to benefit from immunotherapy; and exploring novel combination therapies that may enhance anti-tumor response through complementary mechanisms of action. The II-ON facilitates the translation of scientific research findings into drug discovery and development, with the goal of introducing new treatment options into clinical practice. In addition to Bristol-Myers Squibb, the II-ON currently comprises 15 leading cancer research institutions, including: Clinica Universidad Navarra, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, The Earle A. Chiles Research Institute (Providence Health & Services), Institut Gustave Roussy, Istituto Nazionale per lo Studio e la Cura dei Tumori "Fondazione G. Pascale", Bloomberg-Kimmel Institute for Cancer Immunotherapy at the Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, National Cancer Center Japan, The Netherlands Cancer Institute, The Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust and The Institute of Cancer Research, University College London, The University of Chicago, West German Cancer Center/University Hospital Essen, and now Columbia University Medical Center and Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre. Bristol-Myers Squibb: At the Forefront of Immuno-Oncology Science & Innovation At Bristol-Myers Squibb, patients are at the center of everything we do. Our vision for the future of cancer care is focused on researching and developing transformational Immuno-Oncology (I-O) medicines that will raise survival expectations in hard-to-treat cancers and will change the way patients live with cancer. We are leading the scientific understanding of I-O through our extensive portfolio of investigational and approved agents - including the first combination of two I-O agents in metastatic melanoma - and our differentiated clinical development program, which is studying broad patient populations across more than 20 types of cancers with 12 clinical-stage molecules designed to target different immune system pathways. Our deep expertise and innovative clinical trial designs uniquely position us to advance the science of combinations across multiple tumors and potentially deliver the next wave of I-O combination regimens with a sense of urgency. We also continue to pioneer research that will help facilitate a deeper understanding of the role of immune biomarkers and inform which patients will benefit most from I-O therapies. We understand making the promise of I-O a reality for the many patients who may benefit from these therapies requires not only innovation on our part, but also close collaboration with leading experts in the field. Our partnerships with academia, government, advocacy and biotech companies support our collective goal of providing new treatment options to advance the standards of clinical practice. Bristol-Myers Squibb is a global biopharmaceutical company whose mission is to discover, develop and deliver innovative medicines that help patients prevail over serious diseases. For more information about Bristol-Myers Squibb, visit us at BMS.com or follow us on LinkedIn, Twitter, YouTube and Facebook. This press release contains "forward-looking statements" as that term is defined in the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995 regarding the research, development and commercialization of pharmaceutical products. Such forward-looking statements are based on current expectations and involve inherent risks and uncertainties, including factors that could delay, divert or change any of them, and could cause actual outcomes and results to differ materially from current expectations. No forward-looking statement can be guaranteed. Forward-looking statements in this press release should be evaluated together with the many uncertainties that affect Bristol-Myers Squibb's business, particularly those identified in the cautionary factors discussion in Bristol-Myers Squibb's Annual Report on Form 10-K for the year ended December 31, 2016 in our Quarterly Reports on Form 10-Q and our Current Reports on Form 8-K. Bristol-Myers Squibb undertakes no obligation to publicly update any forward-looking statement, whether as a result of new information, future events or otherwise.


News Article | February 21, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

New research from The University of Texas at Austin reveals that the Earth's unique iron composition isn't linked to the formation of the planet's core, calling into question a prevailing theory about the events that shaped our planet during its earliest years. The research, published in Nature Communications on Feb. 20, opens the door for other competing theories about why the Earth, relative to other planets, has higher levels of heavy iron isotopes. Among them: light iron isotopes may have been vaporized into space by a large impact with another planet that formed the moon; the slow churning of the mantle as it makes and recycles the Earth's crust may preferentially incorporate heavy iron into rock; or, the composition of the raw material that formed the planet in its earliest days may have been enriched with heavy iron. An isotope is a variety of atom that has a different weight from other atoms of the same element because it has a different numbers of neutrons. "The Earth's core formation was probably the biggest event affecting Earth's history. Materials that make up the whole Earth were melted and differentiated," said Jung-Fu Lin, a professor at the UT Jackson School of Geosciences and one of the study's authors. "But in this study, we say that there must be other origins for Earth's iron isotope anomaly." Jin Liu, now a postdoctoral researcher at Stanford University, led the research while earning his Ph.D. at the Jackson School. Collaborators include scientists from The University of Chicago, Sorbonne Universities in France, Argonne National Laboratory, the Center for High Pressure Science and Advanced Technology Research in China, and the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. Rock samples from other planetary bodies and objects--ranging from the moon, to Mars, to ancient meteorites called chondrites--all share about the same ratio of heavy to light iron isotopes. In comparison to these samples from space, rocks from Earth have about 0.01 percent more heavy iron isotopes than light isotopes. That might not sound like much, but Lin said it's significant enough to make the Earth's iron composition unique among known worlds. "This 0.01 percent anomaly is very significant compared with, say, chondrites," Lin said. "This significant difference thus represents a different source or origin of our planet." Lin said that one of the most popular theories to explain the Earth's iron signature is that the relatively large size of the planet (compared with other rocky bodies in the solar system) created high pressure and high temperature conditions during core formation that made different proportions of heavy and light iron isotopes accumulate in the core and mantle. This resulted in a larger share of heavy iron isotopes bonding with elements that make up the rocky mantle, while lighter iron isotopes bonded together and with other trace metals to form the Earth's core. But when the research team used a diamond anvil to subject small samples of metal alloys and silicate rocks to core formation pressures, they not only found that the iron isotopes stayed put, but that the bonds between iron and other elements got stronger. Instead of breaking and rebonding with common mantle or core elements, the initial bond configuration got sturdier. "Our high pressure studies find that iron isotopic fractionation between silicate mantle and metal core is minimal," said Liu, the lead author. Co-author Nicolas Dauphas, a professor at the University of Chicago, emphasized that analyzing the atomic scale measurements was a feat unto itself. "One has to use sophisticated mathematical techniques to make sense of the measurements," he said. "It took a dream team to pull this off." Helen Williams, a geology lecturer at the University of Cambridge, said it's difficult to know the physical conditions of Earth's core formation, but that the high pressures in the experiment make for a more realistic simulation. "This is a really elegant study using a highly novel approach that confirms older experimental results and extends them to much higher pressures appropriate to the likely conditions of core-mantle equilibrium on Earth," Williams said. Lin said it will take more research to uncover the reason for the Earth's unique iron signature, and that experiments that approximate early conditions on Earth will play a key role because rocks from the core are impossible to attain. The research was funded by the National Science Foundation, the Center for High Pressure Science and Technology Advanced Research, NASA, the French National Research Agency, and the Consortium for Materials Properties Research in Earth Sciences.


News Article | February 21, 2017
Site: www.rdmag.com

New research from The University of Texas at Austin reveals that the Earth's unique iron composition isn't linked to the formation of the planet's core, calling into question a prevailing theory about the events that shaped our planet during its earliest years. The research, published in Nature Communications on Feb. 20, opens the door for other competing theories about why the Earth, relative to other planets, has higher levels of heavy iron isotopes. Among them: light iron isotopes may have been vaporized into space by a large impact with another planet that formed the moon; the slow churning of the mantle as it makes and recycles the Earth's crust may preferentially incorporate heavy iron into rock; or, the composition of the raw material that formed the planet in its earliest days may have been enriched with heavy iron. An isotope is a variety of atom that has a different weight from other atoms of the same element because it has a different numbers of neutrons. "The Earth's core formation was probably the biggest event affecting Earth's history. Materials that make up the whole Earth were melted and differentiated," said Jung-Fu Lin, a professor at the UT Jackson School of Geosciences and one of the study's authors. "But in this study, we say that there must be other origins for Earth's iron isotope anomaly." Jin Liu, now a postdoctoral researcher at Stanford University, led the research while earning his Ph.D. at the Jackson School. Collaborators include scientists from The University of Chicago, Sorbonne Universities in France, Argonne National Laboratory, the Center for High Pressure Science and Advanced Technology Research in China, and the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. Rock samples from other planetary bodies and objects--ranging from the moon, to Mars, to ancient meteorites called chondrites--all share about the same ratio of heavy to light iron isotopes. In comparison to these samples from space, rocks from Earth have about 0.01 percent more heavy iron isotopes than light isotopes. That might not sound like much, but Lin said it's significant enough to make the Earth's iron composition unique among known worlds. "This 0.01 percent anomaly is very significant compared with, say, chondrites," Lin said. "This significant difference thus represents a different source or origin of our planet." Lin said that one of the most popular theories to explain the Earth's iron signature is that the relatively large size of the planet (compared with other rocky bodies in the solar system) created high pressure and high temperature conditions during core formation that made different proportions of heavy and light iron isotopes accumulate in the core and mantle. This resulted in a larger share of heavy iron isotopes bonding with elements that make up the rocky mantle, while lighter iron isotopes bonded together and with other trace metals to form the Earth's core. But when the research team used a diamond anvil to subject small samples of metal alloys and silicate rocks to core formation pressures, they not only found that the iron isotopes stayed put, but that the bonds between iron and other elements got stronger. Instead of breaking and rebonding with common mantle or core elements, the initial bond configuration got sturdier. "Our high pressure studies find that iron isotopic fractionation between silicate mantle and metal core is minimal," said Liu, the lead author. Co-author Nicolas Dauphas, a professor at the University of Chicago, emphasized that analyzing the atomic scale measurements was a feat unto itself. "One has to use sophisticated mathematical techniques to make sense of the measurements," he said. "It took a dream team to pull this off." Helen Williams, a geology lecturer at the University of Cambridge, said it's difficult to know the physical conditions of Earth's core formation, but that the high pressures in the experiment make for a more realistic simulation. "This is a really elegant study using a highly novel approach that confirms older experimental results and extends them to much higher pressures appropriate to the likely conditions of core-mantle equilibrium on Earth," Williams said. Lin said it will take more research to uncover the reason for the Earth's unique iron signature, and that experiments that approximate early conditions on Earth will play a key role because rocks from the core are impossible to attain.


News Article | February 22, 2017
Site: co.newswire.com

The Luzzatto Company, Inc. (TLC), a Santa Monica-based real estate investment firm, announced that Asher Luzzatto has joined the firm as Vice President & General Counsel. In his new role, Luzzatto will focus on all aspects of TLC operations, including acquisitions, investor relations, asset management, financing, and development. He will also oversee all of TLC’s in-house legal work. Prior to joining TLC, Mr. Luzzatto was an attorney at Pircher, Nichols & Meeks, one of the premiere real estate law firms in the United States. His practice focused on complex real estate transactions, with an emphasis on the representation of private equity funds and other institutional investors in the acquisition, disposition, financing and leasing of commercial real estate assets. Mr. Luzzatto is also the owner and founder of Hyperslow, a wellness complex in Miracle Mile. Mr. Luzzatto has a B.A. from University of California, Los Angeles and a J.D. from The University of Chicago Law School. “We’re delighted welcome Asher to our team,” said Marc Luzzatto, President of TLC. “He’s ready to make an immediate impact in our office and drive the firm forward as we look to accelerate the pace of our acquisitions and continue our legacy of generating above-market returns on our investments.” TLC is a Santa Monica, Calif. private equity firm that invests nationwide in real estate and real estate-related debt with existing investments in ten states. TLC acquires properties through its equity fund as well as through existing ventures and partnerships with high net worth individuals and institutional investors.  For more information, please visit:  www.luzzattocompany.com.


News Article | February 28, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

People with intermittent explosive disorder at five times greater risk for substance abuse than those who don't display frequent aggressive behavior People with intermittent explosive disorder (IED)--a condition marked by frequent physical or verbal outbursts--are at five times greater risk for abusing substances such as alcohol, tobacco and marijuana than those who don't display frequent aggressive behavior, according to a new study by researchers from the University of Chicago. In the study, published Feb. 28, 2017 in the Journal of Clinical Psychiatry, Emil Coccaro, MD, and colleagues analyzed data from more than 9,200 subjects in the National Comorbidity Survey, a national survey of mental health in the United States. They found that as the severity of aggressive behavior increased, so did levels of daily and weekly substance use. The findings suggest that a history of frequent, aggressive behavior is a risk factor for later substance abuse, and effective treatment of aggression could delay or even prevent substance abuse in young people. IED affects as many as 16 million Americans, more than bipolar disorder and schizophrenia combined. It is often first diagnosed in adolescents, some of whom are as young as 11, years before substance abuse problems usually develop. IED runs in families and is thought to have a significant genetic component, although Coccaro said people tend to treat it as a social-behavioral issue instead of as a true neurobiological disorder. "People don't see this as a medical problem. They think of it as simply bad behavior they have developed over the course of their lives, but it isn't. It has significant biology and neuroscience behind it," said Coccaro, who is the Ellen C. Manning Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Neuroscience at UChicago. Previous research has implied that aggressive behavior in IED is due to the presence of other psychiatric disorders, such as anxiety or depression. But the new UChicago study found no such relationship. While substance abuse, like excessive drinking, can clearly make aggressive behavior worse, the onset of IED almost always precedes the development of chronic substance abuse. Coccaro and his team found that IED preceded substance abuse in 92.5 percent of the cases where subjects developed both disorders. Coccaro emphasized that early psychological intervention, medication and cognitive therapy are the most effective treatments to prevent, or at least delay, substance abuse problems in adolescents diagnosed with IED. "What you're really treating is the emotional dysregulation that leads to aggression," Coccaro said. "The earlier you treat this dysregulation, the more likely you are to offset other disorders that come later down the road." The study, "Intermittent Explosive Disorder and Substance Use Disorder: Analysis of the National Comorbidity Survey Replication Sample," was supported by the National Institute of Mental Health. Additional authors include Jennifer Fanning, PhD, and Royce Lee, MD, both from the University of Chicago. The University of Chicago Medicine & Biological Sciences is one of the nation's leading academic medical institutions. It comprises the Pritzker School of Medicine, a top 10 medical school in the nation; the University of Chicago Biomedical Sciences Division; and the University of Chicago Medical Center, which recently opened the Center for Care and Discovery, a $700 million specialty medical facility. Twelve Nobel Prize winners in physiology or medicine have been affiliated with the University of Chicago Medicine. Visit our research blog at sciencelife.uchospitals.edu and our newsroom at uchospitals.edu/news.


News Article | February 14, 2017
Site: globenewswire.com

DURHAM, N.C., Feb. 14, 2017 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- Heat Biologics, Inc. (“Heat”) (Nasdaq:HTBX), a leader in the development of immunotherapies designed to activate a patient’s immune system against cancer, announced that it will present a poster reporting additional results from the Phase 2 trial evaluating HS-410 (vesigenurtacel-L) in combination with standard of care, Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG), for the treatment of non-muscle invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC) at the 2017 Genitourinary (GU) Cancers Symposium on February 17, 2017 in Orlando, Florida.  The poster will be presented by study principal investigator, Gary Steinberg, MD, The Bruce and Beth White Family Professor of Surgery and Director of Urologic Oncology at The University of Chicago Medical Center. Title: Immune Response Results of Vesigenurtacel-L (HS-410) in Combination with BCG from a Randomized Phase 2 Trial in Patients with Non-Muscle Invasive Bladder Cancer (NMIBC) Date and Time: February 17, 2017 at 12:15 – 1:45 p.m. and 6 – 7 p.m. EST Copies of the abstract are available and can be viewed online through the ASCO website at http://gucasym.org.  The poster will be uploaded to the Publications section of Heat’s corporate website in line with the conference’s embargo policy. About Heat Biologics, Inc. Heat Biologics, Inc. (Nasdaq:HTBX) is an immuno-oncology company developing novel therapies that are designed to activate a patient’s immune system against cancer utilizing an engineered form of gp96, a protein that activates the immune system when cells die. Heat’s highly specific T cell-stimulating therapeutic vaccine platform technologies, ImPACT and ComPACT, form the basis of its product candidates. These platforms, in combination with other therapies, such as checkpoint inhibitors, are designed to address three distinct but synergistic mechanisms of action: robust activation of CD8+ “killer” T cells (one of the human immune system’s most potent weapons against cancer); reversal of tumor-induced immune suppression; and T cell co-stimulation to further enhance patients’ immune response.  Currently, Heat is conducting a Phase 1b trial with HS-110 (viagenpumatucel-L) in combination with an anti-PD-1 checkpoint inhibitor to treat patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and a Phase 2 trial with HS-410 (vesigenurtacel-L) in patients with non-muscle invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC). Heat’s wholly-owned subsidiary, Zolovax, Inc., is developing therapeutic and preventative vaccines to treat infectious diseases based on Heat’s gp96 vaccine technology, with a current focus on the development of a Zika vaccine in conjunction with the University of Miami. For more information, please visit www.heatbio.com. Forward Looking Statements This press release includes forward-looking statements within the meaning of the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995 on our current expectations and projections about future events.  In some cases, forward-looking statements can be identified by terminology such as "may," "should," "potential," "continue," "expects," "anticipates," "intends," "plans," "believes," "estimates," and similar expressions.  These statements are based upon current beliefs, expectations and assumptions and include statements regarding the potential of Heat’s ImPACT and ComPACT therapies.  These statements are based on management’s expectations and assumptions as of the date of this press release and are subject to a number of risks and uncertainties, many of which are difficult to predict that could cause actual results to differ materially from current expectations and assumptions from those set forth or implied by any forward-looking statements, including the ability of Heat's ImPACT and ComPACT therapies to perform as designed, to demonstrate safety and efficacy, as well as results that are consistent with prior results, the ability to enroll patients and complete the clinical trials on time and achieve desired results and benefits, the company’s ability to obtain regulatory approvals for commercialization of product candidates or to comply with ongoing regulatory requirements, regulatory limitations relating to the company’s  ability to promote or commercialize its product candidates for specific indications, acceptance of its product candidates in the marketplace and the successful development, marketing or sale of products, the company’s ability to maintain its license agreements, the continued maintenance and growth of its patent estate, its ability to establish and maintain collaborations, its  ability to obtain or maintain the capital or grants necessary to fund its research and development activities, and its ability to retain its key scientists or management personnel and the other factors described in the company’s annual report on Form 10-K for the year ended December 31, 2015 and other filings with the SEC.  The information in this release is provided only as of the date of this release and the company undertakes no obligation to update any forward-looking statements contained in this release based on new information, future events, or otherwise, except as required by law.


News Article | February 28, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

Ibis Capital, an independent wealth management firm for successful families seeking to achieve financial peace of mind, today announced Robert Meyer, CEO and CIO, has earned the Certified Private Wealth Manager® designation. The CPWA, delivered by Investment Management Consultants Association (IMCA), is the only advanced designation for financial advisors and consultants who work with high-net-worth clients on the life cycle of wealth. The addition of the CPWA designation further demonstrates Ibis Capital’s commitment to the continuing education required to address the unique needs of its clients. Meyer is responsible for maintaining the overall direction and strategy of the firm. Meyer has more than two decades experience in portfolio management, is a CERTIFIED FINANCIAL PLANNER™ Practitioner, a Chartered Life Underwriter® and a Certified Private Wealth Advisor®. The CPWA mark identifies individuals who have met the experience requirements, have successfully completed coursework in advanced wealth management strategies and applied concepts at The University of Chicago Booth School of Business, and have passed comprehensive examination covering the following areas: CPWA licensees must also agree to ongoing continuing education requirements, uphold IMCA’s Code of Professional Responsibility, and adhere to the Rules and Guideline for use of the Marks. About Investment Management Consultants Association IMCA was established in 1985 to set the standards and practices for the investment management consulting profession and provide investment consultants with the credentials and tools required to best serve their clients. https://www.imca.org/about-imca About Ibis Capital Ibis Capital is an independent wealth management firm that offers a holistic financial planning approach to clients with additional services including advanced estate planning, tax mitigation strategies and behavioral economics. Its business model provides expanded solution offerings and the talented team required to offer top-tier service to choice clientele. Ibis Capital has approximately $350 million in assets under advisement and services approximately 95 clients, including high-net-worth families, middle market business owners, pension plans, endowments, and foundations. For more information please visit http://www.ibiscapital.com or follow Ibis on Twitter and LinkedIn.

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