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News Article | May 10, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

Digital marketers have a new way to prove their professional competency and employers have a way to ensure they’re hiring the best candidates. The American Marketing Association (AMA) and LinkedIn Learning have joined forces to create a professional certification program that ensures digital marketers have command of all the relevant skills needed for success in today’s dynamic environment. Digital marketers can assess their skills by taking the AMA’s free practice exam. They can then take courses on LinkedIn Learning’s AMA-approved Learning Path which contains 20 updated online courses taught by top industry thought leaders and innovators. The subjects cover everything digital marketers need to know: analytics, SEO, email marketing, content marketing, UX and online advertising. After completing these courses, digital marketers can take the AMA Professional Certified Marketer, Digital Marketing exam. This thorough exam lasts two hours and contains 120 questions. Upon passing, marketers receive their PCM®, Digital Marketing Certification which lasts for three years. “As a nonprofit organization, the AMA has 80 years of credibility, trust, objectivity, neutrality; its standing as the go-to authority on marketing is unassailable.” remarked AMA CEO Russ Klein. “LinkedIn Learning is an excellent partner for the AMA because of its industry-leading curriculum and unparalleled reach and reputation among those in the marketing community.” "With the launch of this new AMA Learning Path, we look forward to helping marketers across the globe acquire the skills they need to earn their PCM®, Digital Marketing Certifications," said Tanya Staples, Senior Director of Content and Development at LinkedIn Learning. "We aim for this partnership to have a truly meaningful impact on the career trajectories of these professionals." AMA Digital Marketing Certification Task Force Chair, Dr. Vanitha Swaminathan, Thomas Marshall Professor of Marketing, at the Katz School of Business at University of Pittsburgh remarked, “We have leveraged the cutting-edge digital marketing tools behind the scenes to ensure we have a relevant, contemporary certification program that will be of value in the marketplace. I truly believe that AMA should be at the forefront of transforming the role of marketing as a highly strategic, analytical, and skills-based discipline. I truly believe that the certification is one concrete step to shift the field in the right direction.” AMA Digital Marketing Certification Task Force member Andy Crestodina, Strategic Director of Orbit Media Studios added, “Employers want to feel confident that when they hire a digital marketer, they can perform. Achieving this certification will ensure someone has the skill set to make a meaningful contribution to a business.” Task Force member Melissa G. Wilson from Networlding Publishing added, “This curriculum has more than 40 hours of instruction. These are difficult courses, but it’s material digital marketers need to know.” Task Force member Pat Swindle from Havas Worldwide and The University of Chicago said, “As digital marketing evolves, this program will change. We have the people, processes and passion to ensure the AMA Professional Certified Marketer, Digital Marketing Program will be a gold standard for digital marketers. And in LinkedIn Learning, they have a superior way to keep their skills on the cutting edge.” To learn more about AMA Professional Certified Marketer, Digital Marketing program, visit AMA.org or @AMA_Marketing. About American Marketing Association (AMA) The AMA is trusted by nearly a million marketing and sales professionals a year worldwide. It has more than 70 professional chapters and over 350 collegiate chapters throughout North America and select international locations. The American Marketing Association (AMA) is the largest marketing association in the world. AMA serves organizations and individuals who practice, teach and study marketing across the globe.  It serves as a forum for connecting like-minded individuals to foster knowledge sharing and relationship building; to be a trusted resource for marketing information, tools, education and training; and to advance marketing practice and thought leadership. For more information about the AMA, visit http://www.ama.org or follow the latest AMA news at @AMA_Marketing.


Imagine waiting months for a colorectal cancer screening, only for the appointment to fall between the cracks because of poor communication or, worse, being diagnosed with more advanced disease because of a long delay or lack of access to health care. Unfortunately, vulnerable minority populations on Chicago's South Side, in Cook County and beyond face these problems routinely. As a result, many people suffer unnecessarily from colorectal cancer. The University of Chicago Medicine is hoping to lead the way in addressing this issue through ILColonCARES.org, a new website being launched as part of an innovative partnership designed to help health care providers directly schedule colorectal cancer screenings for Cook County residents ages 50 to 75. The web portal, known as Illinois Colon CARES, also seeks to enhance communication across health systems and provide timely results to patients and their doctors. Inaugural partners for the initiative, in addition to UChicago Medicine, include Rush University Medical Center, Heartland Health Centers, Community Health, Friend Family Health, Asian Human Services Family Health Center, and Swedish Covenant Hospital. They are donating a total of nearly 100 screenings for the launch. The potential to expand and scale this model across the state will reach 6,000 a year. The portal will be unveiled Friday, May 12, 2017, at the Midwest Health Equity Conference in Chicago. The conference brings together community and health professionals who are focused on preventing hepatitis, liver cancer and colorectal cancer among minority populations. In its initial stages, Illinois Colon CARES (Colorectal Cancer Alliance to Reinforce and Enhance Screening) will target uninsured and vulnerable populations who are most at risk for developing the disease. The Center for Asian Health Equity (CAHE), which received a $3.5 million federal grant to increase colorectal cancer screening rates in Cook County, wants to bring the technology to other communities across the country. "If we find colon cancer early, nine out of 10 people will have a long-term survival and can be cured from the disease," said Karen Kim, MD, professor of medicine and director of CAHE, a partnership between UChicago Medicine and the Asian Health Coalition. "Unfortunately, about 40 percent of people diagnosed with colon cancer are found in late stages when the survival rate is very low. This is a disease that needs special attention because we can prevent it with screening." Fewer than half of Illinois residents who should be screened for colorectal cancer have access to such services. The tragedy of this situation is that, unlike most cancers, colorectal cancer often starts as a benign growth that can be identified and removed during screening, before cancer forms. Most federally funded health clinics provide screening to patients. However, when there is a positive result, it is very difficult to access timely and high-quality colonoscopy follow-up. Illinois Colon CARES was developed to address this gap in services, especially for vulnerable populations who are at high risk for colorectal cancer. "Federally qualified health centers are faced with challenges in communicating with hospital systems that do not shared similar electronic medical record platforms," Kim said. This portal creates a process to eliminate these gaps in needed services and follow-up care by partnering with hospitals to donate colonoscopy services for use by health centers through a single accessible, online portal. "The beauty of Illinois Colon CARES is the broad partnership and win-win-win situation. Hospitals provide community benefit to their surrounding community, federally qualified health centers have access to needed services and the community gets screened," Kim said. Kim said she hopes the effort will eventually provide access to care for vulnerable populations in every state. She has already introduced the model to colleagues across the nation, including Dennis Ahnen, MD, professor of medicine at the University of Colorado, Denver, and steering committee member of the National Colorectal Cancer Roundtable. "The Illinois Colon CARES website is both novel and an elegant way to bring hospitals and practices who wanted to reach out to the community to a population in need of that outreach," said Ahnen. "The website and the work behind it have made it easy for the hospitals and the clinics taking care of the population in need to get colonoscopies completed and provides a simple and consistent source of donated colonoscopies."


CERAMENT G is an injectable antibiotic-eluting bone graft substitute that has proven remodeling capabilities and provides local sustained delivery of gentamicin. The data from the trial will support BONESUPPORT's PMA (Premarket Approval) filing for CERAMENT G in the US. In spite of modern day care of open tibial fractures, bone loss coupled with wound contamination and soft tissue damage continue to impair healing and recovery, particularly if infection develops. In addition, open tibial fractures result in a general infirmity, long-term disability and reduction in quality of life for patients, and a significant clinical challenge for orthopedic surgeons. The FORTIFY trial will assess CERAMENT G's ability to improve on the standard-of-care management of patients with open fractures of the tibial diaphysis. The primary endpoints of the trial will include the absence of deep infection at the fracture site and the lack of secondary procedures intended to promote fracture union. The trial will also evaluate the safety of CERAMENT G in these patients. The trial will enroll upto 230 patients at upto 30 centers in the US and Europe. Dr. Douglas Dirschl, the trial's Principal Investigator, said: "I am excited to take part in the FORTIFY clinical trial. The open tibial fracture remains the most common and one of the most troublesome open fractures managed by orthopedic surgeons. Even with modern treatment protocols, patients suffering this fracture continue to be at substantial risk of infection, fracture non-union, and prolonged disability. A product that could be inserted into the fracture site at the time of definitive treatment that could promote bone formation at the same time as reducing the risk of subsequent infection, would be a major advance in the treatment of these troublesome fractures and would have the potential to provide benefit to thousands of patients each year in the United States." Douglas R. Dirschl, MD is the Lowell T. Coggeshall Professor of Orthopedic Surgery and Chairman, Department of Orthopedic Surgery and Rehabilitation Medicine at The University of Chicago Medicine. "The treatment of the first patient in the FORTIFY trial is another key corporate milestone for BONESUPPORT. This clinical trial in a complex trauma indication is designed to demonstrate proof-of-concept that CERAMENT G can be used to improve and protect the healing process in open bone fractures in combination with standard procedures, minimizing the risk of deep infections which would result in the need for additional remedial procedures," added Richard Davies, CEO of BONESUPPORT. "We plan to use the clinical data to support our planned PMA filing for CERAMENT G in the US. We also intend to generate additional clinical data with CERAMENT G to gain a broad US label for this novel, injectable antibiotic-eluting bone graft substitute, which is rapidly being adopted in Europe." CERAMENT G combines the bone healing and bone remodeling properties of CERAMENT with the antibiotic, gentamicin. CERAMENT G drug-eluting properties enable it to provide an initial high concentration of gentamicin to the environment of the bone fracture and then a longer sustainable dose above the minimum inhibitory concentration of many of the bacteria that could cause a bone infection at the fracture site. This unique antibiotic-eluting profile helps protect the bone healing process and to promote bone remodeling. CERAMENT G received the European CE Mark in February 2013 and is now marketed in 19 countries outside the US. BONESUPPORT has developed CERAMENT as an innovative range of radiopaque injectable osteoconductive bioceramic products that have a proven ability to heal defects by remodeling to host bone in six to 12 months. Our products are effective in treating patients with fractures and bone voids caused by trauma, infection, disease or related surgery. Our lead product, CERAMENT BONE VOID FILLER (BVF) addresses important issues facing health care providers, such as avoiding hospital readmissions and revision surgery that result from failed bone healing and infection caused by residual bone voids. CERAMENT BVF is commercially available in the U.S., EU, SE Asia and the Middle East. CERAMENT's distinctive properties as a drug eluting material have been validated in clinical practice by CERAMENT G and CERAMENT V, the first CE-marked injectable antibiotic eluting bone graft substitutes. These products provide local sustained delivery of gentamicin and vancomycin, respectively. The local delivery feature enables an initial high concentration of antibiotics to the bone defect and then a longer sustainable dose above the minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) to protect bone healing and promote bone remodeling. CERAMENTG and CERAMENT V have demonstrated good results in patients with problematic bone infections including osteomyelitis. They are also used prophylactically in patients who are at risk for developing infection. CERAMENT G and CERAMENT V are available in the EU. BONESUPPORT was founded in 1999 by Prof. Lars Lidgren, an internationally respected scientist who has been the President of various musculoskeletal societies. BONESUPPORT's mission is to bring people with bone and joint diseases back to an active life. The Company is based in Lund, Sweden. http://www.bonesupport.com.


CERAMENT G is an injectable antibiotic-eluting bone graft substitute that has proven remodeling capabilities and provides local sustained delivery of gentamicin. The data from the trial will support BONESUPPORT's PMA (Premarket Approval) filing for CERAMENT G in the US. In spite of modern day care of open tibial fractures, bone loss coupled with wound contamination and soft tissue damage continue to impair healing and recovery, particularly if infection develops. In addition, open tibial fractures result in a general infirmity, long-term disability and reduction in quality of life for patients, and a significant clinical challenge for orthopedic surgeons. The FORTIFY trial will assess CERAMENT G's ability to improve on the standard-of-care management of patients with open fractures of the tibial diaphysis. The primary endpoints of the trial will include the absence of deep infection at the fracture site and the lack of secondary procedures intended to promote fracture union. The trial will also evaluate the safety of CERAMENT G in these patients. The trial will enroll upto 230 patients at upto 30 centers in the US and Europe. Dr. Douglas Dirschl, the trial's Principal Investigator, said: "I am excited to take part in the FORTIFY clinical trial. The open tibial fracture remains the most common and one of the most troublesome open fractures managed by orthopedic surgeons. Even with modern treatment protocols, patients suffering this fracture continue to be at substantial risk of infection, fracture non-union, and prolonged disability. A product that could be inserted into the fracture site at the time of definitive treatment that could promote bone formation at the same time as reducing the risk of subsequent infection, would be a major advance in the treatment of these troublesome fractures and would have the potential to provide benefit to thousands of patients each year in the United States." Douglas R. Dirschl, MD is the Lowell T. Coggeshall Professor of Orthopedic Surgery and Chairman, Department of Orthopedic Surgery and Rehabilitation Medicine at The University of Chicago Medicine. "The treatment of the first patient in the FORTIFY trial is another key corporate milestone for BONESUPPORT. This clinical trial in a complex trauma indication is designed to demonstrate proof-of-concept that CERAMENT G can be used to improve and protect the healing process in open bone fractures in combination with standard procedures, minimizing the risk of deep infections which would result in the need for additional remedial procedures," added Richard Davies, CEO of BONESUPPORT. "We plan to use the clinical data to support our planned PMA filing for CERAMENT G in the US. We also intend to generate additional clinical data with CERAMENT G to gain a broad US label for this novel, injectable antibiotic-eluting bone graft substitute, which is rapidly being adopted in Europe." CERAMENT G combines the bone healing and bone remodeling properties of CERAMENT with the antibiotic, gentamicin. CERAMENT G drug-eluting properties enable it to provide an initial high concentration of gentamicin to the environment of the bone fracture and then a longer sustainable dose above the minimum inhibitory concentration of many of the bacteria that could cause a bone infection at the fracture site. This unique antibiotic-eluting profile helps protect the bone healing process and to promote bone remodeling. CERAMENT G received the European CE Mark in February 2013 and is now marketed in 19 countries outside the US. BONESUPPORT has developed CERAMENT as an innovative range of radiopaque injectable osteoconductive bioceramic products that have a proven ability to heal defects by remodeling to host bone in six to 12 months. Our products are effective in treating patients with fractures and bone voids caused by trauma, infection, disease or related surgery. Our lead product, CERAMENT BONE VOID FILLER (BVF) addresses important issues facing health care providers, such as avoiding hospital readmissions and revision surgery that result from failed bone healing and infection caused by residual bone voids. CERAMENT BVF is commercially available in the U.S., EU, SE Asia and the Middle East. CERAMENT's distinctive properties as a drug eluting material have been validated in clinical practice by CERAMENT G and CERAMENT V, the first CE-marked injectable antibiotic eluting bone graft substitutes. These products provide local sustained delivery of gentamicin and vancomycin, respectively. The local delivery feature enables an initial high concentration of antibiotics to the bone defect and then a longer sustainable dose above the minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) to protect bone healing and promote bone remodeling. CERAMENTG and CERAMENT V have demonstrated good results in patients with problematic bone infections including osteomyelitis. They are also used prophylactically in patients who are at risk for developing infection. CERAMENT G and CERAMENT V are available in the EU. BONESUPPORT was founded in 1999 by Prof. Lars Lidgren, an internationally respected scientist who has been the President of various musculoskeletal societies. BONESUPPORT's mission is to bring people with bone and joint diseases back to an active life. The Company is based in Lund, Sweden. http://www.bonesupport.com.


News Article | May 22, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

Analysis of a 3.3 million-year-old fossil skeleton reveals the most complete spinal column of any early human relative, including vertebrae, neck and rib cage. The findings, published this week in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, indicate that portions of the human spinal structure that enable efficient walking motions were established millions of years earlier than previously thought. The fossil, known as "Selam," is a nearly complete skeleton of a 2½ year-old child discovered in Dikika, Ethiopia in 2000 by Zeresenay (Zeray) Alemseged, professor of organismal biology and anatomy at the University of Chicago and senior author of the new study. Selam, which means "peace" in the Ethiopian Amharic language, was an early human relative from the species Australopithecus afarensis--the same species as the famous Lucy skeleton. In the years since Alemseged discovered Selam, he and his lab assistant from Kenya, Christopher Kiarie, have been preparing the delicate fossil at the National Museum of Ethiopia. They slowly chipped away at the sandstone surrounding the skeleton and used advanced imaging tools to further analyze its structure. "Continued and painstaking research on Selam shows that the general structure of the human spinal column emerged over 3.3 million years ago, shedding light on one of the hallmarks of human evolution," Alemseged said. "This type of preservation is unprecedented, particularly in a young individual whose vertebrae are not yet fully fused." Many features of the human spinal column and rib cage are shared among primates. But the human spine also reflects our distinctive mode of walking upright on two feet. For instance, humans have fewer rib-bearing vertebrae - bones of the back - than those of our closest primate relatives. Humans also have more vertebrae in the lower back, which allows us to walk effectively. When and how this pattern evolved has been unknown until now because complete sets of vertebrae are rarely preserved in the fossil record. "For many years we have known of fragmentary remains of early fossil species that suggest that the shift from rib-bearing, or thoracic, vertebrae to lumbar, or lower back, vertebrae was positioned higher in the spinal column than in living humans. But we have not been able to determine how many vertebrae our early ancestors had," said Carol Ward, a Curator's Distinguished Professor of Pathology and Anatomical Sciences in the University of Missouri School of Medicine, and lead author on the study. "Selam has provided us the first glimpse into how our early ancestors' spines were organized." In order to be analyzed, Selam had to take a trip. She traveled to the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility in Grenoble, France, where Alemseged and the research team used high-resolution imaging technology to visualize the bones. "This technology provides the opportunity to virtually examine aspects of the vertebrae otherwise unattainable from the original specimen," said coauthor of the study Fred Spoor, a professor of evolutionary anatomy in the Department of Biosciences at the University College London. The scans indicated that Selam had the distinctive thoracic-to-lumbar joint transition found in other fossil human relatives, but the specimen is the first to show that, like modern humans, our earliest ancestors had only twelve thoracic vertebrae and twelve pairs of ribs. That is fewer than in most apes. "This unusual early human configuration may be a key in developing more accurate scenarios concerning the evolution of bipedality and modern human body shape," said Thierra Nalley, an assistant professor of anatomy at Western University of Health Sciences in Pomona, California, also an author on the paper. This configuration marks a transition toward the type of spinal column that allows humans to be the efficient, athletic walkers and runners we are today. "We are documenting for the first time in the fossil record the emergence of the number of the vertebrae in our history, when the transition happened from the rib-bearing vertebrae to lower back vertebrae, and when we started to extend the waist," Alemseged said. "This structure and its modification through time is one of the key events in the history of human evolution." The study, "Thoracic Vertebral Count and Thoracolumbar Transition in Australopithecus afarensis" was supported by Margaret and Will Hearst, the National Science Foundation and the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility. The University of Chicago Medicine & Biological Sciences is one of the nation's leading academic medical institutions. It comprises the Pritzker School of Medicine, a top 10 medical school in the nation; the University of Chicago Biomedical Sciences Division; and the University of Chicago Medical Center, which recently opened the Center for Care and Discovery, a $700 million specialty medical facility. Twelve Nobel Prize winners in physiology or medicine have been affiliated with the University of Chicago Medicine. Visit our research blog at sciencelife.uchospitals.edu and our newsroom at uchospitals.edu/news.


HERNDON, Va.--(BUSINESS WIRE)--A student’s ninth-grade “status” is the best indicator of whether or not he or she will graduate. The University of Chicago Consortium on Chicago School Research found that students who are on-track after their freshman year are more than three and one-half times more likely to graduate from high school in four years than students who are off-track. To help engage and motivate students who need help staying on track for graduation, Fuel Education® (FuelEd®) is launching a new, credit recovery curriculum for blended and online learning available this fall. The new FuelEd Credit Recovery Curriculum features a modern design with interactive content, adaptive release technology, growth mindset and social emotional exercises to teach grit, and powerful analytic tools—all available in a mobile and accessible learning environment. The courses are designed for students who need to recover credits in order to graduate, but learned enough to make a complete repetition of the course unnecessary. All courses are broken down into modules, each of which starts with a pre-test to evaluate the student’s existing knowledge. If a student demonstrates mastery during the module’s pre-test, the courses’ adaptive release of content allows the student to advance within the course to where he or she needs to be. For added support and motivation, FuelEd embedded content to teach students about grit and to help them develop a growth mindset and social emotional learning practices. “We believe that ‘at-promise’ students sometimes need additional support to overcome obstacles in their education. With the new credit recovery curriculum, we are pleased to provide our school and district partners rich, interactive content and tools to help them better engage students so they can stay on the path to graduation,” said Gregg Levin, Fuel Education’s General Manager. The new courses also include English Language Learners (ELL) support, including non-linguistic representation of content, audio demonstrations and pre-teaching of key vocabulary in both English and Spanish. The FuelEd Credit Recovery Curriculum can be taught by district teachers or FuelEd’s certified teachers. Its advanced analytic tools include visual dashboards to make it easy for teachers to see how a class is performing as a whole or how individual students are progressing through courses. Teachers can generate personalized reports to drive targeted remediation for individual students or small groups. The new curriculum will be released in phases, beginning with Algebra 1, Algebra 2, Geometry, English 9, English 10, and Spanish 1 in the fall, including updated health and physical education courses. FuelEd offers a total of 19 credit recovery courses. To learn more, click here to watch a video. To view a short demo, click here. Fuel Education® partners with school districts to fuel personalized learning and transform the education experience inside and outside the classroom. The company provides innovative solutions for pre-K through 12th grade that empower districts to implement successful online and blended learning programs. Its open, easy-to-use Personalized Learning Platform, PEAK™, enables teachers to customize courses using their own content, FuelEd courses and titles, third-party content, and open educational resources. Fuel Education serves more than 2,000 school districts, offering one of the industry’s largest catalogs of K–12 digital curriculum, certified instruction, professional development, and educational services. To learn more, visit fueleducation.com and Twitter. ©2017 Fuel Education LLC. All rights reserved. Fuel Education, FuelEd, and Summit are trademarks of Fuel Education LLC or its affiliates. All other trademarks are the property of their respective owners.


News Article | May 2, 2017
Site: globenewswire.com

CHICAGO, May 02, 2017 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- GATX Corporation (NYSE:GATX) today announced that Jennifer McManus has been appointed Director, Investor Relations. In this role, Ms. McManus will be responsible for all aspects of GATX’s shareholder communications. Ms. McManus will succeed Christopher LaHurd, who has been appointed Vice President, Business Development at GATX Rail International. Ms. McManus joined GATX Corporation in 2015 as Director, Accounting Research, Policy & Planning in GATX’s Accounting Department. “We are pleased that Jennifer will be leading our investor relations activities,” said Robert C. Lyons, Executive Vice President and Chief Financial Officer of GATX Corporation. “With strong financial and communication skills, Jennifer is uniquely qualified to assist our stakeholders in understanding GATX’s strategy, strengths, and performance.” Ms. McManus received her Bachelor of Arts in Economics and Master of Accounting from The University of Michigan and her Masters of Business Administration from The University of Chicago Booth School of Business. COMPANY DESCRIPTION GATX Corporation (NYSE:GATX) strives to be recognized as the finest railcar leasing company in the world by its customers, its shareholders, its employees and the communities where it operates. As the leading global railcar lessor, GATX has been providing quality railcars and services to its customers for more than 118 years. GATX has been headquartered in Chicago, Illinois, since its founding in 1898. For more information, please visit the Company's website at www.gatx.com. Investor, corporate, financial, historical financial, and news release information may be found at www.gatx.com.


News Article | May 2, 2017
Site: globenewswire.com

CHICAGO, May 02, 2017 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- GATX Corporation (NYSE:GATX) today announced that Jennifer McManus has been appointed Director, Investor Relations. In this role, Ms. McManus will be responsible for all aspects of GATX’s shareholder communications. Ms. McManus will succeed Christopher LaHurd, who has been appointed Vice President, Business Development at GATX Rail International. Ms. McManus joined GATX Corporation in 2015 as Director, Accounting Research, Policy & Planning in GATX’s Accounting Department. “We are pleased that Jennifer will be leading our investor relations activities,” said Robert C. Lyons, Executive Vice President and Chief Financial Officer of GATX Corporation. “With strong financial and communication skills, Jennifer is uniquely qualified to assist our stakeholders in understanding GATX’s strategy, strengths, and performance.” Ms. McManus received her Bachelor of Arts in Economics and Master of Accounting from The University of Michigan and her Masters of Business Administration from The University of Chicago Booth School of Business. COMPANY DESCRIPTION GATX Corporation (NYSE:GATX) strives to be recognized as the finest railcar leasing company in the world by its customers, its shareholders, its employees and the communities where it operates. As the leading global railcar lessor, GATX has been providing quality railcars and services to its customers for more than 118 years. GATX has been headquartered in Chicago, Illinois, since its founding in 1898. For more information, please visit the Company's website at www.gatx.com. Investor, corporate, financial, historical financial, and news release information may be found at www.gatx.com.


News Article | May 2, 2017
Site: globenewswire.com

CHICAGO, May 02, 2017 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- GATX Corporation (NYSE:GATX) today announced that Jennifer McManus has been appointed Director, Investor Relations. In this role, Ms. McManus will be responsible for all aspects of GATX’s shareholder communications. Ms. McManus will succeed Christopher LaHurd, who has been appointed Vice President, Business Development at GATX Rail International. Ms. McManus joined GATX Corporation in 2015 as Director, Accounting Research, Policy & Planning in GATX’s Accounting Department. “We are pleased that Jennifer will be leading our investor relations activities,” said Robert C. Lyons, Executive Vice President and Chief Financial Officer of GATX Corporation. “With strong financial and communication skills, Jennifer is uniquely qualified to assist our stakeholders in understanding GATX’s strategy, strengths, and performance.” Ms. McManus received her Bachelor of Arts in Economics and Master of Accounting from The University of Michigan and her Masters of Business Administration from The University of Chicago Booth School of Business. COMPANY DESCRIPTION GATX Corporation (NYSE:GATX) strives to be recognized as the finest railcar leasing company in the world by its customers, its shareholders, its employees and the communities where it operates. As the leading global railcar lessor, GATX has been providing quality railcars and services to its customers for more than 118 years. GATX has been headquartered in Chicago, Illinois, since its founding in 1898. For more information, please visit the Company's website at www.gatx.com. Investor, corporate, financial, historical financial, and news release information may be found at www.gatx.com.


News Article | May 2, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

The National Academy of Sciences announced today the election of 84 new members and 21 foreign associates in recognition of their distinguished and continuing achievements in original research. The National Academy of Sciences announced today the election of 84 new members and 21 foreign associates in recognition of their distinguished and continuing achievements in original research. Those elected today bring the total number of active members to 2,290 and the total number of foreign associates to 475. Foreign associates are nonvoting members of the Academy, with citizenship outside the United States. Newly elected members and their affiliations at the time of election are: Bates, Frank S.; Regents Professor, department of chemical engineering and materials science, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis Beilinson, Alexander; David and Mary Winton Green University Professor, department of mathematics, The University of Chicago, Chicago Bell, Stephen P.; investigator, Howard Hughes Medical Institute; and professor of biology, department of biology, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge Bhatia, Sangeeta N.; John J. (1929) and Dorothy Wilson Professor, Institute for Medical Engineering and Science, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge Buzsáki, György; professor, Neuroscience Institute, departments of physiology and neuroscience, New York University Langone Medical Center, New York City Carroll, Dana; distinguished professor, department of biochemistry, University of Utah School of Medicine, Salt Lake City Cohen, Judith G.; Kate Van Nuys Page Professor of Astronomy, department of astronomy, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena Crabtree, Robert H.; Conkey P. Whitehead Professor of Chemistry, department of chemistry, Yale University, New Haven, Conn. Cronan, John E.; professor and head of microbiology, professor of biochemistry, and Microbiology Alumni Professor, department of microbiology, University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign Cummins, Christopher C.; Henry Dreyfus Professor of Chemistry, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge Darensbourg, Marcetta Y.; distinguished professor of chemistry, department of chemistry, Texas A&M University, College Station DeVore, Ronald A.; The Walter E. Koss Professor and distinguished professor, department of mathematics, Texas A&M University, College Station Diamond, Douglas W.; Merton H. Miller Distinguished Service Professor of Finance, The University of Chicago, Chicago Doe, Chris Q.; investigator, Howard Hughes Medical Institute; and professor of biology, Institute of Molecular Biology, University of Oregon, Eugene Duflo, Esther; Co-founder and co-Director of the Abdul Latif Jameel Poverty Action Lab, and Professor of Poverty Alleviation and Development Economics, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge Edwards, Robert Haas; professor of neurology and physiology, University of California, San Francisco Firestone, Mary K.; professor and associate dean of instruction and student affairs, department of environmental science policy and management, University of California, Berkeley Fischhoff, Baruch; Howard Heinz University Professor, department of social and decision sciences and department of engineering and public policy, Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh Ginty, David D.; investigator, Howard Hughes Medical Institute; and Edward R. and Anne G. Lefler Professor of Neurobiology, department of neurobiology, Harvard Medical School, Boston Glass, Christopher K.; professor of cellular and molecular medicine and professor of medicine, University of California, San Diego Goldman, Yale E.; professor, department of physiology, Pennsylvania Muscle Institute, University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine, Philadelphia González, Gabriela; spokesperson, LIGO Scientific Collaboration; and professor, department of physics and astronomy, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge Hagan, John L.; John D. MacArthur Professor of Sociology and Law, department of sociology, Northwestern University, Evanston, Ill. Hatten, Mary E.; Frederick P. Rose Professor, laboratory of developmental neurobiology, The Rockefeller University, New York City Hebard, Arthur F.; distinguished professor of physics, department of physics, University of Florida, Gainesville Jensen, Klavs F.; Warren K. Lewis Professor of Chemical Engineering and professor of materials science and engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge Kahn, Barbara B.; vice chair for research strategy and George R. Minot Professor of Medicine at Harvard Medical School, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston Kinder, Donald R.; Philip E. Converse Collegiate Professor of Political Science and Psychology and research scientist, department of political science, Center for Political Studies, Institute for Social Research, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor Lazar, Mitchell A.; Willard and Rhoda Ware Professor in Diabetes and Metabolic Diseases, and director, Institute for Diabetes, Obesity, and Metabolism, University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine, Philadelphia Locksley, Richard M.; investigator, Howard Hughes Medical Institute; and professor, department of medicine (infectious diseases), and Marion and Herbert Sandler Distinguished Professorship in Asthma Research, University of California, San Francisco Lozano, Guillermina; professor and chair, department of genetics, The University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston Mavalvala, Nergis; Curtis and Kathleen Marble Professor of Astrophysics and associate head, department of physics, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge Moore, Jeffrey Scott; Murchison-Mallory Professor of Chemistry, department of chemistry, University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign Moore, Melissa J.; chief scientific officer, mRNA Research Platform, Moderna Therapeutics, Cambridge, Mass.; and Eleanor Eustis Farrington Chair of Cancer Research Professor, RNA Therapeutics Institute, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester Nunnari, Jodi M.; professor, department of molecular and cellular biology, University of California, Davis O'Farrell, Patrick H.; professor of biochemistry and biophysics, department of biochemistry and biophysics, University of California, San Francisco Ort, Donald R.; research leader and Robert Emerson Professor, USDA/ARS Global Change and Photosynthesis Research Unit, departments of plant biology and crop sciences, University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign Parker, Gary; professor, department of civil and environmental engineering and department of geology, University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign Patapoutian, Ardem; investigator, Howard Hughes Medical Institute; and professor, department of molecular and cellular neuroscience, The Scripps Research Institute, La Jolla, Calif. Pellegrini, Claudio; distinguished professor emeritus, department of physics and astronomy, University of California, Los Angeles Pikaard, Craig, S.; investigator, Howard Hughes Medical Institute and Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation; and distinguished professor of biology and molecular and cellular biochemistry, department of biology, Indiana University, Bloomington Read, Nicholas; Henry Ford II Professor of Physics and professor of applied physics and mathematics, Yale University, New Haven, Conn. Roediger, Henry L.; James S. McDonnell Distinguished and University Professor of Psychology, department of psychology and brain sciences, Washington University, St. Louis Rosenzweig, Amy C.; Weinberg Family Distinguished Professor of Life Sciences, and professor, departments of molecular biosciences and of chemistry, Northwestern University, Evanston, Ill. Seto, Karen C.; professor, Yale School of Forestry and Environmental Studies, New Haven, Conn. Seyfarth, Robert M.; professor of psychology and member of the graduate groups in anthropology and biology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia Sibley, L. David; Alan A. and Edith L. Wolff Distinguished Professor in Molecular Microbiology, department of molecular microbiology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis Spielman, Daniel A.; Henry Ford II Professor of Computer Science and Mathematics, departments of computer science and mathematics, Yale University, New Haven, Conn. Sudan, Madhu; Gordon McKay Professor of Computer Science, John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences, Harvard University, Cambridge, Mass. Tishkoff, Sarah; David and Lyn Silfen University Professor, departments of genetics and biology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia Van Essen, David C.; Alumni Professor of Neurobiology, department of anatomy and neurobiology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis Vidale, John E.; professor, department of earth and space sciences, University of Washington, Seattle Wennberg, Paul O.; R. Stanton Avery Professor of Atmospheric Chemistry and Environmental Science and Engineering, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena Wilson, Rachel I.; Martin Family Professor of Basic Research in the Field of Neurobiology, department of neurobiology, Harvard Medical School, Boston Zachos, James C.; professor, department of earth and planetary sciences, University of California, Santa Cruz, Santa Cruz Newly elected foreign associates, their affiliations at the time of election, and their country of citizenship are: Addadi, Lia; professor and Dorothy and Patrick E. Gorman Chair of Biological Ultrastructure, department of structural science, Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot, Israel (Israel/Italy) Folke, Carl; director and professor, The Beijer Institute of Ecological Economics, Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences, Stockholm, Sweden (Sweden) Freeman, Kenneth C.; Duffield Professor of Astronomy, Mount Stromlo and Siding Spring Observatories, Research School of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Australian National University, Weston Creek (Australia) Lee, Sang Yup; distinguished professor, dean, and director, department of chemical and biomolecular engineering, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejeon, South Korea (South Korea) Levitzki, Alexander; professor of biochemistry, unit of cellular signaling, department of biological chemistry, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Jerusalem (Israel) Peiris, Joseph Sriyal Malik; Tam Wah-Ching Professorship in Medical Science, School of Public Health, The University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam, Hong Kong, People's Republic of China (Sri Lanka) Robinson, Carol Vivien; Dr. Lee's Professor of Chemistry, Physical and Theoretical Chemistry Laboratory, University of Oxford, Oxford, England (United Kingdom) Thesleff, Irma; academician of science, professor, and research director, developmental biology program, Institute of Biotechnology, University of Helsinki, Helsinki (Finland) Underdal, Arild; professor of political science, department of political science, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway (Norway) The National Academy of Sciences is a private, nonprofit institution that was established under a congressional charter signed by President Abraham Lincoln in 1863. It recognizes achievement in science by election to membership, and -- with the National Academy of Engineering and the National Academy of Medicine -- provides science, engineering, and health policy advice to the federal government and other organizations.

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