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Lake of the Woods, United States

The University of Chicago

Lake of the Woods, United States
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By providing resources and research infrastructure, The Duchossois Family Institute: Harnessing the Microbiome and Immunity for Human Health will allow faculty and students to focus on preventing disease by optimizing the body's own defenses and finding new ways to maintain well-being. With the embedded expertise of the university's Polsky Center for Entrepreneurship and Innovation, they will work aggressively to bring breakthroughs to market through partnerships with industry, venture capitalists, government agencies, like-minded philanthropists, and the public. "The Duchossois Family Institute will draw on the creativity and skill of university researchers across many fields in bringing new perspectives to medical science, oriented toward making an impact that greatly benefits human lives," said University of Chicago President Robert J. Zimmer. "We are grateful for the Duchossois family's remarkable level of engagement in establishing this innovative alliance between medical experts and entrepreneurs." The amount is the largest single gift in support of UChicago Medicine and brings the family's lifetime charitable contributions to the academic medical center to $137 million. Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research has donated a total of $118 million since 2006, largely to support cancer research. The Duchossois gift is also the fourth time there has been a single gift of $100 million or more to the University of Chicago. The Thomas L. Pearson and The Pearson Family Members Foundation made a grant of $100 million in 2015 to establish The Pearson Institute for the Study and Resolution of Global Conflicts and The Pearson Global Forum at the Harris School of Public Policy, and an anonymous donor gave $100 million in 2007 to fund the Odyssey Scholarship Program in support of undergraduate student aid. The university's largest gift to date is $300 million in 2008 from investment entrepreneur David Booth, for whom UChicago's Booth School of Business is named. 'New science of wellness' Until now, much of the research on the microbiome — the community of bacteria, fungi, viruses and other microorganisms living in the body, primarily the digestive tract — and its relation to human health has focused on its relationship to disease. Recent discoveries, many at the University of Chicago, demonstrate that the genetic material encoded within the microbiome is a critical factor in fine-tuning the immune system and can be powerful in maintaining well-being and preventing disease. New computer technology to integrate and analyze vast amounts of biological and medical data — pioneered by the National Cancer Institute Genomic Data Commons, developed and operated by the university — also is allowing researchers from disparate disciplines and locations to work toward common interests and solutions. The Duchossois (pronounced DUCH-ah-swah) family wanted to support the application of these discoveries to improve health, and turned to leaders at the University of Chicago for ideas. "We wanted to find a way to be transformative in our giving and looked to the University of Chicago and asked, 'What is the nature of what's in our bodies that helps us stay well?'" said Ashley Duchossois Joyce, president of The Duchossois Family Foundation. "They came back with an answer that connected all the dots, confirming the potential for a new science of wellness that fundamentally explores how the immune system and microbiome interact." Focusing on factors crucial to maintaining wellness could greatly expand the tools available to medical researchers and entrepreneurs. Early targets identified by institute scientists envision a potential future in which: Building on strengths at UChicago The institute will build on insights already gained from research at the University of Chicago. "The family recognized the university's and medical center's leadership in genomics, the human immune system, data analytics and the microbiome," said T. Conrad Gilliam, dean for basic science in the Division of the Biological Sciences, who will lead efforts to launch the institute. "The new institute will integrate these areas into this new science focused on longstanding health and the body's natural ability to maintain wellness." The Duchossois Family Institute will support leading-edge technologies and services including: The Duchossois Family Institute's efforts will bring together investigators across the University of Chicago as well as affiliates at Argonne National Laboratory, Marine Biological Laboratory at Woods Hole, Mass., and eventually many more partners. In addition, the university will embed commercialization specialists from its Polsky Center for Entrepreneurship and Innovation within the institute to promote participation and support of the business community to further accelerate innovation. Polsky's proven expertise will ensure that the intellectual property generated is protected, licensed, and potentially spun off for business development for the benefit of participating institutions and the entire region. "Sustainability and entrepreneurship are critical to the success of this new endeavor," said Craig Duchossois, a longtime trustee of both the university and the medical center. "The fact that we are able to leverage so many resources at one university means we can aggressively advance the progress of this new science and help society." A history of giving The latest gift continues a history of giving to UChicago that spans 37 years, inspired by the care that Beverly Duchossois, late wife of Richard Duchossois, received at what was then called the University of Chicago Hospital. In 1980, Richard Duchossois established the Beverly E. Duchossois Cancer Fund in memory of his wife. In the years since, the family has given the University a total of $37 million to drive innovation and transformative care at the medical center, including a named professorship and several cancer research funds. That amount includes a $21 million gift in 1994 to establish the Duchossois Center for Advanced Medicine, which is home to outpatient specialty clinics, diagnostic centers and treatment facilities at the University of Chicago Medicine. "We are honored and privileged to be the beneficiary of such enormous generosity and are excited by what the science can accomplish," said Kenneth S. Polonsky, MD, dean of the Division of the Biological Sciences and the Pritzker School of Medicine and executive vice president of medical affairs. "The gift invests in a core strength of UChicago Medicine: our basic science research and our ability to quickly translate that research for the benefit of patients." In addition to Craig Duchossois' service as a trustee, Janet Duchossois serves as a member of the University of Chicago Women's Board. The Duchossois Family Foundation is made up of family members spanning three generations including patriarch Richard; son and daughter-in-law, Craig and Janet; daughters Kimberly Duchossois, a University of Chicago Cancer Research Foundation board member, and Dayle Fortino; and grandchildren, including Ashley Duchossois Joyce, a University of Chicago graduate and former member of the School of Social Service Administration Visiting Committee, Jessica Swoyer Green and Ilaria Woodward. About the University of Chicago Medicine The University of Chicago Medicine & Biological Sciences is one of the nation's leading academic medical institutions. It comprises the Pritzker School of Medicine, a top U.S. medical school; the University of Chicago Biomedical Sciences Division; and the University of Chicago Medical Center. Twelve Nobel Prize winners in physiology or medicine have been affiliated with the University of Chicago Medicine. Visit our research blog at sciencelife.uchospitals.edu and our newsroom at uchospitals.edu/news. About The Duchossois Family Foundation Established in 1984 by first- and second-generation family members, The Duchossois Family Foundation strives to empower individuals to enhance their quality of life through wellness and education. Visit our website at TheDFF.org. To view the original version on PR Newswire, visit:http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/100-million-gift-establishes-duchossois-family-institute-to-develop-new-science-focused-on-optimizing-health-300463229.html


News Article | February 27, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

(PRINCETON, N.J., Feb. 27, 2017) - Bristol-Myers Squibb Company (NYSE:BMY) today announced that Columbia University Medical Center and Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre (Peter Mac) have joined the International Immuno-Oncology Network (II-ON), a global peer-to-peer collaboration between Bristol-Myers Squibb and academia that aims to advance Immuno-Oncology (I-O) science and translational medicine to improve patient outcomes. Launched in 2012 by Bristol-Myers Squibb, the II-ON was one of the first networks to bring academia and industry together to further the scientific understanding of I-O, and has expanded from 10 to 15 sites including more than 250 investigators working on over 150 projects across 20 tumor types. The II-ON has generated cutting-edge I-O data that have informed the development of new I-O agents, yielded publications and produced some of the earliest findings on a variety of biomarkers and target identification and validation. "Bristol-Myers Squibb has long believed the future of cancer research is dependent on investments in science and partnerships. We formed the II-ON to facilitate innovation in I-O science and drug discovery by providing a streamlined framework for peer-to-peer collaboration among global cancer research leaders," said Nils Lonberg, Head of Oncology Biology Discovery at Bristol-Myers Squibb. "The significant discoveries generated by the II-ON over the past five years have not only informed our robust early I-O pipeline, but also serve to advance the entire field. We are proud to collaborate with Columbia University Medical Center and Peter Mac, and together with the entire II-ON will continue to lead pioneering research and heighten our collective understanding of the science behind I-O." Through the II-ON, Bristol-Myers Squibb is collaborating with leading cancer research institutions around the world to generate innovative I-O science, launch biology-driven trials and seek out cutting-edge technologies with the goal of translating research findings into clinical trials and, ultimately, clinical practice. "I-O research may be transforming the way we treat cancer," said Charles G. Drake, MD, PhD, Professor of Medicine at Columbia University Medical Center and Director of Genitourinary Oncology and Associate Director for Clinical Research at the Herbert Irving Comprehensive Cancer Center at New York-Presbyterian/Columbia. "The II-ON offers a tremendous opportunity to work smarter and faster along with our colleagues to address fundamental scientific questions in I-O." "We believe the collective knowledge and research power of the II-ON will generate groundbreaking findings in I-O with the potential to improve outcomes for people affected by cancer," said Professor Joe Trapani, Executive Director Cancer Research and Head of the Cancer Immunology Program at Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Melbourne, Australia. Building on the success of the II-ON, Bristol-Myers Squibb has invested in several other models of scientific collaboration with academic partners across the globe, including the Global Expert Centers Initiative (GECI) and the Immuno-Oncology Integrated Community Oncology Network (IO-ICON). "We believe a one-size-fits-all research approach does not facilitate innovation," said Lonberg. "Our tailored collaborations with academic centers expand our research capabilities and accelerate our collective ability to deliver potentially life-changing results for patients." The II-ON, formed in 2012, is a global peer-to-peer collaboration between Bristol-Myers Squibb and academia advancing the science of Immuno-Oncology (I-O) through a series of preclinical, translational and biology-focused research objectives. The research in the collaboration is focused on three fundamental scientific pillars: understanding the mechanisms of resistance to immunotherapy; identifying patient populations likely to benefit from immunotherapy; and exploring novel combination therapies that may enhance anti-tumor response through complementary mechanisms of action. The II-ON facilitates the translation of scientific research findings into drug discovery and development, with the goal of introducing new treatment options into clinical practice. In addition to Bristol-Myers Squibb, the II-ON currently comprises 15 leading cancer research institutions, including: Clinica Universidad Navarra, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, The Earle A. Chiles Research Institute (Providence Health & Services), Institut Gustave Roussy, Istituto Nazionale per lo Studio e la Cura dei Tumori "Fondazione G. Pascale", Bloomberg-Kimmel Institute for Cancer Immunotherapy at the Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, National Cancer Center Japan, The Netherlands Cancer Institute, The Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust and The Institute of Cancer Research, University College London, The University of Chicago, West German Cancer Center/University Hospital Essen, and now Columbia University Medical Center and Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre. Bristol-Myers Squibb: At the Forefront of Immuno-Oncology Science & Innovation At Bristol-Myers Squibb, patients are at the center of everything we do. Our vision for the future of cancer care is focused on researching and developing transformational Immuno-Oncology (I-O) medicines that will raise survival expectations in hard-to-treat cancers and will change the way patients live with cancer. We are leading the scientific understanding of I-O through our extensive portfolio of investigational and approved agents - including the first combination of two I-O agents in metastatic melanoma - and our differentiated clinical development program, which is studying broad patient populations across more than 20 types of cancers with 12 clinical-stage molecules designed to target different immune system pathways. Our deep expertise and innovative clinical trial designs uniquely position us to advance the science of combinations across multiple tumors and potentially deliver the next wave of I-O combination regimens with a sense of urgency. We also continue to pioneer research that will help facilitate a deeper understanding of the role of immune biomarkers and inform which patients will benefit most from I-O therapies. We understand making the promise of I-O a reality for the many patients who may benefit from these therapies requires not only innovation on our part, but also close collaboration with leading experts in the field. Our partnerships with academia, government, advocacy and biotech companies support our collective goal of providing new treatment options to advance the standards of clinical practice. Bristol-Myers Squibb is a global biopharmaceutical company whose mission is to discover, develop and deliver innovative medicines that help patients prevail over serious diseases. For more information about Bristol-Myers Squibb, visit us at BMS.com or follow us on LinkedIn, Twitter, YouTube and Facebook. This press release contains "forward-looking statements" as that term is defined in the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995 regarding the research, development and commercialization of pharmaceutical products. Such forward-looking statements are based on current expectations and involve inherent risks and uncertainties, including factors that could delay, divert or change any of them, and could cause actual outcomes and results to differ materially from current expectations. No forward-looking statement can be guaranteed. Forward-looking statements in this press release should be evaluated together with the many uncertainties that affect Bristol-Myers Squibb's business, particularly those identified in the cautionary factors discussion in Bristol-Myers Squibb's Annual Report on Form 10-K for the year ended December 31, 2016 in our Quarterly Reports on Form 10-Q and our Current Reports on Form 8-K. Bristol-Myers Squibb undertakes no obligation to publicly update any forward-looking statement, whether as a result of new information, future events or otherwise.


News Article | May 25, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has granted authorization for a magnetic device used to treat pediatric esophageal atresia, a birth defect that causes abnormal formation of the esophagus. The Flourish™ Pediatric Esophageal Atresia device was created by University of Chicago Medicine assistant professor of radiology Mario Zaritzky, MD, in collaboration with Cook Medical. Esophageal atresia is a birth defect of the esophagus that affects about 1 in 2,500 to 4,000 births per year. Children with the malformation have a gap in their esophagus that prevents them from properly ingesting food. Surgery has traditionally been the only treatment option to repair the malformation until Zaritzky, a pediatric radiologist at the University of Chicago Medicine Comer Children's Hospital, collaborated with Cook on the development of a minimally invasive, magnet-based approach. The new device uses rare earth magnets that are inserted into the upper and lower ends of an infant's esophagus. The procedure doesn't require any major incisions. Over the course of several days, the magnets gradually stretch both ends of the esophagus. Eventually, the ends of the esophagusconnect to form an intact esophagus. So far, 16 patients have been successfully treated with the device. "The idea was to create a minimally invasive procedure that could possibly be an alternative to surgery in selective pediatric cases," said Zaritzky. "Any procedure that can potentially replace major thoracic surgery with a less invasive method should be considered before deciding to go to the operating room." The Flourish Pediatric Esophageal Atresia Device received a special Humanitarian Use Device designation last week after being reviewed through the FDA's Humanitarian Device Exemption pathway. The designation is used for medical devices that treat or diagnose rare diseases or conditions that affect fewer than 4,000 people in the U.S. each year. "We're very excited that FDA has acknowledged the importance of Flourish as a minimally invasive alternative for pediatric patients with esophageal atresia," said Barry Slowey, president and global business unit leader for Cook Medical's Endoscopy business unit. "This technology has the ability to provide a different approach to treatment for those infants who suffer from this condition, as well as for their parents and families." The FDA's approval means more children born with the malformation will have access to a minimally invasive option and be able to avoid surgery. About the University of Chicago Medicine & Biological Sciences The University of Chicago Medicine, with a history dating back to 1927, is one of the nation's leading academic medical institutions. It comprises the Medical Center, Pritzker School of Medicine and the Biological Sciences Division. Its main Hyde Park campus is home to the Center for Care and Discovery, Bernard Mitchell Hospital, Comer Children's Hospital and the Duchossois Center for Advanced Medicine. It also has a 108,000-square-foot facility in Orland Park as well as affiliations and partnerships that create a regional network of doctors in dozens of Chicago-area communities. UChicago Medicine offers a full range of specialty-care services for adults and children through more than 40 institutes and centers including an NCI-designated Comprehensive Cancer Center. It has 805 licensed beds, nearly 850 attending physicians, about 2,500 nurses and over 1,100 residents and fellows. Harvey-based Ingalls Health joined UChicago Medicine's network in 2016. Visit our research blog at sciencelife.uchospitals.edu and our newsroom at uchospitals.edu/news.


A Chicago-area family with a deep commitment to supporting science and medicine is giving $100 million to establish The Duchossois Family Institute at the University of Chicago Medicine, which seeks to accelerate research and interventions based on how the human immune system, microbiome and genetics interact to maintain health. The gift from The Duchossois Group Inc. Chairman and CEO Craig Duchossois, his wife, Janet Duchossois, and The Duchossois Family Foundation will support development of a "new science of wellness" aimed at preserving health and complementing medicine's traditional focus on disease treatment. Their investment will help build an entrepreneurial infrastructure that stimulates research, data integration, and clinical applications, while educating the next generation of young physicians and students in this new science. By providing resources and research infrastructure, The Duchossois Family Institute: Harnessing the Microbiome and Immunity for Human Health will allow faculty and students to focus on preventing disease by optimizing the body's own defenses and finding new ways to maintain well-being. With the embedded expertise of the university's Polsky Center for Entrepreneurship and Innovation, they will work aggressively to bring breakthroughs to market through partnerships with industry, venture capitalists, government agencies, like-minded philanthropists, and the public. "The Duchossois Family Institute will draw on the creativity and skill of university researchers across many fields in bringing new perspectives to medical science, oriented toward making an impact that greatly benefits human lives," said University of Chicago President Robert J. Zimmer. "We are grateful for the Duchossois family's remarkable level of engagement in establishing this innovative alliance between medical experts and entrepreneurs." The amount is the largest single gift in support of UChicago Medicine and brings the family's lifetime charitable contributions to the academic medical center to $137 million. Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research has donated a total of $118 million since 2006, largely to support cancer research. The Duchossois gift is also the fourth time there has been a single gift of $100 million or more to the University of Chicago. The Thomas L. Pearson and The Pearson Family Members Foundation made a grant of $100 million in 2015 to establish The Pearson Institute for the Study and Resolution of Global Conflicts and The Pearson Global Forum at the Harris School of Public Policy, and an anonymous donor gave $100 million in 2007 to fund the Odyssey Scholarship Program in support of undergraduate student aid. The university's largest gift to date is $300 million in 2008 from investment entrepreneur David Booth, for whom UChicago's Booth School of Business is named. Until now, much of the research on the microbiome -- the community of bacteria, fungi, viruses and other microorganisms living in the body, primarily the digestive tract -- and its relation to human health has focused on its relationship to disease. Recent discoveries, many at the University of Chicago, demonstrate that the genetic material encoded within the microbiome is a critical factor in fine-tuning the immune system and can be powerful in maintaining well-being and preventing disease. New computer technology to integrate and analyze vast amounts of biological and medical data -- pioneered by the National Cancer Institute Genomic Data Commons, developed and operated by the university -- also is allowing researchers from disparate disciplines and locations to work toward common interests and solutions. The Duchossois (pronounced DUCH-ah-swah) family wanted to support the application of these discoveries to improve health, and turned to leaders at the University of Chicago for ideas. "We wanted to find a way to be transformative in our giving and looked to the University of Chicago and asked, 'What is the nature of what's in our bodies that helps us stay well?'" said Ashley Duchossois Joyce, president of The Duchossois Family Foundation. "They came back with an answer that connected all the dots, confirming the potential for a new science of wellness that fundamentally explores how the immune system and microbiome interact." Focusing on factors crucial to maintaining wellness could greatly expand the tools available to medical researchers and entrepreneurs. Early targets identified by institute scientists envision a potential future in which: The institute will build on insights already gained from research at the University of Chicago. "The family recognized the university's and medical center's leadership in genomics, the human immune system, data analytics and the microbiome," said T. Conrad Gilliam, dean for basic science in the Division of the Biological Sciences, who will lead efforts to launch the institute. "The new institute will integrate these areas into this new science focused on longstanding health and the body's natural ability to maintain wellness." The Duchossois Family Institute will support leading-edge technologies and services including: The Duchossois Family Institute's efforts will bring together investigators across the University of Chicago as well as affiliates at Argonne National Laboratory, Marine Biological Laboratory at Woods Hole, Mass., and eventually many more partners. In addition, the university will embed commercialization specialists from its Polsky Center for Entrepreneurship and Innovation within the institute to promote participation and support of the business community to further accelerate innovation. Polsky's proven expertise will ensure that the intellectual property generated is protected, licensed, and potentially spun off for business development for the benefit of participating institutions and the entire region. "Sustainability and entrepreneurship are critical to the success of this new endeavor," said Craig Duchossois, a longtime trustee of both the university and the medical center. "The fact that we are able to leverage so many resources at one university means we can aggressively advance the progress of this new science and help society." The latest gift continues a history of giving to UChicago that spans 37 years, inspired by the care that Beverly Duchossois, late wife of Richard Duchossois, received at what was then called the University of Chicago Hospital. In 1980, Richard Duchossois established the Beverly E. Duchossois Cancer Fund in memory of his wife. In the years since, the family has given the University a total of $37 million to drive innovation and transformative care at the medical center, including a named professorship and several cancer research funds. That amount includes a $21 million gift in 1994 to establish the Duchossois Center for Advanced Medicine, which is home to outpatient specialty clinics, diagnostic centers and treatment facilities at the University of Chicago Medicine. "We are honored and privileged to be the beneficiary of such enormous generosity and are excited by what the science can accomplish," said Kenneth S. Polonsky, MD, dean of the Division of the Biological Sciences and the Pritzker School of Medicine and executive vice president of medical affairs. "The gift invests in a core strength of UChicago Medicine: our basic science research and our ability to quickly translate that research for the benefit of patients." In addition to Craig Duchossois' service as a trustee, Janet Duchossois serves as a member of the University of Chicago Women's Board. The Duchossois Family Foundation is made up of family members spanning three generations including patriarch Richard; son and daughter-in-law, Craig and Janet; daughters Kimberly Duchossois, a University of Chicago Cancer Research Foundation board member, and Dayle Fortino; and grandchildren, including Ashley Duchossois Joyce, a University of Chicago graduate and former member of the School of Social Service Administration Visiting Committee, Jessica Swoyer Green and Ilaria Woodward. About the University of Chicago Medicine The University of Chicago Medicine & Biological Sciences is one of the nation's leading academic medical institutions. It comprises the Pritzker School of Medicine, a top U.S. medical school; the University of Chicago Biomedical Sciences Division; and the University of Chicago Medical Center. Twelve Nobel Prize winners in physiology or medicine have been affiliated with the University of Chicago Medicine. Visit our research blog at sciencelife.uchospitals.edu and our newsroom at uchospitals.edu/news. Established in 1984 by first- and second-generation family members, The Duchossois Family Foundation strives to empower individuals to enhance their quality of life through wellness and education. Visit our website at TheDFF.org.


News Article | May 10, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

Digital marketers have a new way to prove their professional competency and employers have a way to ensure they’re hiring the best candidates. The American Marketing Association (AMA) and LinkedIn Learning have joined forces to create a professional certification program that ensures digital marketers have command of all the relevant skills needed for success in today’s dynamic environment. Digital marketers can assess their skills by taking the AMA’s free practice exam. They can then take courses on LinkedIn Learning’s AMA-approved Learning Path which contains 20 updated online courses taught by top industry thought leaders and innovators. The subjects cover everything digital marketers need to know: analytics, SEO, email marketing, content marketing, UX and online advertising. After completing these courses, digital marketers can take the AMA Professional Certified Marketer, Digital Marketing exam. This thorough exam lasts two hours and contains 120 questions. Upon passing, marketers receive their PCM®, Digital Marketing Certification which lasts for three years. “As a nonprofit organization, the AMA has 80 years of credibility, trust, objectivity, neutrality; its standing as the go-to authority on marketing is unassailable.” remarked AMA CEO Russ Klein. “LinkedIn Learning is an excellent partner for the AMA because of its industry-leading curriculum and unparalleled reach and reputation among those in the marketing community.” "With the launch of this new AMA Learning Path, we look forward to helping marketers across the globe acquire the skills they need to earn their PCM®, Digital Marketing Certifications," said Tanya Staples, Senior Director of Content and Development at LinkedIn Learning. "We aim for this partnership to have a truly meaningful impact on the career trajectories of these professionals." AMA Digital Marketing Certification Task Force Chair, Dr. Vanitha Swaminathan, Thomas Marshall Professor of Marketing, at the Katz School of Business at University of Pittsburgh remarked, “We have leveraged the cutting-edge digital marketing tools behind the scenes to ensure we have a relevant, contemporary certification program that will be of value in the marketplace. I truly believe that AMA should be at the forefront of transforming the role of marketing as a highly strategic, analytical, and skills-based discipline. I truly believe that the certification is one concrete step to shift the field in the right direction.” AMA Digital Marketing Certification Task Force member Andy Crestodina, Strategic Director of Orbit Media Studios added, “Employers want to feel confident that when they hire a digital marketer, they can perform. Achieving this certification will ensure someone has the skill set to make a meaningful contribution to a business.” Task Force member Melissa G. Wilson from Networlding Publishing added, “This curriculum has more than 40 hours of instruction. These are difficult courses, but it’s material digital marketers need to know.” Task Force member Pat Swindle from Havas Worldwide and The University of Chicago said, “As digital marketing evolves, this program will change. We have the people, processes and passion to ensure the AMA Professional Certified Marketer, Digital Marketing Program will be a gold standard for digital marketers. And in LinkedIn Learning, they have a superior way to keep their skills on the cutting edge.” To learn more about AMA Professional Certified Marketer, Digital Marketing program, visit AMA.org or @AMA_Marketing. About American Marketing Association (AMA) The AMA is trusted by nearly a million marketing and sales professionals a year worldwide. It has more than 70 professional chapters and over 350 collegiate chapters throughout North America and select international locations. The American Marketing Association (AMA) is the largest marketing association in the world. AMA serves organizations and individuals who practice, teach and study marketing across the globe.  It serves as a forum for connecting like-minded individuals to foster knowledge sharing and relationship building; to be a trusted resource for marketing information, tools, education and training; and to advance marketing practice and thought leadership. For more information about the AMA, visit http://www.ama.org or follow the latest AMA news at @AMA_Marketing.


Imagine waiting months for a colorectal cancer screening, only for the appointment to fall between the cracks because of poor communication or, worse, being diagnosed with more advanced disease because of a long delay or lack of access to health care. Unfortunately, vulnerable minority populations on Chicago's South Side, in Cook County and beyond face these problems routinely. As a result, many people suffer unnecessarily from colorectal cancer. The University of Chicago Medicine is hoping to lead the way in addressing this issue through ILColonCARES.org, a new website being launched as part of an innovative partnership designed to help health care providers directly schedule colorectal cancer screenings for Cook County residents ages 50 to 75. The web portal, known as Illinois Colon CARES, also seeks to enhance communication across health systems and provide timely results to patients and their doctors. Inaugural partners for the initiative, in addition to UChicago Medicine, include Rush University Medical Center, Heartland Health Centers, Community Health, Friend Family Health, Asian Human Services Family Health Center, and Swedish Covenant Hospital. They are donating a total of nearly 100 screenings for the launch. The potential to expand and scale this model across the state will reach 6,000 a year. The portal will be unveiled Friday, May 12, 2017, at the Midwest Health Equity Conference in Chicago. The conference brings together community and health professionals who are focused on preventing hepatitis, liver cancer and colorectal cancer among minority populations. In its initial stages, Illinois Colon CARES (Colorectal Cancer Alliance to Reinforce and Enhance Screening) will target uninsured and vulnerable populations who are most at risk for developing the disease. The Center for Asian Health Equity (CAHE), which received a $3.5 million federal grant to increase colorectal cancer screening rates in Cook County, wants to bring the technology to other communities across the country. "If we find colon cancer early, nine out of 10 people will have a long-term survival and can be cured from the disease," said Karen Kim, MD, professor of medicine and director of CAHE, a partnership between UChicago Medicine and the Asian Health Coalition. "Unfortunately, about 40 percent of people diagnosed with colon cancer are found in late stages when the survival rate is very low. This is a disease that needs special attention because we can prevent it with screening." Fewer than half of Illinois residents who should be screened for colorectal cancer have access to such services. The tragedy of this situation is that, unlike most cancers, colorectal cancer often starts as a benign growth that can be identified and removed during screening, before cancer forms. Most federally funded health clinics provide screening to patients. However, when there is a positive result, it is very difficult to access timely and high-quality colonoscopy follow-up. Illinois Colon CARES was developed to address this gap in services, especially for vulnerable populations who are at high risk for colorectal cancer. "Federally qualified health centers are faced with challenges in communicating with hospital systems that do not shared similar electronic medical record platforms," Kim said. This portal creates a process to eliminate these gaps in needed services and follow-up care by partnering with hospitals to donate colonoscopy services for use by health centers through a single accessible, online portal. "The beauty of Illinois Colon CARES is the broad partnership and win-win-win situation. Hospitals provide community benefit to their surrounding community, federally qualified health centers have access to needed services and the community gets screened," Kim said. Kim said she hopes the effort will eventually provide access to care for vulnerable populations in every state. She has already introduced the model to colleagues across the nation, including Dennis Ahnen, MD, professor of medicine at the University of Colorado, Denver, and steering committee member of the National Colorectal Cancer Roundtable. "The Illinois Colon CARES website is both novel and an elegant way to bring hospitals and practices who wanted to reach out to the community to a population in need of that outreach," said Ahnen. "The website and the work behind it have made it easy for the hospitals and the clinics taking care of the population in need to get colonoscopies completed and provides a simple and consistent source of donated colonoscopies."


Strauss B.S.,The University of Chicago
Genetics | Year: 2017

Max Delbrück was trained as a physicist but made his major contribution in biology and ultimately shared a Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine. He was the acknowledged leader of the founders of molecular biology, yet he failed to achieve his key scientific goals. His ultimate scientific aim was to find evidence for physical laws unique to biology: so-called “complementarity.” He never did. The specific problem he initially wanted to solve was the nature of biological replication but the discovery of the mechanism of replication was made by others, in large part because of his disdain for the details of biochemistry. His later career was spent investigating the effect of light on the fungus Phycomyces, a topic that turned out to be of limited general interest. He was known both for his informality but also for his legendary displays of devastating criticism. His life and that of some of his closest colleagues was acted out against a background of a world in conflict. This essay describes the man and his career and searches for an explanation of his profound influence. © 2017 by the Genetics Society of America.


News Article | February 22, 2017
Site: www.marketwired.com

TUCSON, AZ--(Marketwired - February 22, 2017) - The Tucson Museum of Art and Historic Block is pleased to announce the launch of a naming opportunity initiative with its first major gift in the program, $500,000 to name a new feature exhibition gallery the James J. and Louise R. Glasser Gallery. The announcement also signals the beginning of the largest renovation of the Museum campus since 2000 in conjunction with a reinstallation of the Museum's exhibits. The renovation is scheduled to take place through the summer of 2017 and will include the Main Building, the John K. Goodman Pavilion, and the Moore Courtyard. A celebration of the renovation and reinstallation will be held in mid-October. "The Tucson Museum of Art and Historic Block is reinventing the way it looks as a nearly century-old organization," said TMA CEO Jeremy Mikolajczak. "As we embark on this new venture, it is through the vision and support of Jim and Louise Glasser that we can advance our mission and access, and enhance the visitor experience. This gift will allow us to completely transform the way we install and present feature exhibitions." The Glassers have a long history of philanthropy in Tucson and their native Chicago where they have been actively involved in the Tucson Museum of Art, Tucson Symphony Orchestra, University of Arizona, Sonoran Institute, Women's Foundation of Southern Arizona, Community Foundation for Southern Arizona, Rehabilitation Institute of Chicago, The Art Institute of Chicago, The University of Chicago, Lake Forest Hospital, and Chicago Botanic Garden. "The arts have been significant to our family, and a shared passion for Louise and me," said James Glasser. "We believe art is education and inspiration. In making this gift, it is our desire to help expand the wonderful experiences the Museum provides as a cultural asset to our community." This is the Glasser's second major gift to TMA. They endowed the curator position for the Art of the American West collection in 2011. James Glasser has served on the Museum's Board of Trustee's since 2006. "As friends of the museum, Louise and I have seen thousands of children and adults engage with art and each other," Mr. Glasser said. "It makes us happy to be able to express our commitment to the Museum and help expand upon the role it plays in our community." The naming opportunity is one of several available in an effort to raise funds for renovation of the entire TMA campus, and to build an endowment for the Museum, Mikolajczak said. Opportunities are available from $100,000 to name galleries and other facilities such as the Museum Store. "Our Museum impacts more than 125,000 people each year through admissions, education programs, outreach and community events," Mikolajczak said. "TMA is a historic and integral part of the fabric of Tucson and we want to ensure its long-term sustainability." The Museum will remain open during the summer renovation and reinstallation of the exhibits, offering extended programs focusing on the historic properties around the campus at 140 N. Main Ave. The Museum will offer free admission from July 9 through October 20. The John K. Goodman Pavilion will reopen in September in coordination with Museum's popular admission - free program - Second SundAZe @ TMA: Presented by The Stonewall Foundation. In addition to this summer's renovation, the long-term renovation plan includes relocation of the Museum Store, expanding collection galleries, expanding TMALearn's "Creative Space," an interactive family education center, reopening of the Museum's Main Avenue entrance, and new access between the Main Museum Building and the Goodman Pavilion. The Museum is located at 140 N. Main Avenue in historic downtown Tucson at the crossroads of West Alameda Street and North Main Avenue. Parking is free in the Museum's lot on West Washington Street. Free First Thursday: Play! Happy Hours @ TMA: 5:00 - 8:00 p.m. Free admission for all, make, drink, and explore. Second SundAZe @ TMA: 12:00 - 5:00 p.m. Free admission for Arizona and Sonora, Mexico residents every second Sunday of the month, including Picture This! Art for Families activities: 1:00 - 3:00 p.m., music and photo booth. Fun for all ages. Adults, $12; Senior (65+), $10; Student (with college ID), $7; Youth (13-17), $7; Child (12 and under), free; Veteran with ID, free; Museum Member, Free. About the Tucson Museum of Art and Historic Block The Tucson Museum of Art and Historic Block's mission is Connecting Art to Life. The Museum was founded 1924 in the El Presidio Historic District of downtown Tucson. It is Southern Arizona's premier presenter of fine art and art education programs. The Museum features permanent and traveling exhibitions of Modern and Contemporary, Native American, American West, Latin American, and Asian art. The 74,000 square foot Museum offers guided tours, education programs, and studio art classes in a contemporary building. The Museum's Historic Block of 19th and 20th C. adobe and Mission Revival-style buildings, encompassing an entire four-acre city block, includes the John K. Goodman Pavilion of Western Art, displaying the Museum's notable art of the American West collection, the highly acclaimed Museum restaurant Café a la C'Art, and additional exhibition and studio spaces. For more information, please visit www.TucsonMuseumofArt.org or call (520) 624-2333. Follow the latest events on Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter. TMA is a private 501(c)(3) charitable arts and education organization.


News Article | February 21, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

New research from The University of Texas at Austin reveals that the Earth's unique iron composition isn't linked to the formation of the planet's core, calling into question a prevailing theory about the events that shaped our planet during its earliest years. The research, published in Nature Communications on Feb. 20, opens the door for other competing theories about why the Earth, relative to other planets, has higher levels of heavy iron isotopes. Among them: light iron isotopes may have been vaporized into space by a large impact with another planet that formed the moon; the slow churning of the mantle as it makes and recycles the Earth's crust may preferentially incorporate heavy iron into rock; or, the composition of the raw material that formed the planet in its earliest days may have been enriched with heavy iron. An isotope is a variety of atom that has a different weight from other atoms of the same element because it has a different numbers of neutrons. "The Earth's core formation was probably the biggest event affecting Earth's history. Materials that make up the whole Earth were melted and differentiated," said Jung-Fu Lin, a professor at the UT Jackson School of Geosciences and one of the study's authors. "But in this study, we say that there must be other origins for Earth's iron isotope anomaly." Jin Liu, now a postdoctoral researcher at Stanford University, led the research while earning his Ph.D. at the Jackson School. Collaborators include scientists from The University of Chicago, Sorbonne Universities in France, Argonne National Laboratory, the Center for High Pressure Science and Advanced Technology Research in China, and the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. Rock samples from other planetary bodies and objects--ranging from the moon, to Mars, to ancient meteorites called chondrites--all share about the same ratio of heavy to light iron isotopes. In comparison to these samples from space, rocks from Earth have about 0.01 percent more heavy iron isotopes than light isotopes. That might not sound like much, but Lin said it's significant enough to make the Earth's iron composition unique among known worlds. "This 0.01 percent anomaly is very significant compared with, say, chondrites," Lin said. "This significant difference thus represents a different source or origin of our planet." Lin said that one of the most popular theories to explain the Earth's iron signature is that the relatively large size of the planet (compared with other rocky bodies in the solar system) created high pressure and high temperature conditions during core formation that made different proportions of heavy and light iron isotopes accumulate in the core and mantle. This resulted in a larger share of heavy iron isotopes bonding with elements that make up the rocky mantle, while lighter iron isotopes bonded together and with other trace metals to form the Earth's core. But when the research team used a diamond anvil to subject small samples of metal alloys and silicate rocks to core formation pressures, they not only found that the iron isotopes stayed put, but that the bonds between iron and other elements got stronger. Instead of breaking and rebonding with common mantle or core elements, the initial bond configuration got sturdier. "Our high pressure studies find that iron isotopic fractionation between silicate mantle and metal core is minimal," said Liu, the lead author. Co-author Nicolas Dauphas, a professor at the University of Chicago, emphasized that analyzing the atomic scale measurements was a feat unto itself. "One has to use sophisticated mathematical techniques to make sense of the measurements," he said. "It took a dream team to pull this off." Helen Williams, a geology lecturer at the University of Cambridge, said it's difficult to know the physical conditions of Earth's core formation, but that the high pressures in the experiment make for a more realistic simulation. "This is a really elegant study using a highly novel approach that confirms older experimental results and extends them to much higher pressures appropriate to the likely conditions of core-mantle equilibrium on Earth," Williams said. Lin said it will take more research to uncover the reason for the Earth's unique iron signature, and that experiments that approximate early conditions on Earth will play a key role because rocks from the core are impossible to attain. The research was funded by the National Science Foundation, the Center for High Pressure Science and Technology Advanced Research, NASA, the French National Research Agency, and the Consortium for Materials Properties Research in Earth Sciences.


News Article | February 22, 2017
Site: co.newswire.com

The Luzzatto Company, Inc. (TLC), a Santa Monica-based real estate investment firm, announced that Asher Luzzatto has joined the firm as Vice President & General Counsel. In his new role, Luzzatto will focus on all aspects of TLC operations, including acquisitions, investor relations, asset management, financing, and development. He will also oversee all of TLC’s in-house legal work. Prior to joining TLC, Mr. Luzzatto was an attorney at Pircher, Nichols & Meeks, one of the premiere real estate law firms in the United States. His practice focused on complex real estate transactions, with an emphasis on the representation of private equity funds and other institutional investors in the acquisition, disposition, financing and leasing of commercial real estate assets. Mr. Luzzatto is also the owner and founder of Hyperslow, a wellness complex in Miracle Mile. Mr. Luzzatto has a B.A. from University of California, Los Angeles and a J.D. from The University of Chicago Law School. “We’re delighted welcome Asher to our team,” said Marc Luzzatto, President of TLC. “He’s ready to make an immediate impact in our office and drive the firm forward as we look to accelerate the pace of our acquisitions and continue our legacy of generating above-market returns on our investments.” TLC is a Santa Monica, Calif. private equity firm that invests nationwide in real estate and real estate-related debt with existing investments in ten states. TLC acquires properties through its equity fund as well as through existing ventures and partnerships with high net worth individuals and institutional investors.  For more information, please visit:  www.luzzattocompany.com.

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