of California, California, United States
of California, California, United States

Time filter

Source Type

News Article | February 15, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

Researchers find that the fault has a staircase-like structure, which would result in stronger shaking and more damage during an earthquake RIVERSIDE, Calif. -- A new study by a team of researchers, including one from the University of California, Riverside, found that the fault under Ventura, Calif., would likely cause stronger shaking during an earthquake and more damage than previously suspected. The Ventura-Pitas Point fault in southern California has been the focus of a lot of recent attention because it is thought to be capable of magnitude 8 earthquakes. It underlies the city of Ventura and runs offshore, and thus may be capable of generating tsunamis. Since it was identified as an active and potentially dangerous fault in the late 1980s, there has been a controversy about its location and geometry underground, with two competing models. Originally, researchers assumed the fault was planar and steeply dipping, like a sheet of plywood positioned against a house, to a depth of about 13 miles. But a more recent study, published in 2014, suggested the fault had a "ramp-flat geometry," with a flat section between two tilting sections, similar to a portion of a staircase. In a recently published paper in Geophysical Research Letters, a team of researchers used computer modeling to test the two alternatives. In these computer models, the crust -- outermost layer of rock -- in the Ventura-Santa Barbara region is represented as a three-dimensional volume, with the surfaces of the region's faults as weaknesses within it. That volume is then "squeezed" at the rate and direction that the region is being squeezed by plate tectonics. In comparisons of the expected movement in the models with GPS data, the fault with the staircase-like structure was favored. That means more of the fault, which runs westward 60 miles from the city of Ventura, through the Santa Barbara Channel, and beneath the cities of Santa Barbara and Goleta, is closer to the surface. That would likely cause stronger shaking during an earthquake and more damage. "Our models confirm that the Ventura-Pitas Point fault is a major fault, that lies flat under much of the coast between Ventura and Santa Barbara," said Gareth Funning, an associate professor of geophysics at UC Riverside, one of the authors of the study. "This means that a potential source of large earthquakes is just a few miles beneath the ground in those cities. We would expect very strong shaking if one occurred." Future research will address the consequences of there being a fault ramp under Ventura. Researchers now can run more accurate simulations based on the ramp model to predict where the shaking will be strongest, and whether they would expect a tsunami. The paper is called "Mechanical models favor a ramp geometry for the Ventura-Pitas Point fault, California." In addition to Funning, the authors are: Scott Marshall and Hannah E. Krueger, both of Appalachian State University; Susan Owen, at the NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory; and John Loveless at Smith College. The University of California, Riverside is a doctoral research university, a living laboratory for groundbreaking exploration of issues critical to Inland Southern California, the state and communities around the world. Reflecting California's diverse culture, UCR's enrollment is now nearly 23,000 students. The campus opened a medical school in 2013 and has reached the heart of the Coachella Valley by way of the UCR Palm Desert Center. The campus has an annual statewide economic impact of more than $1 billion. A broadcast studio with fiber cable to the AT&T Hollywood hub is available for live or taped interviews. UCR also has ISDN for radio interviews. To learn more, call (951) UCR-NEWS.


News Article | February 21, 2017
Site: co.newswire.com

As part of the dermMentors™ Resident of Distinction Award program, sponsored by Beiersdorf Inc., five dermatology residents attended the 16th Annual Caribbean Dermatology Symposium, held in Aruba, Netherlands Antilles, from January 17 - 21, 2017.   The dermMentors™ Resident of Distinction awardees – Sean Condon, MD, of the Cleveland Clinic, Brienne Cressey, MD, of New York-Presbyterian Weill Cornell Medical College, Daniel Opel, MD, of Loyola University Chicago, Eric Sorenson, MD, of The University of California-Los Angeles, and Valerie Yanofsky, MD of the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai – attended the Caribbean Dermatology Symposium scientific sessions as well as networking events with top thought leaders in dermatology. The residents presented new scientific research during an independent mentoring session which was held on Friday, January 20. Valerie Yanofsky, MD, a third-year resident in dermatology at The Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, was awarded the overall grand prize for her presentation, entitled: “Cyclosporine A Polarizes T Cells toward T22 and Induces IL-22 Receptor in Human SCC Cells in vitro: A Mechanism Driving IL-22 Induced SCC Proliferation.” DermMentors.org and the dermMentors™ Resident of Distinction Award program are sponsored by Beiersdorf Inc., makers of Eucerin and Aquaphor, and administered by DermEd, Inc. Now in its 7th year, The dermMentors™ Resident of Distinction Award has recognized top residents in dermatology with a sponsorship to attend the Caribbean Dermatology Symposium and the Coastal Dermatology Symposium, and offers selected residents Virtual Mentorship and Mentor Meet-up award opportunities. The dermMentors.org website is dedicated to helping residents during their training and throughout their careers, by providing insights from respected thought leaders, and facilitating and fostering relationships between residents and mentors in dermatology. For more information, visit www.dermMentors.org, or contact Evince Communications at (203) 354-6953​


News Article | February 21, 2017
Site: www.csmonitor.com

A combination photograph shows the beginning (top L) to the end (top L to bottom R) of a total solar eclipse as seen from the beach of Ternate island, Indonesia, on March 9, 2016. —Do you want to be a filmmaking star? Or at least make a film of a star? The University of California needs your help. As the clock ticks closer to this summer’s total solar eclipse, UC Berkeley and Google are partnering to carry out what they're calling the Eclipse Megamovie Project. By combining footage from over 1,000 cameras in the path of the eclipse, they hope to create a 90-minute “megamovie” that captures the phenomenon in a way no human being could alone. When the moon passes directly between the Earth and the sun on August 21, the center of its shadow will trace out a diagonal trail from Oregon to South Carolina. Observers located at the exact center of this “path of totality” may be able to see the total eclipse for as long as 2 minutes and 40 seconds as the shadow flies over the ground at up to 1,500 miles per hour. The Eclipse Megamovie Project hopes to choose and train over 1,000 volunteers to record as much of the eclipse as they are able, after which the terabytes of video data will be stitched together to generate a complete, high-resolution record of the eclipse as viewed from the ground. “We want everyone to know about the natural wonder, scientific importance and social impact of viewing a live total solar eclipse,” Laura Peticolas, a physicist who oversees the educational component of the Eclipse Megamovie Project, said in a press release. “It is truly a transformative, life-changing experience and we want to prepare people for that.” The Eclipse Megamovie Project will also release an app this summer that will let anyone contribute to the effort with their smartphone. This footage will be used to create a second, lower resolution video. While compiling the videos themselves is exciting, the team hopes to use them to answer some scientific questions, too. Of particular interest is the corona, the wispy filaments of plasma extending far beyond the solar surface. Generally hidden against the brilliance of the sun, the corona can normally be studied using a device called a coronagraph, which physically blocks out the sun’s disk. It turns out the moon makes a great natural coronagraph. Another point of interest is what’s called “Baily’s Beads,” little twinkles that appear around the rim of the moon as the sun shines through craters and gets blocked by peaks. Cellphone footage of these bright and dark spots can help astronomers map lunar features. The team will be putting the crowdsourcing system through its paces this week during an annular eclipse in Patagonia, and those who miss their chance to participate this summer may have a second shot during the next US total solar eclipse in April 2024. The Eclipse Megamovie Project is the latest in the recent trend of using so-called “citizen astronomers,” astronomy enthusiasts with little or no formal training who help the professionals sift through their data. Modern instruments often collect far more data than scientists can handle, and when it comes to many kinds of analysis, current computer programs still can’t beat good old-fashioned eyes and human attention. NASA recently invited citizen astronomers to help comb through images of nearby interstellar space to search for dim objects, such as an undiscovered planet or dwarf star, that might trick their computer software. “There are just over four light-years between Neptune and Proxima Centauri, the nearest star, and much of this vast territory is unexplored,” lead researcher Marc Kuchner, an astrophysicist at NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center, said in a press release. “Because there’s so little sunlight, even large objects in that region barely shine in visible light. But by looking in the infrared, WISE may have imaged objects we otherwise would have missed.” For any discoveries that lead to published work, the citizen astronomer will share credit, a point that can complicate the emerging field of collaboration between the public and scientists, as The Christian Science Monitor reported last fall: Citizen scientists interested in contributing their time and their cameras to the study of our sun and moon during this summer's eclipse can sign up for updates on the Eclipse Megavideo Project’s website.


News Article | February 22, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

RIVERSIDE, Calif. - The mosquito Aedes aegypti, which can spread dengue fever, chikungunya, Zika fever, and yellow fever virus, requires a blood meal to develop eggs. One way to control the spread of these diseases is to tamper with the reproductive events that follow this mosquito's blood meal. This is what a team of scientists at the University of California, Riverside has explored at the molecular level. The researchers focused on small regulatory RNA molecules, called microRNAs, which play a critical role in mosquito egg maturation. They studied microRNA expression in the Aedes aegypti fat body--the metabolic center that plays a key role in reproduction. Since proper functioning of the fat body is essential for the development of the female reproductive system after a blood meal, identifying which miRNAs are important to fat body functions, and what specific genes they target, can help design ways to manipulate the levels of microRNA or their targets, affect their interactions, disrupt mosquito reproduction, and thus prevent the spread of diseases the mosquitoes transmit. The researchers report online this week in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences that they observed five major microRNA expression peaks within a 48-hour period following the female mosquito's blood meal. "What we observed is that the levels of many miRNAs change significantly throughout the 48-hour period following a blood meal, indicating that these miRNAs, in turn, may be establishing significant changes in expression of key genes during this time in the fat body," said Fedor V. Karginov, an assistant professor of cell biology and neuroscience, who co-led the research team along with Alexander S. Raikhel, a distinguished professor of entomology at UC Riverside. "Our work has given us a much needed picture of which miRNAs are abundant in the fat body tissue, how each miRNA subgroup changes over time, and we have confirmation that specific up- and down-regulation of miRNA levels takes place during egg development." Specifically, the researchers measured the levels of all microRNAs in the fat body (around 100 different miRNAs) at five points of time, starting just before mosquitos take a blood meal, and then 6, 24, 36, and 48 hours after the blood meal. The timing of these was chosen based on previously known information on the timing of major physiological changes - or milestones - in the fat body after a blood meal. Karginov explained that each microRNA, together with a partner protein called Argonaute or "Ago," binds to (or "targets") several to many "messenger RNAs" (mRNAs), and thus down-regulates the expression of the corresponding genes. Determining the targets of important miRNAs is crucial to uncover the regulatory gene networks that drive the physiological changes in the fat body after blood meal. Karginov, Raikhel and their team members experimentally identified the binding sites for Ago/miRNAs on mRNAs in the fat body. They performed this identification at two points of time to study any changes that may have occurred, using "CLIP-seq," an experimentally challenging procedure that, to Karginov and his team's knowledge, has not been used on mosquito tissues before, and that provides a large trove of potential microRNA-mRNA interactions for further investigation. "The CLIP-seq data have given us insight into which genes the microRNA target, providing a solid foundation for future studies of miRNA regulation during the egg production cycle," Raikhel said. "Now that we know these genes, we are a step closer to controlling the spread of Aedes aegypti by disrupting a key process in the reproductive cycle: egg production." Karginov and Raikhel were joined in the research by Xiufeng Zhang (first author of the paper), a postdoctoral researcher in Raikhel's lab; Emre Aksoy, a second-year student in the Graduate Program in Genetics, Genomics and Bioinformatics; and Thomas Girke, a professor of bioinformatics. The study was supported by a grant from the National Institutes of Health. The University of California, Riverside is a doctoral research university, a living laboratory for groundbreaking exploration of issues critical to Inland Southern California, the state and communities around the world. Reflecting California's diverse culture, UCR's enrollment is now nearly 23,000 students. The campus opened a medical school in 2013 and has reached the heart of the Coachella Valley by way of the UCR Palm Desert Center. The campus has an annual statewide economic impact of more than $1 billion. A broadcast studio with fiber cable to the AT&T Hollywood hub is available for live or taped interviews. UCR also has ISDN for radio interviews. To learn more, call (951) UCR-NEWS.


News Article | February 16, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

BOSTON, MA (February 16, 2017) --Organizers of the 10th World Conference of Science Journalists (WCSJ2017) unveiled details of the upcoming event at an information session held today at the annual meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science. Announcements included program themes, new plenary speakers, an initiative to serve attendees from Latin America and the Caribbean, pre- and post-conference activities, an update on conference fundraising, and travel fellowships. WCSJ2017, which will take place October 26-30, 2017 in San Francisco, California, marks the first time that this international gathering of science journalists from the Americas, Africa, Asia, Australia, and Europe will be held in the United States. The conference will continue its tradition of welcoming colleagues from across the globe. Organized by the National Association of Science Writers (NASW) and the Council for the Advancement of Science Writing (CASW) in partnership with the World Federation of Science Journalists (WFSJ), it is expected to attract 1,200 attendees from over 80 countries and will be based at the San Francisco Marriott Marquis. The University of California San Francisco and UC Berkeley will together host a day of sessions and activities, followed by a day of science-themed field trips. --The selection of 47 breakout sessions by the WCSJ2017 Program Committee, a science committee, and the Association of Health Care Journalists (AHCJ), which will produce a global health journalism track. The sessions were chosen from more than 400 submitted proposals. Program themes will include: --The addition of five plenary speakers to the program: The program will also include a plenary session on Pseudoscientific Policies and Authoritarian Governments. Previously announced podium speakers include Thierry Zomahoun, president and chief executive officer of the African Institute for Mathematical Sciences, and UC Berkeley biologist Jennifer Doudna. The organizers announced that The Hastings Center, a bioethics research institute in New York, will organize a pre-conference symposium, "New Genetic Technologies: Ethical Debates and Global Science Policy." The Hastings Center symposium is part of an international scholarly project exploring "Gene Editing and Human Flourishing," with funding from the Templeton Foundation. Other planned pre-conference activities are training for student journalists and a full-day workshop for Latin American and Caribbean journalists. The Hastings Center and AHCJ are among several sponsors and partners who have recently joined to support WCSJ2017. Others include the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation, Bayer, The Brinson Foundation, and Nature. Johnson & Johnson Innovation is the conference's Diamond Sponsor and lead underwriter. Post-conference field trips are being organized by the Northern California Science Writers Association. NCSWA President Bob Sanders reported that the committee has "neat trips set up to the Monterey Bay Aquarium and to the Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute (MBARI), the UC Davis enology field station in Napa Valley's wine region, a seismology walk along the Hayward Fault, a USGS trip to coastal slide hazard areas, a visit to X, Google's moonshot factory, and an interactive immersion in drug development at Bayer." In a fundraising progress report, the organizers announced that more than $1.1 million in commitments have been secured toward the $2 million in sponsor and partner funding needed to support travel, program delivery, networking, and infrastructure for the conference. CASW and WFSJ are jointly recruiting conference sponsors. Varied sponsorship opportunities are available for foundations, science and media organizations, businesses, and individuals. A special fund for individual donations to support international travel fellowships to WCSJ2017 has been set up by CASW in honor of David Perlman, the longtime science editor for the San Francisco Chronicle and a past president of CASW and NASW. An anonymous donor is matching all donations until the fund reaches its goal of $20,000 in individual contributions. Organizers said they are within $4,000 of meeting the goal and continue to welcome donations online at wcsj2017.org. More than 75 online applications for travel fellowships have been received since the application window opened four weeks ago, including 17 applications for student fellowships. Fellowships will be awarded to attendees from the U.S. and around the world, with an emphasis on enabling attendance by those in developing countries, Latin America, and the Caribbean. The deadline for submission is March 15. Conference registration will open in early May. The organizers emphasized that the conference partners will do everything possible to bring colleagues from all nations to the conference. In a February 8 statement about travel to the U.S., they said: "We are resolute in our determination that the conference will continue its tradition of welcoming colleagues from across the globe, and we oppose any restrictions that would prevent participants from attending WCSJ2017. As October approaches, we will do everything we can to make the meeting accessible to all." CASW: Founded in 1959, the Council for the Advancement of Science Writing is a panel of distinguished journalists, science communication specialists, and scientists committed to improving the quality and quantity of science news reaching the public. CASW has joined with WFSJ to raise funds to support travel to WCSJ2017 for developing-country journalists, as well as hospitality and conference program expenses. NASW: Founded in 1934, the National Association of Science Writers is an association of more than 2,000 members chartered to "foster the dissemination of accurate information through all media normally devoted to informing the public." NASW's programs improve the craft of science writing, fight for the free flow of science news, and honor excellence in science writing. WFSJ: The Montréal-based World Federation of Science Journalists connects science journalists in more than 50 associations around the world through conferences, competitions, and networking, and encourages strong, critical coverage of issues in science and technology, environment, health and medicine, agriculture, and related fields. Current programs help journalists worldwide learn about infectious diseases, including Ebola and hepatitis C. WFSJ offers an online science journalism course in 10 languages. UCSF and UC Berkeley: UC San Francisco is the leading university in the U.S. exclusively focused on health. UCSF is dedicated to advanced biomedical research, graduate-level education in the life sciences and health professions, and excellence in patient care. UC Berkeley is the flagship of the University of California system. Its undergraduate program ranks third overall among the world's universities in the latest U.S. News & World Report rankings, while its graduate research programs uniformly rank among the best in the world. Combined, current UCSF and UC Berkeley faculty have earned more than 25 Nobel Prizes. Rosalind Reid, executive director, Council for the Advancement of Science Writing: ros@casw.org


News Article | February 17, 2017
Site: news.yahoo.com

What yesterday’s CRISPR hearing at the USPTO might mean for the revolutionary gene-editing technique This essay appears in today’s edition of the Fortune Brainstorm Health Daily. Get it delivered straight to your inbox. Down goes Frazier! Down goes Frazier! Down goes Frazier! So shouted Howard Cosell two minutes into the first round of the Sunshine Showdown in Jamaica, as a punishing upper cut from George Foreman sent Smokin' Joe to the canvas on January 22, 1973. And if you listen very closely, there are echoes of Cosell's legendary incantation, his exultant chime, in this one-sentence call made yesterday by a three-judge patent trial and appeal board in Alexandria, Virginia: "In light of the determination that the parties' claims do not interfere...we enter judgment of no interference-in-fact, which neither cancels nor finally refuses either parties' claims." It takes a second or two, but you can hear, in those words, the brutal poetry of pugilism. The biggest biotech fight of the century thus far, the heavyweight title bout between the Broad Institute of Harvard and MIT and the University of California over the ownership of the CRISPR-Cas9 genome-editing technology--or the Thrilla in Virginia, as I described it in December--is over. And decided by the most technical of TKOs. "Down goes Doudna!" the words from the patent office cry. That would be Jennifer Doudna, of UC Berkeley, who developed the modern-day version of CRISPR--a revolutionary hack of an age-old bacterial defense system--with Emmanuelle Charpentier, who is now affiliated with Berlin's Max Planck Institute for Infection Biology. The technique, widely hailed as a breakthrough, allows for the simple and (mostly) precise editing of virtually any genome. But...the most valuable patents for this invention (at least for now) will remain with the Broad scientist who got the patent office to "fast track" his claim. Yesterday's ruling effectively said that Feng Zhang's adoption of the technique in human and mouse cells was, in fact, a new and patentable invention rather than an "obvious" extension of Doudna's and Charpentier's work. (Sharon Begley at STAT has a nice analysis here as well as a link to the patent appeal board's 51-page explanation of its judgment.) That decision could be worth billions of dollars to the Broad and its parent institutions. And in my view, it will also put yet another chill on collaborative science, forcing inventors to keep their discoveries close to the vest until they're absolutely sure they've unlocked every last cent of financial value. Expect university lawyers and tech transfer offices to tighten those lids even more than they already do. After that first knockdown by Foreman in the 1973 bout, the champ got his mandatory eight count and then returned to his feet. But in round two, Frazier would go to the mat five more times before the fight was called. The University of California released a press release yesterday that suggests it isn't giving up hope. But just as with the Foreman-Frazier fight, this match is clearly won.


News Article | February 15, 2017
Site: www.marketwired.com

Master's Degree is Part of the Department of Pharmacology in the School Of Medicine at UC Irvine IRVINE, CA--(Marketwired - Feb 13, 2017) - The University of California, Irvine, is launching a new, online Master of Science program in Pharmacology (MSP) in the Department of Pharmacology, School of Medicine. The MSP program is targeted toward working professionals in the pharmaceutical industry and related fields who are seeking an advanced degree while continuing their full-time jobs. With the overall goal to provide students with advanced scientific knowledge and research skills in the field of pharmacology, the MSP degree program addresses an unmet need in a major health industry. "The Master of Science in Pharmacology degree fills a void in training Master's level scientists in pharmacology, a discipline that is central to the discovery, development and use of therapeutic drugs," said Dr. Olivier Civelli, Chair and Professor, Department of Pharmacology at UC Irvine. "With a strong outlook for pharmacology-related employment for graduates with advanced degrees, this program prepares students to enhance their career within the pharmaceutical industry, at biotechnology companies, government agencies, research laboratories and academic programs in health sciences." By providing advanced training in pharmacology, the MSP program will prepare students for positions of leadership and responsibility in academic, industrial and government settings. The two-year course of online study will provide students with the basic understanding of molecular, cellular, organ, and clinical pharmacology. To fulfill the requirements of the program, students will complete 39 units of graduate courses and will write an extensive capstone research paper. The MSP program will begin Fall 2017, pending WSCUC approval. The deadline to apply for Fall 2017 admission is June 1, 2017. To register for the program, visit here. For further information on the new online Master of Science in Pharmacology degree program, please visit the website or contact Barbara Shainberg at bshainbe@uci.edu or 949-824-3130. About the University of California, Irvine: Founded in 1965, UCI is the youngest member of the prestigious Association of American Universities. The campus has produced three Nobel laureates and is known for its academic achievement, premier research, innovation and anteater mascot. Led by Chancellor Howard Gillman, UCI has more than 28,000 students and offers 192 degree programs. Located in one of the world's safest and most economically vibrant communities, it's Orange County's second-largest employer, contributing $4.8 billion annually to the local economy.


Phased array technology available now to meet emerging billion dollar 5G markets TowerJazz, the global specialty foundry leader, and The University of California, San Diego (UCSD), a recognized leader for microwave, millimeter-wave, mixed-signal RFICs, and phased arrays, demonstrate for the first time, a greater than 12 Gbps, 5G phased-array chipset.  This chipset demonstrates that products can be fabricated today to meet the emerging 5G telecom standards for the next wave of worldwide mobile communications. The chipset operates at 28 to 31 GHz, a new communications band planned for release by the FCC. The chipset uses TowerJazz’s high volume SiGe BiCMOS technology, with record performance at the 28GHz band, representing a more than 10-times improvement in data rate vs. 4G LTE, and today meets many other technical specification requirements of the emerging 5G standard. About the 5G Chip Sets and H3 Process The 5G transmit and receive chipsets reported today achieved more than 12 Gbps data rates at 30 meters separation, and greater than 3 Gbps when separated by 300 meters, using two polarizations.  The UCSD chip utilizes 16-64-256 QAM (quadrature amplitude modulation) schemes to achieve these data rates.  The measured EVM (error vector magnitude), a figure of merit used to determine the quality of the data received, suggests both chipsets are already performing at 4G LTE levels.  The 64-QAM link reported today at 12 Gbps, has an EVM < 5% at 30 meters.  The 16 QAM link at 3 Gbps has an EVM <12% at 300m and over all scan angles, and all with no FEC or equalization. The system operates in a dual-polarization mode.  In addition, the 4 x 8 (32-element) phased-arrays use SiGe core chips and are assembled on a multi-layer printed-circuit board together with the antennas.  Record figures of merit such as NF (Noise Figure), EIRP (Equivalent Isotropically Radiated Power), and EVM have been demonstrated. “The TowerJazz H3 platform is truly great, and allows for 13-20 dBm transmit power per element with high PAE (power-added efficiency) of 20% at 28 GHz. Also, it offers very low-noise transistors resulting in an LNA NF of 2.4 dB at 28 GHz, high-Q inductors and low-loss transmission-lines for on-chip power distribution,” said Prof. Gabriel Rebeiz, member of the U.S. National Academy of Engineering, distinguished professor and wireless communications industry chair at the UC San Diego Jacobs School of Engineering. By using TowerJazz’s SiGe BiCMOS technology, UCSD’s design team, led by graduate student Kerim Kibaroglu and post-doctoral fellow Mustafa Sayginer, and with the use of state-of-the-art Keysight equipment such as the 8195A Arbitrary Wave Generator, the DSOS804A Digital Scope and the Signal Studio suite with the VSA software, was able to achieve record links at 30 to 300 meters over all scan angles. Prof. Rebeiz added, “We thank TowerJazz for this wonderful process and look forward to continued collaboration.” Today, peak wireless data rates for 4G LTE can be up to 1 Gbps, but are nominally lower around 100 to 300 Mbps.  Here, TowerJazz has demonstrated more than 10x those speeds using the UCSD 5G next-generation mobile designs made with its high volume H3 technology. “We continue to release additional technology nodes, e.g. our H5 and H6, which have even lower noise devices and higher speed capabilities. These technologies will enable 5G designers to further increase data rates through higher QAM modulation schemes, or shrink chip sizes and increase the distance over which these 5G chips can perform,” said Dr. David Howard, Executive Director and TowerJazz Fellow.   “Also, as we add new features to our SiGe Terabit Platform, we support easy evolution of customer technology for fast time to market. This allows our customers to grow their technology roadmap and products as the 5G standards evolve.” Availability The SBC18H3 process, as well as H4, H5 processes, are available through TowerJazz at www.towerjazz.com. Chips used in the technology demonstrations are available from UCSD and interested parties should contact Prof. Gabriel M. Rebeiz; Department of Electrical and Computing Engineering at UCSD, 858/336-3186 or rebeiz@ece.ucsd.edu. About Phased Arrays Phased arrays allow the electronic steering of an antenna beam in any direction and with high antenna gain by controlling the phase at each antenna element. The radiated beam can be “moved in space” using entirely electronic means through control of the phase and amplitude at each antenna element used to generate the beam. This beam steering technique is much more compact and much faster than mechanically steered arrays. Furthermore, phased arrays allow the creation of deep nulls in the radiation pattern to mitigate strong interference signals from several different directions. They have been in use since the 1950s in defense applications and are receiving intense commercial interest for automotive (radars) and communication (5G) chip markets. About UCSD The University of California, San Diego, is one of the leading Universities in mixed-signal, microwave and mm-wave RFICs, digital communications, applied electromagnetics, RF MEMS (microelectromechanical systems) and nano-electronics research, and is home to the Center for Wireless Communications.  UCSD has an annual research budget exceeding $850M, and its Jacobs School of Engineering is ranked as Number 17 in the US-News and World Report 2015 ranking.  The Electrical and Computer Engineering Department, consisting of 46 teaching tenured faculty, trains approximately 400 graduate students per year. For more information, please visit www.ece.ucsd.edu and www.ucsd.edu. About TowerJazz Tower Semiconductor Ltd. (NASDAQ:TSEM) (TASE:TSEM) and its fully owned U.S. subsidiaries Jazz Semiconductor, Inc. and TowerJazz Texas Inc., operate collectively under the brand name TowerJazz, the global specialty foundry leader. TowerJazz manufactures integrated circuits, offering a broad range of customizable process technologies including: SiGe, BiCMOS, mixed-signal/CMOS, RF CMOS, CMOS image sensor, integrated power management (BCD and 700V), and MEMS. TowerJazz also provides a world-class design enablement platform for a quick and accurate design cycle as well as Transfer Optimization and development Process Services (TOPS) to IDMs and fabless companies that need to expand capacity. To provide multi-fab sourcing and extended capacity for its customers, TowerJazz operates two manufacturing facilities in Israel (150mm and 200mm), two in the U.S. (200mm) and three additional facilities in Japan (two 200mm and one 300mm) through TowerJazz Panasonic Semiconductor Co. (TPSCo), established with Panasonic Corporation of which TowerJazz has the majority holding. Through TPSCo, TowerJazz provides leading edge 45nm CMOS, 65nm RF CMOS and 65nm 1.12um pixel technologies, including the most advanced image sensor technologies. For more information, please visit www.towerjazz.com or www.tpsemico.com. Safe Harbor Regarding Forward-Looking Statements This press release includes forward-looking statements, which are subject to risks and uncertainties. Actual results may vary from those projected or implied by such forward-looking statements. A complete discussion of risks and uncertainties that may affect the accuracy of forward-looking statements included in this press release or which may otherwise affect TowerJazz’s business is included under the heading "Risk Factors" in Tower’s most recent filings on Forms 20-F, F-3, F-4 and 6-K, as were filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission (the “SEC”) and the Israel Securities Authority and Jazz’s most recent filings on Forms 10-K and 10-Q, as were filed with the SEC, respectively. Tower and Jazz do not intend to update, and expressly disclaim any obligation to update, the information contained in this release.


News Article | March 1, 2017
Site: news.yahoo.com

BERKELEY, Calif. (AP) — The University of California said it investigated 113 cases of sexual misconduct involving staff and faculty at its 10 campuses over a recent three-year period, according to hundreds of pages of internal documents released Tuesday. The information was released to The Associated Press and other news organizations following a public records request made amid a string of high-profile cases at UC Berkeley last year. Many details and personal information in the documents are redacted but the records give an overview of how many sexual harassment cases were investigated system-wide at the University of California in recent years. The 113 cases occurred between January 2013 to April 6, 2016 and include allegations that range from inappropriate conduct to sexual assault, according to a summary from the office of UC President Janet Napolitano. All 113 cases involve employees found to have violated the University's Sexual Violence and Sexual Harassment policy. About 58 percent of the cases came from complaints by staff members, while 35 percent were from student complaints. The rest were unknown or anonymous. It said 7 percent of the cases involved sexual assault, "including the touching of intimate body parts." The summary also said that approximately two-thirds of the people accused of misconduct no longer work for the University of California. Berkeley has faced intense criticism and scrutiny for what student groups and victims rights groups called lax discipline for senior faculty involved in sexual misconduct cases. In one case, Sujit Choudhry, the former dean of the law school, received only a temporary pay cut and orders to undergo counseling as punishment following a 2015 investigation substantiated claims that he repeatedly kissed and touched a subordinate. The university also faced criticism for several other sexual harassment cases, including one involving the campus' vice chancellor for research and a prominent astronomer who were initially were allowed to keep their jobs but ended up resigning under pressure, as did Choudhry. In response to the cases, Napolitano has moved to strengthen campus procedures for investigating and disciplining faulty members in sexual harassment cases, said UC spokeswoman Claire Doan. Napolitano has put in place mandatory sexual assault training for students and employees and created a system-wide peer review committee to evaluate proposed sanctions for senior university leaders and faculty found guilty of misconduct. Previously, it was up to individual campuses to impose sanctions on their own officials.


Patent
The University Of California and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory | Date: 2013-01-02

A system of heating a sample on a microchip includes the steps of providing a microchannel flow channel in the microchip; positioning the sample within the microchannel flow channel, providing a laser that directs a laser beam onto the sample for heating the sample; providing the microchannel flow channel with a wall section that receives the laser beam and enables the laser beam to pass through wall section of the microchannel flow channel without being appreciably heated by the laser beam; and providing a carrier fluid in the microchannel flow channel that moves the sample in the microchannel flow channel wherein the carrier fluid is not appreciably heated by the laser beam.

Loading The University of California collaborators
Loading The University of California collaborators