The University

Jaipur, India

The University

Jaipur, India
SEARCH FILTERS
Time filter
Source Type

News Article | May 8, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

A new cell separator that began life as a tinfoil and epoxy glue prototype built with supplies from a University shop could revolutionise stem-cell and regenerative cell-based therapies. Biomedical Engineers, in the Department of Mechanical Engineering Sciences, at the University of Surrey developed the new cell separator - which could help medical advances into cancer and Alzheimer's disease research. This is published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the USA. Thanks to the new design the separation process, which is used in vital therapies for life-threatening diseases, can be carried out at a fraction of the usual cost and can be used for therapeutic as well as research purposes. Separating cells, such as red and white blood cells, has become fundamental in the biomedical sciences for identifying cells for therapeutic and regenerative cell-based therapies. Separation techniques are also vital in biochemistry, electrical engineering, physics, and materials science. However, to date the process has been complicated and expensive. To overcome this, the University's dielectrophoresis (DEP)-based cell-separation method uses 3D electrodes on a low-cost disposable chip. Using a simple electrical charge, one cell type is allowed to pass through the chip and the other is retained and subsequently recovered. The DEP sorts cells electrostatically, and is made using the same technology used in printed circuit boards. This causes the cell separation to be done 10,000 times faster by using a device which resembles an "electric sieve" which acts like a forcefield, by "catching" objects which are polarisable. The invention has come about after years of research, which started with an early prototype being made at the University of Surrey's shop from a roll of tin cooking foil and epoxy glue, ending with a "chip" that is cheap enough to be disposable, reducing the risk of cross contamination from previous separations. Usually separating cells involves the use of very expensive machines, which can cost over half a million pounds and need expensive chemicals, with costs of approximately £250 each time. However, the advantages of the University's new cell separator are that it costs one hundredth of the rival version, and its cell separations cost less than a tenth of the usual price. More importantly, it does not use chemical labels, so the cells could be used for therapeutic purposes. The University of Surrey's Professor Michael Pycraft Hughes said: "We believe that cell-separation techniques should be affordable to both buy and use. This is why our new DEP-based cell separation technique provides an amazing opportunity to exploit differences in cell electrophysiology, in fields such as stem-cell therapy and cancer. "We believe this offers significant promise as a new standard benchtop laboratory technique, and we look forward to seeing the major benefits it offers health and other fields."


Biomedical Engineers, in the Department of Mechanical Engineering Sciences, at the University of Surrey developed the new cell separator – which could help medical advances into cancer and Alzheimer's disease research. This is published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. Thanks to the new design the separation process, which is used in vital therapies for life-threatening diseases, can be carried out at a fraction of the usual cost and can be used for therapeutic as well as research purposes. Separating cells, such as red and white blood cells, has become fundamental in the biomedical sciences for identifying cells for therapeutic and regenerative cell-based therapies. Separation techniques are also vital in biochemistry, electrical engineering, physics, and materials science. However, to date the process has been complicated and expensive. To overcome this, the University's dielectrophoresis (DEP)-based cell-separation method uses 3D electrodes on a low-cost disposable chip. Using a simple electrical charge, one cell type is allowed to pass through the chip and the other is retained and subsequently recovered. The DEP sorts cells electrostatically, and is made using the same technology used in printed circuit boards. This causes the cell separation to be done 10,000 times faster by using a device which resembles an "electric sieve" which acts like a forcefield, by "catching" objects which are polarisable. The invention has come about after years of research, which started with an early prototype being made at the University of Surrey's shop from a roll of tin cooking foil and epoxy glue, ending with a "chip" that is cheap enough to be disposable, reducing the risk of cross contamination from previous separations. Usually separating cells involves the use of very expensive machines, which can cost over half a million pounds and need expensive chemicals, with costs of approximately £250 each time.  However, the advantages of the University's new cell separator are that it costs one hundredth of the rival version, and its cell separations cost less than a tenth of the usual price. More importantly, it does not use chemical labels, so the cells could be used for therapeutic purposes. The University of Surrey's Professor Michael Pycraft Hughes said: "We believe that cell-separation techniques should be affordable to both buy and use. This is why our new DEP-based cell separation technique provides an amazing opportunity to exploit differences in cell electrophysiology, in fields such as stem-cell therapy and cancer. "We believe this offers significant promise as a new standard benchtop laboratory technique, and we look forward to seeing the major benefits it offers health and other fields." More information: Shabnam A. Faraghat et al. High-throughput, low-loss, low-cost, and label-free cell separation using electrophysiology-activated cell enrichment, Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (2017). DOI: 10.1073/pnas.1700773114


MIAMI -- Researchers at the University of Miami (UM) Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science have developed a new technology to measure the currents near the ocean's surface that carry pollutants such as plastics and spilled oil. This new technique, which includes a specialized video camera to remotely sense currents in the upper few centimeters of the water column, can help scientists more accurately predict the fate of spilled oil or other marine pollutants that are transported at the surface layer by providing these measurements that were previously unattainable. "The health and economic impacts of spilled oil and marine debris have the potential to be profoundly negative," said UM Rosenstiel School postdoctoral researcher Nathan Laxague, and lead author of the study. "Improving our ability to measure near-surface ocean currents can aid in disaster response and provides for greater context in understanding the dynamics of marine pollutant transport." Laxague and colleagues conducted two experiments -- one in a laboratory and one in the field at the mouth of the Columbia River--to test their new technique. In the laboratory study, the researchers imaged the water surface in the SUSTAIN (SUrge-STructure Atmosphere INteraction) facility using a specialized camera that simultaneously records three polarizations of reflected light off the ocean surface to determine the current profile for a range of wind speeds. In the field study, a research vessel was stationed in the mouth of the Columbia River along the Oregon-Washington border to verify the results from the lab experiment in a real-world setting. The data gathered from the experiments showed that the innovative optical technique is ideal to measure currents within the first few centimeters at the ocean's surface. "This slice of the water column is important because it is where oil, larvae and other drifting floating objects are, and yet, until now, scientists had no good way to measure it using existing technologies," said UM Rosenstiel School Ocean Science Professor Brian Haus, a co-author of the study. The study was conducted as a part of the CARTHE (Consortium for Advanced Research on Transport of Hydrocarbon in the Environment) and RIVET (RIVerine and Estuarine Transport) projects. Based at the UM Rosenstiel School, CARTHE, is a research team dedicated to predicting the fate of the oil released into our environment as a result of future oil spills. The paper, titled "Passive optical sensing of the near-surface, wind-driven current profile," appears in the Journal of Atmospheric and Oceanic Technology in its online pre-print version. The study's authors include: Laxague, Haus, David Ortiz-Suslow, Conor Smith, Guillaume Novelli, Hanjing Dai, Tamay Özgökmen, and Hans Graber from the UM Rosenstiel School Department of Ocean Sciences. The Gulf of Mexico Research Initiative (grant #SA1207GOMRI005) and the Office of Naval Research (grant #N000141410643) provided funding for the study. About the University of Miami's Rosenstiel School The University of Miami is one of the largest private research institutions in the southeastern United States. The University's mission is to provide quality education, attract and retain outstanding students, support the faculty and their research, and build an endowment for University initiatives. Founded in the 1940's, the Rosenstiel School of Marine & Atmospheric Science has grown into one of the world's premier marine and atmospheric research institutions. Offering dynamic interdisciplinary academics, the Rosenstiel School is dedicated to helping communities to better understand the planet, participating in the establishment of environmental policies, and aiding in the improvement of society and quality of life. For more information, visit: http://www. .


News Article | May 8, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

Insecticide resistance sounds like a superpower for the average male fruit fly - but there's a catch. Scientists have found that the single genetic change which protects the flies from the pesticide DDT also makes males smaller, less aggressive and "rubbish" at courting females. Resistant males are also more prone to "decamping" - the technical term for giving up midway through a mating attempt. The University of Exeter researchers were "astounded" that a single allele (a different version of the same gene) could have such a dramatic impact. "It is amazing that even if all the genes are exactly the same, having this one gene expressed at a higher level has all these effects," said Professor Nina Wedell, of the Centre for Ecology and Conservation on Exeter's Penryn Campus in Cornwall. "The expression level of one gene responsible for detoxifying DDT also makes males smaller, less aggressive and rubbish at courting. "We don't yet know how this comes about." The researchers studied common fruit flies (Drosophila melanogaster), and found that DDT-resistant males also: - performed courtship songs (wing vibration) and chased females at lower rates - were less likely to follow a courtship song with an attempt to mate - had a two-fold increase in "copulation latency" (time spent courting before a female accepted them as a mate) - were less likely to win in competitive mating trials, even if they were larger than their non-DDT-resistant male rivals The paper, published in the journal Behavior Genetics, is entitled: "Pleiotropic effects of DDT resistance on male size and behaviour."


News Article | May 4, 2017
Site: www.reuters.com

(Reuters Health) - The right kind of video game might one day help improve attention skills in some kids with sensory disorders that make it hard to process what they see and hear, a small experiment suggests.


News Article | May 5, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

American Scientific Publishers, a publisher of scientific journals and books in the fields of science, engineering, and technology, has given Wei Chen, a physics professor at the University of Texas at Arlington, a Best Paper Award for a journal article cited 364 times to date. "According to a statistical report in the journal Science, only five percent of articles are cited more than 200 times in 10 years after publication, so this is an important recognition of my work," Chen said. "It also reflects that this paper opens a new area of research where many other scientists are now also working." The paper, "Using Nanoparticles to Enable Simultaneous Radiation and Photodynamic Therapies for Cancer Treatment," was published in the Journal of Nanoscience and Nanotechnology in 2006. For this paper, Chen described how new materials called nanoparticles could be activated by light to produce toxins to kill cancer. This research involved developing the materials and developing an entirely new method to fight cancer. He has since built out this research with more than 20 further journal articles. The most recent, "A New Modality of Cancer Treatment - Nanoparticle Mediated Microwave Induced Photodynamic Therapy," generated international interest. This article described how microwaves could be used to activate nanoparticles to fight cancer cells. "I came to UTA specifically to develop research around this concept and obtained more than $2 million in funding to achieve these advances around nanoparticles and cancer," Chen said. "I have also patented both the materials and the method and I want to make it commercially available to cancer patients in the future." Alex Weiss, UTA chair of physics, congratulated Chen on this achievement and his research program, which contributes to the University's strategic theme of Health and the Human Condition within the Strategic Plan 2020: Bold Solutions|Global Impact. "Dr. Chen has carved out an important niche of expertise in using light and nanoparticles to fight cancer," Weiss said. "This award is recognition of his capacity to produce innovative solutions to pressing health problems." The University of Texas at Arlington is a Carnegie Research-1 "highest research activity" institution. With a projected global enrollment of close to 57,000, UTA is one of the largest institutions in the state of Texas. Guided by its Strategic Plan 2020 Bold Solutions|Global Impact, UTA fosters interdisciplinary research and education within four broad themes: health and the human condition, sustainable urban communities, global environmental impact, and data-driven discovery. UTA was recently cited by U.S. News & World Report as having the second lowest average student debt among U.S. universities. U.S. News & World Report lists UTA as having the fifth highest undergraduate diversity index among national universities. The University is a Hispanic-Serving Institution and is ranked as the top four-year college in Texas for veterans on Military Times' 2017 Best for Vets list.


News Article | May 5, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

SOLOMONS, MD (MAY 5, 2017)--A new study by scientists at the University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science's Chesapeake Biological Laboratory, Cornell University and Duke University is the first in a series to understand how marine mammals like porpoises, whales, and dolphins may be impacted by the construction of wind farms off the coast of Maryland. The new research offers insight into previously unknown habits of harbor porpoises in the Maryland Wind Energy Area, a 125-square-mile area off the coast of Ocean City that may be the nation's first commercial-scale offshore wind farm. Offshore wind farms provide renewable energy, but activities during the construction can affect marine mammals that use sound for communication, finding food, and navigation. "It is critical to understand where marine mammals spend their time in areas of planning developments, like offshore wind farms, in order to inform regulators and developers on how to most effectively avoid and minimize negative impacts during the construction phase when loud sounds may be emitted," said Helen Bailey, the project leader at the UMCES' Chesapeake Biological Laboratory. Scientists from the University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science used underwater microphones called hydrophones to detect and map the habits of harbor porpoises, one of the smallest marine mammals. Bailey describes harbor porpoises as "very shy" ranging 4 to 5 feet long with a small triangular fin that can be hard to spot. They swim primarily in the ocean, spending summers north in the Bay of Fundy and migrating to the Mid-Atlantic, as far south as North Carolina, in the winter. There are about 80,000 of them in the northwestern Atlantic. "There was so little known about them in this area," said Bailey. "It was suspected they used the waters off Maryland, but we had no idea how frequently they occurred here in the winter until we analyzed these data." Porpoises produce echolocation clicks, a type of sonar that hits an object and reflects back to tell them its distance, size and shape. They use it to navigate and feed. The researchers used hydrophones anchored 65-145 feet deep, and about 10 feet off the bottom of the ocean, to pick up these clicks over the course of a year. "We found that harbor porpoises occurred significantly more frequently during January to May, and foraged for food significantly more often in the evenings to early mornings," said study author Jessica Wingfield. Scheduling wind farm construction activities in the Maryland WEA to take place during summer months (June to September) could reduce the likelihood of disturbance to harbor porpoises. "We were certainly surprised by how frequently we detected harbor porpoises because there had not been a lot of reported sightings," said Wingfield. Maryland Department of Natural Resources secured the funding for this study from the Maryland Energy Administration's Offshore Wind Development Fund and the Bureau of Ocean Energy Management. "Year-round spatiotemporal distribution of harbour porpoises within and around the Maryland wind energy area" was recently published in PLOS ONE. The University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science leads the way toward better management of Maryland's natural resources and the protection and restoration of the Chesapeake Bay. From a network of laboratories located across the state, UMCES scientists provide sound advice to help state and national leaders manage the environment, and prepare future scientists to meet the global challenges of the 21st century.


News Article | May 5, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

SAN DIEGO, CA -- Despite having higher rates of preeclampsia, a dangerous high-blood pressure disorder of late pregnancy, obese women may be less than half as likely to suffer strokes, seizures, and other serious complications of the disorder. The findings are among those from two new studies of preeclampsia by researchers at the Perelman School of Medicine at University of Pennsylvania showing how obesity may help clinicians identify risk for the condition or other complications. The second study highlighted risk factors, including obesity, for persistent high blood pressure after delivery among women with preeclampsia. The studies (posters 31C and 20B, respectively) will be presented at the American Congress of Obstetricians & Gynecologists' (ACOG) Annual Clinical and Scientific Meeting in San Diego. Preeclampsia, marked by high blood pressure and protein in the urine (a sign of hypertension-related stress on the kidneys) occurs in five to eight percent of pregnancies. Although it usually arises in late pregnancy and resolves quickly after delivery, it can lead to serious complications for the mother and/or baby, and is one of the top causes of stillbirth and maternal death during pregnancy. In addition, recent research has shown that the long-term effects of preeclampsia may lead to an increased risk of heart disease for the mother later in life. "We don't know enough about the factors that lead to more serious outcomes in preeclampsia, but results of studies like these are starting to give us a better understanding," said Sindhu Srinivas, MD, MSCE, an associate professor at the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, and director of Obstetrical Services at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, who was a co-author of both studies. In the first study, the researchers examined hospital records for 193 women who had been diagnosed with severe preeclampsia. This medical emergency features episodes of very high blood pressure ( greater than160 systolic or 110 diastolic) with immediate risks of serious and potentially fatal complications. Comparing the obese and non-obese members of this group, the researchers found that the obese women were less than half as likely to have had any of the more serious outcomes of severe preeclampsia, which include stroke, liver failure, kidney failure, blood clotting disorders, and seizures (eclampsia). The authors say the finding is somewhat surprising since obese women are known to have a higher rate of preeclampsia overall -- and in fact, obesity is one of the leading risk factors for the condition. "We need to follow this up with further studies, but our findings here suggest that obese women may get a different, less dangerous form of preeclampsia that has a lower risk of immediate complications," said Lisa Levine, MD, an assistant professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology and senior author on the study. "While the immediate risks appear to be less, this does not speak to the long-term cardiovascular risks that accompany a history of having preeclampsia," Levine states. The four trajectories of postpartum blood pressure In the second study, Penn researchers tracked blood pressure before and after delivery in 96 women with preeclampsia. Blood pressure in such women usually returns to normal within a day or so of delivery, but not always, so the researchers sought to identify factors associated with persistent high blood pressure after delivery. Results showed that women with preeclampsia tend to have one of four basic trajectories of blood pressure after delivery: blood pressure falling to normal levels within a day of delivery; blood pressure starting at very high levels and remaining high after delivery; blood pressure starting near-normal but rising after delivery; and blood pressure falling slowly after delivery but plateauing at mildly high levels. The analysis revealed that women with the first, healthiest trajectory were, on average, young (24.75 years), with a modest weight (150 lbs) at their first prenatal visit , delivered their babies around 36.5 weeks of gestation, and were more likely to deliver vaginally. By contrast, women with the most worrisome trajectory - blood pressure starting very high and staying very high for days after delivery -were about 10 years older and 65 pounds heavier on average, delivered their babies around 33 weeks of gestation, and were more likely to deliver via caesarean section. The researchers also found that persistent or rising blood pressure after delivery was associated with positive fluid balance - an excess of fluid intake over urinary output -- in the period from hospital admission to a day after delivery. "Fluid balance is an easily modifiable factor, and so we hope to investigate in future studies whether lowering this balance can speed up the resolution of hypertension after delivery," said lead author Adi Hirshberg, MD, a fellow in Obstetrics & Gynecology at Penn Medicine. Other co-authors were, for the first study, Christina Paidas-Teefey and Celeste Durnwald, and for the second study, Mary Sammel. Penn Medicine is one of the world's leading academic medical centers, dedicated to the related missions of medical education, biomedical research, and excellence in patient care. Penn Medicine consists of the Raymond and Ruth Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania (founded in 1765 as the nation's first medical school) and the University of Pennsylvania Health System, which together form a $6.7 billion enterprise. The Perelman School of Medicine has been ranked among the top five medical schools in the United States for the past 20 years, according to U.S. News & World Report's survey of research-oriented medical schools. The School is consistently among the nation's top recipients of funding from the National Institutes of Health, with $392 million awarded in the 2016 fiscal year. The University of Pennsylvania Health System's patient care facilities include: The Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania and Penn Presbyterian Medical Center -- which are recognized as one of the nation's top "Honor Roll" hospitals by U.S. News & World Report -- Chester County Hospital; Lancaster General Health; Penn Wissahickon Hospice; and Pennsylvania Hospital -- the nation's first hospital, founded in 1751. Additional affiliated inpatient care facilities and services throughout the Philadelphia region include Good Shepherd Penn Partners, a partnership between Good Shepherd Rehabilitation Network and Penn Medicine. Penn Medicine is committed to improving lives and health through a variety of community-based programs and activities. In fiscal year 2016, Penn Medicine provided $393 million to benefit our community.


News Article | May 8, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

PHILADELPHIA - A newly identified molecular chain of events in a mouse model of prostate cancer highlights novel targets to treat it and other cancers. A team led by Marcelo Kazanietz, PhD, a professor of Systems Pharmacology and Translational Therapeutics, published in Cell Reports that the overexpression of a protein called PKCε with the loss of the tumor suppressor Pten causes the progression of prostate cancer. This deadly combination produces an uptick in the levels of the cancer-promoting molecule CXCL13. When the team purposely disrupted CXCL13, or CXCR5, the cell-surface receptor it attaches to, the metastatic and tumor-forming characteristics of the mouse prostate cancer cells were impaired. "In addition to providing evidence for a vicious cancer cycle driven by PKCε, our studies identified a compelling rationale for blocking the CXCL13-CXCR5 molecules as a new cancer treatment," Kazanietz said. He and colleagues plan to identify compounds to block CXCR5 or CXCL13 with potential to be developed as anti-cancer agents. The researchers also suggested that CXCL13 levels in blood could be used as a biomarker to measure the precise state of prostate cancer progression in a patient. The team's next step will be to interfere with CXCR5/CXCL13 signals not only from the cancer cells but also from other cells in the tumor microenvironment that contribute to cancer growth. Pulmonologists and oncologists have also observed that PKCε is overexpressed in lung cancer patients, but they do not fully understand its exact molecular consequences. In general, a high level of PKCε is associated with a poor prognosis. "We are in the midst of extending these findings to lung cancer," said Kazanietz, who is collaborating with Penn Medicine researchers David Feldser, PhD, an assistant professor of Cancer Biology, Steven M. Albelda, MD, a professor of Pulmonary, Allergy and Critical Care, and Evgeniy Eruslanov, PhD, a research assistant professor of Thoracic Surgery. This research was funded in part by the National Institutes of Health (R01-CA089202, R01-CA189765, R01-CA196232), the Department of Defense (PC130641, W81XWH-12-1-0009). Penn Medicine is one of the world's leading academic medical centers, dedicated to the related missions of medical education, biomedical research, and excellence in patient care. Penn Medicine consists of the Raymond and Ruth Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania (founded in 1765 as the nation's first medical school) and the University of Pennsylvania Health System, which together form a $6.7 billion enterprise. The Perelman School of Medicine has been ranked among the top five medical schools in the United States for the past 20 years, according to U.S. News & World Report's survey of research-oriented medical schools. The School is consistently among the nation's top recipients of funding from the National Institutes of Health, with $392 million awarded in the 2016 fiscal year. The University of Pennsylvania Health System's patient care facilities include: The Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania and Penn Presbyterian Medical Center -- which are recognized as one of the nation's top "Honor Roll" hospitals by U.S. News & World Report -- Chester County Hospital; Lancaster General Health; Penn Wissahickon Hospice; and Pennsylvania Hospital -- the nation's first hospital, founded in 1751. Additional affiliated inpatient care facilities and services throughout the Philadelphia region include Good Shepherd Penn Partners, a partnership between Good Shepherd Rehabilitation Network and Penn Medicine. Penn Medicine is committed to improving lives and health through a variety of community-based programs and activities. In fiscal year 2016, Penn Medicine provided $393 million to benefit our community.


News Article | May 5, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

SAN DIEGO, CA -- Despite having higher rates of preeclampsia, a dangerous high-blood pressure disorder of late pregnancy, obese women may be less than half as likely to suffer strokes, seizures, and other serious complications of the disorder. The findings are among those from two new studies of preeclampsia by researchers at the Perelman School of Medicine at University of Pennsylvania showing how obesity may help clinicians identify risk for the condition or other complications. The second study highlighted risk factors, including obesity, for persistent high blood pressure after delivery among women with preeclampsia. The studies (posters 31C and 20B, respectively) will be presented at the American Congress of Obstetricians & Gynecologists' (ACOG) Annual Clinical and Scientific Meeting in San Diego. Preeclampsia, marked by high blood pressure and protein in the urine (a sign of hypertension-related stress on the kidneys) occurs in five to eight percent of pregnancies. Although it usually arises in late pregnancy and resolves quickly after delivery, it can lead to serious complications for the mother and/or baby, and is one of the top causes of stillbirth and maternal death during pregnancy. In addition, recent research has shown that the long-term effects of preeclampsia may lead to an increased risk of heart disease for the mother later in life. "We don't know enough about the factors that lead to more serious outcomes in preeclampsia, but results of studies like these are starting to give us a better understanding," said Sindhu Srinivas, MD, MSCE, an associate professor at the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, and director of Obstetrical Services at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, who was a co-author of both studies. In the first study, the researchers examined hospital records for 193 women who had been diagnosed with severe preeclampsia. This medical emergency features episodes of very high blood pressure ( greater than160 systolic or 110 diastolic) with immediate risks of serious and potentially fatal complications. Comparing the obese and non-obese members of this group, the researchers found that the obese women were less than half as likely to have had any of the more serious outcomes of severe preeclampsia, which include stroke, liver failure, kidney failure, blood clotting disorders, and seizures (eclampsia). The authors say the finding is somewhat surprising since obese women are known to have a higher rate of preeclampsia overall -- and in fact, obesity is one of the leading risk factors for the condition. "We need to follow this up with further studies, but our findings here suggest that obese women may get a different, less dangerous form of preeclampsia that has a lower risk of immediate complications," said Lisa Levine, MD, an assistant professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology and senior author on the study. "While the immediate risks appear to be less, this does not speak to the long-term cardiovascular risks that accompany a history of having preeclampsia," Levine states. The four trajectories of postpartum blood pressure In the second study, Penn researchers tracked blood pressure before and after delivery in 96 women with preeclampsia. Blood pressure in such women usually returns to normal within a day or so of delivery, but not always, so the researchers sought to identify factors associated with persistent high blood pressure after delivery. Results showed that women with preeclampsia tend to have one of four basic trajectories of blood pressure after delivery: blood pressure falling to normal levels within a day of delivery; blood pressure starting at very high levels and remaining high after delivery; blood pressure starting near-normal but rising after delivery; and blood pressure falling slowly after delivery but plateauing at mildly high levels. The analysis revealed that women with the first, healthiest trajectory were, on average, young (24.75 years), with a modest weight (150 lbs) at their first prenatal visit , delivered their babies around 36.5 weeks of gestation, and were more likely to deliver vaginally. By contrast, women with the most worrisome trajectory - blood pressure starting very high and staying very high for days after delivery -were about 10 years older and 65 pounds heavier on average, delivered their babies around 33 weeks of gestation, and were more likely to deliver via caesarean section. The researchers also found that persistent or rising blood pressure after delivery was associated with positive fluid balance - an excess of fluid intake over urinary output - in the period from hospital admission to a day after delivery. "Fluid balance is an easily modifiable factor, and so we hope to investigate in future studies whether lowering this balance can speed up the resolution of hypertension after delivery," said lead author Adi Hirshberg, MD, a fellow in Obstetrics & Gynecology at Penn Medicine. Other co-authors were, for the first study, Christina Paidas-Teefey and Celeste Durnwald, and for the second study, Mary Sammel. Penn Medicine is one of the world's leading academic medical centers, dedicated to the related missions of medical education, biomedical research, and excellence in patient care. Penn Medicine consists of the Raymond and Ruth Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania (founded in 1765 as the nation's first medical school) and the University of Pennsylvania Health System, which together form a $6.7 billion enterprise. The Perelman School of Medicine has been ranked among the top five medical schools in the United States for the past 20 years, according to U.S. News & World Report's survey of research-oriented medical schools. The School is consistently among the nation's top recipients of funding from the National Institutes of Health, with $392 million awarded in the 2016 fiscal year. The University of Pennsylvania Health System's patient care facilities include: The Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania and Penn Presbyterian Medical Center -- which are recognized as one of the nation's top "Honor Roll" hospitals by U.S. News & World Report -- Chester County Hospital; Lancaster General Health; Penn Wissahickon Hospice; and Pennsylvania Hospital -- the nation's first hospital, founded in 1751. Additional affiliated inpatient care facilities and services throughout the Philadelphia region include Good Shepherd Penn Partners, a partnership between Good Shepherd Rehabilitation Network and Penn Medicine. Penn Medicine is committed to improving lives and health through a variety of community-based programs and activities. In fiscal year 2016, Penn Medicine provided $393 million to benefit our community. The Abramson Cancer Center (ACC) of the University of Pennsylvania is a world leader in cancer research, patient care, and education. Its preeminent position is reflected in its continuous designation as a Comprehensive Cancer Center by the National Cancer Institute (NCI) since 1973, one of 45 such Centers in the United States, and its longstanding "exceptional" rating by the NCI. The ACC's clinical program is comprised of a dedicated, multi-disciplinary team of physicians, nurse practitioners, nurses, social workers, physical therapists, nutritionists, and patient care coordinators. Each year, the Center has more than 90,000 outpatient visits, over 11,800 inpatient discharges, and provides 37,000 chemotherapy treatments and more than 66,000 radiation treatments to its patients. In addition, the ACC is home to more than 400 basic, translational, and clinical scientists who work in tandem to advance new treatments and cures for cancers of all kinds.

Loading The University collaborators
Loading The University collaborators