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Valimaki I.A.,University of Turku | Vuorimaa T.,HAAGA-HELIA University of Applied Sciences | Ahotupa M.,University of Turku | Vasankari T.J.,UKK Institute for the Health Promotion Research
European Journal of Applied Physiology | Year: 2016

Purpose: Physical exercise has cardioprotective functions, which have been partly linked to high-density lipoprotein (HDL), and its functions. We studied the effects of endogenous oxidative stress, induced by acute exhaustive physical exercise, on concentration of oxidized HDL lipids. Methods: Twenty-four male national top-level endurance runners, 12 middle-distance runners and 12 marathon runners performed a maximal run on a treadmill until exhaustion. We analyzed concentrations of oxidized HDL (oxHDLlipids) and LDL lipids (oxLDLlipids), serum antioxidant potential (TRAP), paraoxonase activity and malondialdehyde. Venous blood samples were taken before, immediately, 15 and 90 min after exercise. Results: Immediately after the treadmill run the concentration of oxHDLlipids was increased by 24 % (p < 0.01). Simultaneously, the ratio of oxHDLlipids to oxLDLlipids increased by 55 % and the oxLDLlipids levels decreased by 19 % (p < 0.001), while serum malondialdehyde and TRAP increased by 54 % (p < 0.001) and 29 % (p < 0.01), respectively. After the 90 min recovery the concentration of oxHDLlipids was decreased towards the pre-exercise level, but that of oxLDLlipids remained decreased below pre-exercise values (p < 0.001). The change in oxLDLlipids after the run correlated positively with VO2max (r = 0.67, p < 0.001) and negatively with the change in paraoxonase activity (r = −0.47, p < 0.05). Conclusions: We conclude that acute exhaustive physical exercise increased the concentration of oxHDLlipids and decreased that of oxLDLlipids and the ratio of oxLDLlipids to oxHDLlipids, which suggests that during physical exercise HDL has an active role in the removal of lipid peroxides. © 2016 Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg Source


Voutilainen M.,University of Helsinki | Malmberg L.P.,University of Helsinki | Vasankari T.,Finnish Olympic Committee | Vasankari T.,UKK Institute for the Health Promotion Research | Haahtela T.,University of Helsinki
Clinical Respiratory Journal | Year: 2013

Introduction: In athletes, exercise-induced respiratory symptoms are common and their assessment is time and resource consuming. Objective: The objective was to evaluate fractional concentration of exhaled nitric oxide (FENO) as a predictor of bronchial hyperresponsiveness (BHR) and of asthma. Materials and Methods: Eighty-seven elite athletes and a control group of 87 sedentary patients with symptoms suggesting asthma underwent measurements of FENO and of BHR by using methacholine provocation test (MCH) and eucapnic voluntary hyperpnoea (EVH) (athletes) or histamine provocation test (HIST) (controls). Results: In athletes, elevated FENO (>30ppb) was not associated with lung function-confirmed asthma or with MCH positivity, but receiver operating characteristics (ROC) analysis showed some predictive value for EVH positivity [Area Under Curve (AUC) 0.652, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.53 to 0.78, P=0.020]. However, the sensitivity (55%) and the specificity (71%) were poor. In sedentary patients, FENO was significantly associated with both confirmed asthma and HIST positivity, ROC analysis showing FENO to be significantly predictive for HIST positivity (AUC 0.83, 95% CI: 0.70 to 0.96, P=0.001) and for asthma (AUC 0.74, 95% CI: 0.63 to 0.85, P<0.001). Conclusion: The results suggest that in contrast to sedentary patients, FENO seems to be a poor predictor of BHR and of clinical asthma in elite athletes. We find it unlikely that FENO could be a useful screening tool in athletes with exercise-induced respiratory symptoms. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd. Source


Jussila A.-M.,UKK Institute for the Health Promotion Research | Vasankari T.,UKK Institute for the Health Promotion Research | Paronen O.,UKK Institute for the Health Promotion Research | Sievanen H.,UKK Institute for the Health Promotion Research | And 5 more authors.
BMC Public Health | Year: 2015

Background: Adolescents' physical activity (PA) is decreasing and sedentary behavior (SB) increasing alarmingly. Insufficient PA and excessive SB are both related to various health risks indicating that interventions to promote adolescents' PA and to reduce their SB are needed. Schools have a great potential to reach most adolescents, and in Finland health education (HE) as stand-alone subject provides an excellent platform for health promotion. This paper describes the protocol and evaluation (RE-AIM) of an intervention developed for three HE lessons to increase PA and reduce SB during leisure among 8th graders. Methods/Design: All city-owned secondary schools in Tampere (n∈=∈14) were invited to the study and were randomized in pairs to intervention (n∈=∈7) and comparison group (n∈=∈7). A specific content on PA and SB based on Health Action Process Approach model was integrated into routinely scheduled three HE lessons with the help of educational material: SoftGIS-questionnaire followed by feedback views on adolescents' current PA and SB, FeetEnergy-homework leaflet for adolescents, FeetEnergy-video in YouTube, FeetEnergy-poster for classroom and FeetEnergy-leaflet for parents. In the comparison group standard HE lessons were held. The primary indicators of Effectiveness are changes in PA and SB and in their psychosocial factors as well as in parental interference with PA and SB. The measurement points are baseline, 4 weeks after the intervention and 7 months from baseline, the last indicating also the measurement point for individual level Maintenance. The measures are accelerometers, 7-day activity diaries and questionnaires. The evaluation of Reach, Adoption and Implementation is based on the data collected during the intervention. Maintenance at organizational level is assessed two years after the intervention with a questionnaire to the HE teachers. The intervention was implemented in 2012 and the last measurements to assess organizational Maintenance were conducted in the end of 2014. A detailed description of the protocol and evaluation is provided to enable replication and better understanding of the findings, which will be reported in 2015. Discussion: The findings will add our current knowledge about the feasibility and effectiveness of integrating simple structured elements into the HE lessons to increase PA and reduce SB in adolescents. Trial registration: NCT01633918 (June 27th, 2012) © 2015 Jussila et al. Source


Jussila A.-M.,UKK Institute for the Health Promotion Research | Vasankari T.,UKK Institute for the Health Promotion Research | Paronen O.,UKK Institute for the Health Promotion Research | Sievanen H.,UKK Institute for the Health Promotion Research | And 4 more authors.
BMC Public Health | Year: 2015

Background: Adolescents' physical activity (PA) is decreasing and sedentary behavior (SB) increasing alarmingly. Insufficient PA and excessive SB are both related to various health risks indicating that interventions to promote adolescents' PA and to reduce their SB are needed. Schools have a great potential to reach most adolescents, and in Finland health education (HE) as stand-alone subject provides an excellent platform for health promotion. This paper describes the protocol and evaluation (RE-AIM) of an intervention developed for three HE lessons to increase PA and reduce SB during leisure among 8th graders. Methods/Design: All city-owned secondary schools in Tampere (n = 14) were invited to the study and were randomized in pairs to intervention (n = 7) and comparison group (n = 7). A specific content on PA and SB based on Health Action Process Approach model was integrated into routinely scheduled three HE lessons with the help of educational material: SoftGIS-questionnaire followed by feedback views on adolescents' current PA and SB, FeetEnergy-homework leaflet for adolescents, FeetEnergy-video in YouTube, FeetEnergy-poster for classroom and FeetEnergy-leaflet for parents. In the comparison group standard HE lessons were held. The primary indicators of Effectiveness are changes in PA and SB and in their psychosocial factors as well as in parental interference with PA and SB. The measurement points are baseline, 4 weeks after the intervention and 7 months from baseline, the last indicating also the measurement point for individual level Maintenance. The measures are accelerometers, 7-day activity diaries and questionnaires. The evaluation of Reach, Adoption and Implementation is based on the data collected during the intervention. Maintenance at organizational level is assessed two years after the intervention with a questionnaire to the HE teachers. The intervention was implemented in 2012 and the last measurements to assess organizational Maintenance were conducted in the end of 2014. A detailed description of the protocol and evaluation is provided to enable replication and better understanding of the findings, which will be reported in 2015. Discussion: The findings will add our current knowledge about the feasibility and effectiveness of integrating simple structured elements into the HE lessons to increase PA and reduce SB in adolescents. Trial registration: NCT01633918 (June 27th, 2012). © 2015 Jussila et al. Source

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