The Technion

Haifa, Israel

The Technion

Haifa, Israel

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Fifteen new government and education customers now benefitting from increased performance and efficiency, resulting from deploying Reduxio's flash storage solution SAN FRANCISCO, CA--(Marketwired - Feb 16, 2017) -  In the past twelve months, sales of Reduxio Systems' flash storage solution has seen rapid growth in the education and government sectors with 15 new customers, including the University of Georgia and The Technion Institute of Technology, often referred to as the MIT of Israel. Reduxio's success has been, in part, due to its ability to remove the typical barriers faced by these customers with a simple-to-deploy and manage high performance flash storage system, which enabled users to not only accelerate application performance and simplify administration, but also to realize an up to 50 percent reduction in cost per Gigabyte (GB) relative to legacy storage. In addition, Reduxio's unique BackDating™ technology provides peace of mind to administrators, knowing that they can recover their data to any second. Many governmental and educational institutions today are at a crossroads: they are committed to digital transformation with more applications, databases and websites as well as virtualized environments, but they are forced to deal with outdated data storage infrastructure that is complex and expensive to operate, manage, and protect. On top of that, most states are cutting funding to universities and in turn, officials are having to lay off faculty and staff members, postpone investment in new facilities and raise tuition and fees. Due to these budget cuts, many governmental and educational institutions are looking for cost-effective solutions that can be implemented quickly to meet their current storage demands, simplify administration, and can scale to address their future needs. "The growth we're seeing with our education and government customers is remarkable, but hardly surprising, as more IT managers in these sectors are realizing that Reduxio is incomparable from a cost-benefit standpoint," said Mark Weiner, co-founder and CEO of Reduxio. "Reduxio's core value proposition is in providing our customers with a flexible solution to data storage and protection that can be implemented rapidly, and delivers unique capabilities like BackDating™ that are not available on any other storage system in the market. We're proud that our technology is making such a difference for these customers." Reduxio's HX550™ multi-tier storage solution with built-in BackDating™ allows customers to modernize and simplify their storage infrastructure and IT operations by deploying flash storage that is cost-effective and that can be used across all their applications. Benefits vary, but in the case of the El Dorado County Office of Education (EDCOE), these include 60 percent faster recovery times; three times more capacity using in-line, in-memory dedupe and compression; and 50 percent lower price per GB. In addition, Reduxio's StorSense™ cloud based support and analytics platform collects telemetry data from all systems, enabling the customer to proactively detect issues and allowing for remote resolution. The Technion Institute of Technology is Israel's first university and is considered one of the world's top institutions for engineering and science education. It is affiliated with four Nobel Laureates and is consistently ranked amongst the top 100 universities in the world. Technion chose Reduxio's technology to address the university's time consuming process for rolling out SAP EhP upgrades. After deploying the Reduxio HX550 to its SAP test/dev environment, Technion was immediately able to take advantage of BackDating to reduce the time to roll out new environments, improving overall performance. Today, the system is used as part of the SAP landscape for I/O intensive applications. "Reduxio's BackDating feature gave our developers great flexibility to move back and forth in time in the development process," said Zeev Schneider, director of IT infrastructures, Technion. "We realized the impact of Reduxio's technology immediately and we're pleased with the rate at which we're able to backup and restore our database, which is night and day compared to our old storage technology." Also in 2016, Reduxio began working with the University of Georgia's (UGA) Athletic Association. Currently, UGA is ranked 18th overall among all public national universities according to U.S. News & World Report. Jeff Daniel, IT director of the UGA's Athletic Association uses the Reduxio flash solution to host the virtual desktop infrastructure (VDI) environment for the entire department. "Reduxio has delivered a 20:1 data deduplication ratio, which has allowed us to deliver extremely high VDI performance to our students and staff," said Daniel. "Reduxio's world class support, at both the local level and though its global support center, has been simply outstanding. Although we are just beginning to understand and utilize the product and are nowhere near the product's potential, we absolutely made the right choice in partnering with Reduxio and plan to place our entire production environment on this platform." In addition to the UGA, Technion and EDCOE, Reduxio began deploying its solution with the following public schools: Abington Public Schools; Plymouth High School; Brimmer & May School; Weymouth Public Schools; and Manchester Essex Regional School District. Reduxio's technology is also being deployed among the following governmental agencies: The Barnstable Police Department, The City of Thousand Oaks and The Last Mile, a program for prisoners at the San Quentin State Prison, California launched by the California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation. About Reduxio: Reduxio delivers high performance enterprise storage solutions with unique data management capabilities enabled by the Reduxio TimeOS™, a new storage operating system. Reduxio TimeOS™ puts data at the middle of its architecture and allows complete virtualization of all types of storage delivering the most effective storage for the most demanding enterprise applications. Reduxio is backed by Seagate Technology PLC, a world leader in storage solutions, Jerusalem Venture Partners (JVP), Carmel Ventures and Intel. Learn more at www.Reduxio.com and follow us on Twitter and LinkedIn.


News Article | April 25, 2017
Site: www.rdmag.com

Aerospace engineers at the Technion-Israel Institute of Technology have developed and patented a process that can be used onboard aircraft while in flight to produce hydrogen from water and aluminum particles safely and cheaply. The hydrogen can then be converted into electrical energy for inflight use. The breakthrough could pave the way for non-polluting, more-electric aircraft that replace current hydraulic and pneumatic systems typically powered by the main engine. The groundbreaking work was reported in a recent paper published in the International Journal of Hydrogen Energy. “Hydrogen produced onboard the aircraft during flight can be channeled to a fuel cell for electrical energy generation,” said lead researcher Dr. Shani Elitzur of the Technion Faculty of Aerospace Engineering. “This technology offers a good solution to several challenges, such as hydrogen storage, without the problems associated with storing hydrogen in a liquid or gas state.” While the use of hydrogen fuels has been a potential greener energy solution for some time, storing hydrogen has always been a problem. The engineers were able to work around the hydrogen storage problem by using non-polluting Proton Exchange Membrane (PEM) fuel cells and a process of aluminum activation patented by the paper’s co-authors, Prof. Alon Gany and Dr. Valery Rosenband. Dr. Elitzur’s research was focused on the reaction between the activated aluminum powder and water (from different types) to produce hydrogen. The foundation for the technology is in the chemical reaction between aluminum powder and water to produce hydrogen. Either fresh water or waste water, already onboard the aircraft, can be used for activation, which means the aircraft does not need to carry any additional water. The spontaneous and sustained reaction between powdered aluminum and water is enabled by a special thermo-chemical process of aluminum activation the researchers developed. The protective properties of the oxide or hydroxide film covering the aluminum particle surface are modified by a small fraction of lithium-based activator diffused into aluminum bulk, allowing water at room temperature to react spontaneously with the aluminum. The process does generate heat, which the researchers say can be used for a number of tasks, including heating water and food in the galley, de-icing operations, or heating aircraft fuel prior to starting the engines. According to the researchers, their technology would provide: “The possibility of using available, onboard wastewater boosts both the efficiency and safety of the system,” explained Dr. Rosenband. “Also, the PEM fuel cells exhibit high efficiency in electric energy generation.” Aircraft manufacturers, including Boeing and Airbus, have already investigated using onboard fuel cells. Boeing has experimented with them in smaller aircraft, in anticipation of using them on its 787-8, the current state-of-the-art electric airplane. According to the Technion researchers, fuel cells can even play an energy saving role in airline and airport ground support operations when they are on used for systems such as de-icing and runway light towers. “Efficient hydrogen production and storage represents the future for efficient and safe aircraft inflight energy needs.” summarized Prof. Gany. The Technion-Israel Institute of Technology is a major source of the innovation and brainpower that drives the Israeli economy, and a key to Israel’s renown as the world’s “Start-Up Nation.” Its three Nobel Prize winners exemplify academic excellence. Technion people, ideas and inventions make immeasurable contributions to the world including life-saving medicine, sustainable energy, computer science, water conservation and nanotechnology. The Joan and Irwin Jacobs Technion-Cornell Institute is a vital component of Cornell Tech, and a model for graduate applied science education that is expected to transform New York City’s economy. American Technion Society (ATS) donors provide critical support for the Technion—more than $2 billion since its inception in 1940. Based in New York City, the ATS and its network of supporters across the U.S. provide funds for scholarships, fellowships, faculty recruitment and chairs, research, buildings, laboratories, classrooms and dormitories, and more.


Fecher H.,Albert Ludwigs University of Freiburg | Shoham S.,The Technion
International Journal on Software Tools for Technology Transfer | Year: 2011

A key technique for the verification of programs is counterexample-guided abstraction-refinement (CEGAR). Grumberg et al. (LNCS, vol 3385, pp. 233-249. Springer, Berlin, 2005; Inf Comput 205(8):1130-1148, 2007) developed a CEGAR-based algorithm for the modal μ-calculus. There, every abstract state is split in a refinement step. In this paper, the work of Grumberg et al. is generalized by presenting a new CEGAR-based algorithm for the μ-calculus. It is based on a more expressive abstract model and applies refinement only locally (at a single abstract state), i. e., the lazy abstraction technique for safety properties is adapted to the μ-calculus. Furthermore, it separates refinement determination from the (3-valued based) model checking. Three different heuristics for refinement determination are presented and illustrated. © 2011 Springer-Verlag.


News Article | November 15, 2016
Site: www.sciencedaily.com

Researchers at the Technion-Israel Institute of Technology have developed a technology that could improve the efficiency of photovoltaic cells by nearly 70 percent. The breakthrough could be a key for overcoming current technological limitations to harnessing solar power to meet the world's energy consumption demands. The study was conducted at the Excitonics Lab, headed by Professor Carmel Rotschild, in the Technion Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, with assistance from the Grand Technion Energy Program and the Russell Berrie Nanotechnology Institute at the Technion, and as part of the lab's European Research Council (ERC) RC project on new thermodynamic tools for solar cells. Photovoltaic cells optimally utilize a very narrow range of the solar spectrum -- the broad light supplied by the sun. Radiation not within this narrow range merely warms these cells, and is not utilized. This energy loss limits the maximum efficiency of current solar cells to around 30%. In a paper recently published in Nature Communications, the Technion researchers describe how their technology is based on an intermediate process that occurs between sunlight and the photovoltaic cell. The photoluminescence material they created absorbs the radiation from the sun, and converts the heat and light from the sun into an "ideal" radiation, which illuminates the photovoltaic cell and enables higher conversion efficiency. As a result, the device's efficiency is increased from 30% to 50%. The inspiration for the technology comes from optical refrigeration, where the absorbed light is re-emitted at higher energy, thereby cooling the emitter. The Technion technology works similarly, but with sunlight. "Solar radiation, on its way to the photovoltaic cells, hits a dedicated material that we developed for this purpose, and the material is heated by the unused part of the spectrum," says graduate student Assaf Manor, who led the study as part of his PhD work. "In addition, the solar radiation in the optimal spectrum is absorbed and re-emitted at a blue-shifted spectrum. This radiation is then harvested by the solar cell, and both the heat and the light are converted to electricity."


News Article | November 28, 2016
Site: phys.org

Assaf Manor, Assistant Professor Carmel Rotschild and Nimrod Kruger at the lab. Credit: Technion Technion researchers have developed a technology that could improve the efficiency of photovoltaic cells by nearly 70 percent. The study was conducted at the Excitonics Lab, headed by Assistant Professor Carmel Rotschild at the Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, with the assistance of the Grand Technion Energy Program (GTEP) and the Russell Berrie Nanotechnology Institute (RBNI) at the Technion, and as part of the lab's ERC project on new thermodynamic tools for solar cells. The sun is a powerful source of renewable energy. In fact, it is currently the only energy source capable of supplying the energy consumption of the human race, so it's no wonder that the use of solar energy is increasing. But there are currently a number of technological limitations when it comes to photovoltaic cell efficiency. Photovoltaic cells optimally utilize a very narrow range of the solar spectrum – the broad light supplied by the sun; radiation not within this narrow range merely warms these cells and is not utilized. This energy loss limits the maximum efficiency of current solar cells to around 30%. The Technion team's method is based on an intermediate process that occurs between sunlight and the photovoltaic cell. The photoluminescence material they created absorbs the radiation from the sun, and converts the heat and light from the sun into an "ideal" radiation, which illuminates the photovoltaic cell, enabling higher conversion efficiency. As a result, the device's efficiency is increased from 30% (the conventional value for photovoltaic devices), to 50%. The inspiration for the breakthrough comes from optical refrigeration, where the absorbed light is re-emitted at higher energy, thereby cooling the emitter. The researchers developed a technology that works similarly, but with sunlight. "Solar radiation, on its way to the photovoltaic cells, hits a dedicated material that we developed for this purpose, the material is heated by the unused part of the spectrum," says graduate student Assaf Manor, who led the study as part of his PhD work. "In addition, the solar radiation in the optimal spectrum is absorbed and re-emitted at a blue-shifted spectrum. This radiation is then harvested by the solar cell. This way both the heat and the light are converted to electricity." The group hopes to demonstrate a full operating device with record efficiency within 5 years' time. If they are successful, they feel could become a disruptive technology in solar energy. The study is published in Nature Communications. Explore further: Hybrid solar cell converts both light and heat from sun's rays into electricity More information: Assaf Manor et al. Thermally enhanced photoluminescence for heat harvesting in photovoltaics, Nature Communications (2016). DOI: 10.1038/ncomms13167


News Article | November 28, 2016
Site: cleantechnica.com

A research team from Technion — the Israel Institute of Technology — is on to a new solar cell approach that could put the Shockley-Queisser conversion efficiency limit to rest once and for all. That’s great news for clean energy fans who are concerned that the incoming Donald J. Trump administration will cut US funding for foundational solar energy research that leads to improved efficiency and falling costs. After all, if the US drops the ball, Israel, or for that matter, China, Switzerland, Japan, South Korea, and other top players around the globe have already picked it up. For those of you new to the topic, solar cell efficiency refers to the ability of a material to convert sunlight to an electric current. There is plenty of room in the marketplace for low-efficiency solar cell materials. One example is the emerging class of thin film solar cells, which can be integrated into windows and other surfaces. However, for utility scale installations, small scale rooftop solar arrays, and many other applications, a high efficiency solution is more compact and economical. For space travel and other specialty uses, you can just throw economy out the window and go for the highest efficiency possible, regardless of cost. Either way, the hunt has been on for new materials — and combinations of materials — that fit the high efficiency bill. The problem is that solar cell efficiency is limited by the fact that when solar cells absorb sunlight, they also collect a lot of heat, which dissipates in the form of lost energy. This dissipation is what the Shockley-Queisser efficiency limit refers to. The theory is that under optimal sunlight, the maximum conversion efficiency for a single solar cell material is 41%. More generally the Shockley-Queisser limit is a little over 30%. It is possible to reclaim some of that heat energy before it dissipates, but engineering a device that can tolerate the high level of heat is a problem. According to the Technion team, research in the solar thermalphotovoltaics (that is, sunlight plus heat plus light-induced electricity) field has been ongoing for more than 30 years, and so far researchers have little to show for their efforts: After over thirty years of research, the record conversion efficiency for STPV [solar thermalphotovoltaics] stands at 3.2% for an absorber operating temperature of 1,285 K. The Technion team claims a conversion efficiency of 50% for their new solar cell, or an improvement of about 70% over the “conventional value” of 30%. So how’d they do that? Here’s the explainer from the study, published last month in the journal Nature: Here heat is harvested by a low bandgap photoluminescent absorber that emits thermally enhanced photoluminescence towards a higher bandgap photovoltaic cell, resulting in a maximum theoretical efficiency of 70% at a temperature of 1,140 K. Did you get all that? The Technion Foundation offers a more descriptive take: “Solar radiation, on its way to the photovoltaic cells, hits a dedicated material that we developed for this purpose, and the material is heated by the unused part of the spectrum,” says graduate student Assaf Manor, who led the study as part of his PhD work. “In addition, the solar radiation in the optimal spectrum is absorbed and re-emitted at a blue-shifted spectrum…” “Blue-shifted” refers to shorter wavelengths, which can then be harvested by the solar cell. The end effect is that the cell can convert heat as well as light to an electrical current. Don’t run right out to Home Depot for your advanced STPV solar cell. The research team expects to work on the new device for another five years ago before it’s up to speed. Meanwhile, if you’d like to read up on solar thermalphotovoltaics, CleanTechnica also covered the topic back in 2014 under the title, “Solar Thermophotovoltaics — Getting To 80% Efficiency.” For another approach to breaking the Shockley-Queisser barrier, check out this new research from Drexel University with an assist from the inventor of the photocopier. Follow me on Twitter and Google+. Buy a cool T-shirt or mug in the CleanTechnica store!   Keep up to date with all the hottest cleantech news by subscribing to our (free) cleantech daily newsletter or weekly newsletter, or keep an eye on sector-specific news by getting our (also free) solar energy newsletter, electric vehicle newsletter, or wind energy newsletter.


Kantor E.,The Technion | Lotker Z.,Ben - Gurion University of the Negev | Parter M.,Weizmann Institute of Science | Peleg D.,Weizmann Institute of Science
Proceedings of the Annual ACM Symposium on Theory of Computing | Year: 2011

In this paper we study the topological properties of wireless communication maps and their usability in algorithmic design. We consider the SINR model, which compares the received power of a signal at a receiver against the sum of strengths of other interfering signals plus background noise. To describe the behavior of a multi-station network, we use the convenient representation of a reception map. In the SINR model, the resulting SINR diagram partitions the plane into reception zones, one per station, and the complementary region of the plane where no station can be heard. SINR diagrams have been studied in [3] for the specific case where all stations use the same power. It is shown that the reception zones are convex (hence connected) and fat, and this is used to devise an efficient algorithm for the fundamental problem of point location. Here we consider the more general (and common) case where transmission energies are arbitrary (or non-uniform). Under that setting, the reception zones are not necessarily convex or even connected. This poses the algorithmic challenge of designing efficient point location techniques for the non-uniform setting, as well as the theoretical challenge of understanding the geometry of SINR diagrams (e.g., the maximal number of connected components they might have). We achieve several results in both directions. We establish a form of weaker convexity in the case where stations are aligned on a line and use this to derive a tight bound on the number of connected components in this case. In addition, one of our key results concerns the behavior of a (d+1)-dimensional map, i.e., a map in one dimension higher than the dimension in which stations are embedded. Specifically, although the d-dimensional map might be highly fractured, drawing the map in one dimension higher "heals" the zones, which become connected (in fact hyperbolically connected). In addition, as a step toward establishing a weaker form of convexity for the d-dimensional map, we study the interference function and show that it satisfies the maximum principle. This is done through an analysis technique based on looking at the behavior of systems composed on lines of densely placed weak stations, as the number of stations tends to infinity, keeping their total transmission energy fixed. Finally, we turn to consider algorithmic applications, and propose a new variant of approximate point location. © 2011 ACM.


Crawford N.,The Technion
Communications in Mathematical Physics | Year: 2014

Consider the classical XY model in a weak random external field pointing along the Y axis with strength {Mathematical expression}. We prove that the model defined on {Mathematical expression} with nearest neighbor coupling exhibits residual magnetic order in the horizontal direction for arbitrarily weak random field strengths and, depending on field strength, sufficiently low temperature. © 2014 Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg.


Pinchasi R.,The Technion
Discrete and Computational Geometry | Year: 2015

Let F be a family of geometric objects in (Formula presented.) such that the complexity (number of faces of all dimensions on the boundary) of the union of any m of them is o(mk). We show that F, as well as (Formula presented.) for any given set (Formula presented.), have fractional Helly number at most k. This improves the known bounds for fractional Helly numbers of many families. © 2015, Springer Science+Business Media New York.


Crawford N.,The Technion
Journal of Statistical Physics | Year: 2011

Consider the classical XY model in a weak random external field pointing along the Y axis with strength ε. We study the behavior of this model as the range of the interaction is varied. We prove that in any dimension d ≥ 2 and for all ε sufficiently small, there is a range L=L(ε) so that whenever the inverse temperature β is larger than some β(ε), there is strong residual ordering along the X direction. © 2010 Springer Science+Business Media, LLC.

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