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Lashkari H.P.,The Royal Marsden Hospital NHS Trust | Nash R.,St Georges Healthcare Nhs Trust | Albanese A.,The Royal Marsden Hospital NHS Trust | Albanese A.,St Georges Healthcare Nhs Trust | And 6 more authors.
Pediatric Blood and Cancer | Year: 2013

Sertoli-Leydig cell tumors are rare ovarian neoplasms. We report two unusual cases with bilateral SLCTs suggesting evidence of genetic predisposition and at high risk of recurrence. To reduce this risk, we exploited the use of GnRH analog to lower gondadotropin and potentially directly inhibit the tumors through expressed GnRH receptors. We used it as maintenance antitumor therapy for 2 years after completion of chemotherapy, to cover the period of risk for recurrence. Both patients remain in complete remission at >2 years after completing leuprorelin therapy. Of note, both patients carry DICER1 mutations, frequently found in pleuropulmonary blastoma syndrome. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.


O'Leary B.,The Royal Marsden Hospital NHS Trust | O'Leary B.,The Institute of Cancer Research | Mandeville H.C.,The Royal Marsden Hospital NHS Trust | Fersht N.,University College London | And 5 more authors.
Journal of Neuro-Oncology | Year: 2016

There is no standard treatment for glioblastoma with elements of PNET (GBM-PNET). Conventional treatment for glioblastoma is surgery followed by focal radiotherapy with concurrent temozolomide. Given the increased propensity for neuroaxial metastases seen with GBM-PNETs, craniospinal irradiation (CSI) with temozolomide (TMZ) could be a feasible treatment option but little is known regarding its toxicity. The clinical records of all patients treated at two UK neuro-oncology centres with concurrent CSI and TMZ were examined for details of surgery, radiotherapy, chemotherapy and toxicities related to the CSI-TMZ component of their treatment. Eight patients were treated with CSI-TMZ, the majority (6/8) for GBM-PNET. All patients completed radiotherapy to the craniospinal axis 35–40 Gy in 20–24 daily fractions with a focal boost to the tumour of 14–23.4 Gy in 8–13 daily fractions. Concurrent TMZ was administered at 75 mg/m2 for seven of the cohort, with the other patient receiving 50 mg/m2. The most commonly observed non-haematological toxicities were nausea and vomiting, with all patients experiencing at least grade 2 symptoms of either or both. All patients had at least grade 3 lymphopaenia. Two patients experience grade 4 neutropaenia and grade 3 thrombocytopaenia. Three of the eight patients required omission of TMZ for part of their chemoradiotherapy and 3/8 required hospital admission at some point during chemoradiotherapy. The addition of TMZ to CSI did not interrupt radiotherapy. Principal toxicities were neutropaenia, lymphopaenia, thrombocytopaenia, nausea and vomiting. Treatment with CSI-TMZ merits further investigation and may be suitable for patients with tumours at high-risk of metastatic spread throughout the CNS who have TMZ-sensitive pathologies. © 2016 Springer Science+Business Media New York


PubMed | The Royal Marsden Hospital NHS Trust and University College London
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Journal of neuro-oncology | Year: 2016

There is no standard treatment for glioblastoma with elements of PNET (GBM-PNET). Conventional treatment for glioblastoma is surgery followed by focal radiotherapy with concurrent temozolomide. Given the increased propensity for neuroaxial metastases seen with GBM-PNETs, craniospinal irradiation (CSI) with temozolomide (TMZ) could be a feasible treatment option but little is known regarding its toxicity. The clinical records of all patients treated at two UK neuro-oncology centres with concurrent CSI and TMZ were examined for details of surgery, radiotherapy, chemotherapy and toxicities related to the CSI-TMZ component of their treatment. Eight patients were treated with CSI-TMZ, the majority (6/8) for GBM-PNET. All patients completed radiotherapy to the craniospinal axis 35-40 Gy in 20-24 daily fractions with a focal boost to the tumour of 14-23.4 Gy in 8-13 daily fractions. Concurrent TMZ was administered at 75 mg/m(2) for seven of the cohort, with the other patient receiving 50 mg/m(2). The most commonly observed non-haematological toxicities were nausea and vomiting, with all patients experiencing at least grade 2 symptoms of either or both. All patients had at least grade 3 lymphopaenia. Two patients experience grade 4 neutropaenia and grade 3 thrombocytopaenia. Three of the eight patients required omission of TMZ for part of their chemoradiotherapy and 3/8 required hospital admission at some point during chemoradiotherapy. The addition of TMZ to CSI did not interrupt radiotherapy. Principal toxicities were neutropaenia, lymphopaenia, thrombocytopaenia, nausea and vomiting. Treatment with CSI-TMZ merits further investigation and may be suitable for patients with tumours at high-risk of metastatic spread throughout the CNS who have TMZ-sensitive pathologies.


PubMed | The Royal Marsden Hospital NHS Trust
Type: Clinical Trial | Journal: Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology | Year: 2011

To assess magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and pathologic staging after neoadjuvant therapy for rectal cancer in a prospectively enrolled, multicenter study.In a prospective cohort study, 111 patients who had rectal cancer treated by neoadjuvant therapy were assessed for response by MRI and pathology staging by T, N and circumferential resection margin (CRM) status. Tumor regression grade (TRG) was also assessed by MRI. Overall survival (OS) was estimated by using the Kaplan-Meier product-limit method, and Cox proportional hazards models were used to determine associations between staging of good and poor responders on MRI or pathology and survival outcomes after controlling for patient characteristics.On multivariate analysis, the MRI-assessed TRG (mrTRG) hazard ratios (HRs) were independently significant for survival (HR, 4.40; 95% CI, 1.65 to 11.7) and disease-free survival (DFS; HR, 3.28; 95% CI, 1.22 to 8.80). Five-year survival for poor mrTRG was 27% versus 72% (P = .001), and DFS for poor mrTRG was 31% versus 64% (P = .007). Preoperative MRI-predicted CRM independently predicted local recurrence (LR; HR, 4.25; 95% CI, 1.45 to 12.51). Five-year survival for poor post-treatment pathologic T stage (ypT) was 39% versus 76% (P = .001); DFS for the same was 38% versus 84% (P = .001); and LR for the same was 27% versus 6% (P = .018). The 5-year survival for involved pCRM was 30% versus 59% (P = .001); DFS, 28 versus 62% (P = .02); and LR, 56% versus 10% (P = .001). Pathology node status did not predict outcomes.MRI assessment of TRG and CRM are imaging markers that predict survival outcomes for good and poor responders and provide an opportunity for the multidisciplinary team to offer additional treatment options before planning definitive surgery. Postoperative histopathology assessment of ypT and CRM but not post-treatment N status were important postsurgical predictors of outcome.

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