The Royal Danish Academy of Fine Arts, School of Design

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Roskilde, Denmark
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Beim A.,The Royal Danish Academy of Fine Arts, School of Design | Hvejsel M.,University of Aalborg
Structures and Architecture - Proceedings of the 3rd International Conference on Structures and Architecture, ICSA 2016 | Year: 2016

Can material interest and tectonic aspiration inform the urban scale and how can urban context call for tectonic qualities in ordinary buildings? Can we speak of an ‘ecology of urban tectonics’ where the scale of the urban context relates to the tectonic scale of construction details? These questions are examined in selected work by the Danish Architect, Hans Christian Hansen (1901-1978). His buildings hold a strong building culture that is deeply rooted in a regional understanding of materials, traditions of construction and the urban context. Hansen addressed construction and material use in ordinary buildings and translated the challenges of contemporary building industry into long lasting architectural designs. One could argue that his buildings define an ecological tectonic imperative by addressing the urban scale in a direct unimpressed, but highly original manner - in this case defined as an ‘urban tectonic’ approach. The paper analyses two ordinary building to discuss whether Hansen’s ‘urban tectonic’ can inform the challenges of todays everyday architecture - a growing inability to utilize construction elements as spatial features that link the urban fabric to the human scale. © 2016 Taylor & Francis Group, London.


Beim A.,The Royal Danish Academy of Fine Arts, School of Design | Hvejsel M.,University of Aalborg
Structures and Architecture - Proceedings of the 3rd International Conference on Structures and Architecture, ICSA 2016 | Year: 2016

General dwellings and workplaces are realized under increasing economical pressure mainly controlled by the construction industry and often they are experienced as pragmatic structures rather than appealing architectural spaces. However, particularly in ‘everyday architecture’ there is a need to conceive structural elements, i.e. walls, façades, windows etc. as spatial gestures. This challenge calls for a redefinition of the architectural task and responsibility within this context, and it is our hypothesis that the notion of tectonics holds a unique potential in this matter having the capacity of being a spatial theory of construction. Consequently, we ask if ‘everyday architecture’ can be qualified by means of tectonic method? To answer this question entails a clarification of concepts that is pursued through a rereading of Henri Lefebvre’s essay ‘The everyday and everydayness’. As a result the paper outlines a conceptual and strategic link between the notion of ‘everyday architecture’ and practices of ‘tectonics’ method. © 2016 Taylor & Francis Group, London.


Lee D.S.-H.,The Royal Danish Academy of Fine Arts, School of Design | Naboni E.,The Royal Danish Academy of Fine Arts, School of Design
Procedia Engineering | Year: 2017

The paper presents a research exploring the thermal mass effect of reinforced concrete beams with structurally optimised geometrical forms. Fully exposed concrete soffits in architectural contexts create more than just visual impacts on the indoor climate through their possible interferences with light, sound and thermal conditions. It is considered that the characteristics of interferences would have close relationship with material and geometrical properties of the soffits; especially when the soffits are other than flat form. In the current investigation the relationship between the thermal mass effect (and the implication on thermal comfort) and the given geometrical parameters of exposed soffit reinforced concrete beams are explored. The geometrical parameters of the beams are initially defined in means of structural optimisation. The beams consist of flange and web in likeness of T-sectioned beams. However, both flange and web are curved vertically for the required bending and shear capacity of the sections. At the same time, the web is also curved horizontally for increased shear capacities. In the research, both the vertical and horizontal geometrical parameters are varied to observe the resultant heat exchange behaviour, and the implication on thermal comfort indoor environment. However, the current paper presents the thermal mass characteristics of one geometrical type. The study is based on results derived from computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis, where Rhino 3D is used for geometrical modelling of the beams and office space. © 2017 The Authors.


Sanders K.L.,University of Adelaide | Schroeder T.,University of Adelaide | Guinea M.L.,Charles Darwin University | Rasmussen A.R.,The Royal Danish Academy of Fine Arts, School of Design
PLoS ONE | Year: 2015

The critically endangered leaf-scaled (Aipysurus foliosquamaI) and short-nosed (A. apraefrontalis) sea snakes are currently recognised only from Ashmore and Hibernia reefs ∼600km off the northwest Australian coast. Steep population declines in both species were documented over 15 years and neither has been sighted on dedicated surveys of Ashmore and Hibernia since 2001. We examine specimens of these species that were collected fromcoastal northwest Australian habitats up until 2010 (A.foliosquama) and 2012 (A. apraefrontalis) and were either overlooked or treated as vagrants in conservation assessments.Morphological variation and mitochondrial sequence data confirm the assignment of these coastal specimens to A. foliosquama (Barrow Island, and offshore from Port Hedland) and A.apraefrontalis (Exmouth Gulf, and offshore from Roebourne and Broome). Collection dates, and molecular and morphological variation between coastal and offshore specimens, suggest that the coastal specimens are not vagrants as previously suspected, but instead represent separate breeding populations. The newly recognised populations present another chance for leaf-scaled and short-nosed sea snakes, but coastal habitats in northwest Australia are widely threatened by infrastructure developments and sea snakes are presently omitted from environmental impact assessments for industry. Further studies are urgently needed to assess these species' remaining distributions, population structure, and extent of occurrence in protected areas. © 2015 Sanders et al.


Hansen F.T.,The Royal Danish Academy of Fine Arts, School of Design | Jensen K.,University of Aalborg
International Journal of Arts and Technology | Year: 2014

This article presents SoundShaping, a system to create ceramics from the human voice and thus how digital technology makes new possibilities in ceramic craft. The article is about how experiential knowledge that the craftsmen gains in a direct physical and tactile interaction with a responding material can be transformed and utilised in the use of digital technologies. SoundShaping is based on a generic audio feature extraction system and the principal component analysis to ensure that the pertinent information in the voice is used. Moreover, 3D shape is created using simple geometric rules. The shape is output to a 3D printer to make ceramic results. The system demonstrates the close connection between digital technology and craft practice. Several experiments and reflections demonstrate the validity of this work. Copyright © 2014 Inderscience Enterprises Ltd.


Brandt E.,The Royal Danish Academy of Fine Arts, School of Design
ACM International Conference Proceeding Series | Year: 2012

This paper report on a project in a maximum-security prison in Denmark, where a group of officers and inmates engaged in a participatory design project aimed at improving the quality of everyday life. A series of participatory design workshops had two overall objectives: 1) to increase levels of trust and confidence in the prison, and 2) to learn how to engage inmates better in their everyday life inside prison, e.g. through engaging them in collective matters. The process of co-inquiry and co-creation provided a new social infrastructure, which allowed inmates and prison officers to access new roles and social positions. © 2012 ACM.


Hansen F.T.,The Royal Danish Academy of Fine Arts, School of Design | Jensen K.,University of Aalborg
Lecture Notes of the Institute for Computer Sciences, Social-Informatics and Telecommunications Engineering | Year: 2012

Digital technology makes new possibilities in ceramic craft. This project is about how experiential knowledge that the craftsmen gains in a direct physical and tactile interaction with a responding material can be transformed and utilized in the use of digital technologies. The project presents SoundShaping, a system to create ceramics from the human voice. Based on a generic audio feature extraction system, and the principal component analysis to ensure that the pertinent information in the voice is used, a 3D shape is created using simple geometric rules. This shape is output to a 3D printer to make ceramic results. The system demonstrates the close connection between digital technology and craft practice. © 2012 Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg.


Katzeff C.,Interactive Institute Swedish ICT | Broms L.,KTH Royal Institute of Technology | Jonsson L.,The Royal Danish Academy of Fine Arts, School of Design | Westholm U.,Interactive Institute Swedish ICT | Rasanen M.,Södertörn University College
ACM Transactions on Computer-Human Interaction | Year: 2013

People's domestic habits are increasingly being targeted to reduce levels of CO2 emissions. Whereas domestic energy consumption has received a lot of attention with several reported studies on sustainable practices, there are very few studies on workplace practices. Nevertheless, these are considered as having much potential for reducing energy consumption. This article presents the findings from two field studies where two different types of prototypes for visualizing energy use were designed, implemented and evaluated in different types of workplace settings - factories and offices. The studies used design probes to explore how visual feedback for electricity use was interpreted and acted upon by employees in work settings. A striking observation was that it is very difficult to get people to change to more pro-environmental behavior and practices in a workplace environment. The article discusses why this might be the case. © 2013 ACM 1073-0516/2013/11-ART31 $15.00.


Galle P.,The Royal Danish Academy of Fine Arts, School of Design | Kroes P.,Technical University of Delft
Design Studies | Year: 2014

Recently, Robert Farrell and Cliff Hooker opposed the conventional view that 'design and science are distinct types of intellectual study and production', claiming that science and design 'are not different in kind', and explicitly challenging proponents of the conventional view to 'provide explicit arguments' in its defence. This calls for an in-depth conceptual clarification of the science-design relationship. The aims of the present paper are to take up the gauntlet thrown by Farrell and Hooker, and in so doing, to provide such a clarification. We first analyse Farrell & Hooker's arguments, explaining why we find them unconvincing. We then propose a plausible conception of design versus science, and offer several arguments for considering design and science distinct, albeit related, concepts. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.


Galle P.,The Royal Danish Academy of Fine Arts, School of Design | Kroes P.,Technical University of Delft
Design Studies | Year: 2015

Design and science are distinct types of intellectual study and production. The overall subject matter that has been under debate is non-trivial and many-facetted: how to characterize and understand design, as compared to science. Because of the many facetted nature of the topic under discussion it is easy to get lost in details and to get confused about the precise claims that are being put forward. Apart from issues about validity of arguments, there are issues about the nature of the premises on which to base conclusions, when the bone of contention is the characterization of science and design as similar or distinct. Both sides in the debate may appeal to different kinds of evidence or may interpret the same kind of evidence in very different ways.

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