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Cortes N.J.,Portsmouth Hospitals National Health Service NHS Trust | Lloyd J.M.,The Royal Bournemouth and Christchurch Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust | Koziol L.,The Royal Bournemouth and Christchurch Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust | O'Hara L.,The Roy al Bournemouth and Christchurch Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust
Annals of Pharmacotherapy | Year: 2013

OBJECTIVE: To describe the safe and successful use of daptomycin-impregnated polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) bone cement in the treatment of a case of recurrent prosthetic joint infection in a patient with multiple antibiotic allergies and past colonization with multiply antibiotic-resistant organisms. CASE SUMMARY: A 79-year-old female had a history of chronic recurrent left prosthetic hip infection. The patient had confirmed allergies to multiple antibiotics and a past history of colonization with methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus. At first-stage revision surgery, the infected prosthesis was removed and samples were sent for microbiologic culture. A spacer device was fashioned, with incorporation of daptomycin and gentamicin into the PMMA bone cement at a concentration of 5% w/w for each antibiotic. Systemic daptomycin and gentamicin were administered postoperatively for 14 days. Propionibacterium acnes was isolated from deep-tissue specimens. The patient made excellent postoperative progress and was discharged after 2 weeks. Second-stage revision surgery was performed at 6 months, with no signs of persistent infection. She remained well, pain free, and mobilizing independently 2 years later. DISCUSSION: Daptomycin, a cyclic lipopeptide antibiotic, is approved for systemic treatment of endocarditis and skin and soft tissue infections. In vitro data demonstrate acceptable drug elution from and tensile strength of daptomycin- impregnated PMMA bone cement; however, clinical data are lacking. In our patient's case, the cement formulation was well tolerated, with no adverse effects detected, and demonstrated adequate mechanical strength in vivo. Infection with P. acnes, an unusual pathogen, was successfully treated. Further clinical studies are required to assess the efficacy of daptomycin-impregnated cement in infection with more typical pathogens, such as S. aureus. CONCLUSIONS: Daptomycin impregnation of PMMA bone cement may be an option in cases in which patient or pathogen factors preclude use of routinely incorporated agents. © 1967-2013 Harvey Whitney Books Co. All rights reserved.


Dushianthan A.,Portsmouth Hospitals NHS Trust Queen Alexandra Hospital | Dushianthan A.,University of Southampton | Cusack R.,University of Southampton | Chee N.,The Royal Bournemouth and Christchurch Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust | And 2 more authors.
BMC Anesthesiology | Year: 2014

Background: Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is a potentially devastating refractory hypoxemic illness with multi-organ involvement. Although several randomised controlled trials into ventilator and fluid management strategies have provided level 1 evidence to guide supportive therapy, there are few, established guidelines on how to manage patients with ARDS. In addition, and despite their continued use, pharmacotherapies for ARDS disease modulation have no proven benefit in improving mortality. Little is known however about the variability in diagnostic and treatment practices across the United Kingdom (UK). The aim of this survey, therefore, was to assess the use of diagnostic criteria and treatment strategies for ARDS in critical care units across the UK.Methods: The survey questionnaire was developed and internally piloted at University Hospital Southampton NHS Foundation Trust. Following ethical approval from University of Southampton Ethics and Research Committee, a link to an online survey engine (Survey Monkey) was then placed on the Intensive Care Society (UK) website. Fellows of The Intensive Care Society were subsequently personally approached via e-mail to encourage participation. The survey was conducted over a period of 3 months. Results: The survey received 191 responses from 125 critical care units, accounting for 11% of all registered intensive care physicians at The Intensive Care Society. The majority of the responses were from physicians managing general intensive care units (82%) and 34% of respondents preferred the American European Consensus Criteria for ARDS. There was a perceived decline in both incidence and mortality in ARDS. Primary ventilation strategies were based on ARDSnet protocols, though frequent deviations from ARDSnet positive end expiratory pressure (PEEP) recommendations (51%) were described. The majority of respondents set permissive blood gas targets (hypoxia (92%), hypercapnia (58%) and pH (90%)). The routine use of pharmacological agents is rare. Neuromuscular blockers and corticosteroids are considered occasionally and on a case-by-case basis. Routine (58%) or late (64%) tracheostomy was preferred to early tracheostomy insertion. Few centres offered routine follow-up or dedicated rehabilitation programmes following hospital discharge. Conclusions: There is substantial variation in the diagnostic and management strategies employed for patients with ARDS across the UK. National and/or international guidelines may help to improve standardisation in the management of ARDS. © 2014 Dushianthan et al.; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.


Mead A.J.,Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine | Milojkovic D.,Imperial College London | Knapper S.,University of Cardiff | Garg M.,Royal Infirmary | And 8 more authors.
British Journal of Haematology | Year: 2015

Myelofibrosis is characterized by splenomegaly and debilitating constitutional symptoms that negatively impact patients' quality of life. ROBUST, a UK, open-label, phase II study, evaluated the safety and efficacy of ruxolitinib in patients with myelofibrosis (N = 48), including intermediate-1 risk patients. The primary composite endpoint was the proportion of patients achieving treatment success [≥50% reduction in palpable spleen length and/or a ≥50% decrease in Myelofibrosis Symptom Assessment Form Total Symptom Score (MF-SAF TSS)] at 48 weeks. This was the first time that efficacy of ruxolitinib in myelofibrosis has been evaluated based on these criteria and the first time the MF-SAF was used in a population of patients solely from the United Kingdom. Overall, 50% of patients and 57% of intermediate-1 risk patients, achieved treatment success; reductions in spleen length and symptoms were observed in all risk groups. The majority of patients (66·7%) experienced ≥50% reductions from baseline in spleen length at any time. Improvements in MF-SAF TSS were seen in 80·0%, 72·7%, and 72·2% of intermediate-1, intermediate-2, and high-risk patients, respectively. Consistent with other studies of ruxolitinib, the most common haematological adverse events were anaemia and thrombocytopenia. Results indicate that most patients with myelofibrosis, including intermediate-1 risk patients, may benefit from ruxolitinib treatment. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.


Cidon E.U.,The Royal Bournemouth and Christchurch Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust | Ellis S.G.,The Royal Bournemouth and Christchurch Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust | Inam Y.,The Royal Bournemouth and Christchurch Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust | Adeleke S.,The Royal Bournemouth and Christchurch Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust | And 2 more authors.
Cancers | Year: 2013

Gastric cancer (GC) represents a major cancer burden worldwide, and remains the second leading cause of cancer-related death. Due to its insidious nature, presentation is usually late and often carries a poor prognosis. Despite having improved treatment modalities over the last decade, for most patients only modest improvements have been seen in overall survival. Recent progress in understanding the molecular biology of GC and its signaling pathways, offers the hope of clinically significant promising advances for selected groups of patients. Patients with Her-2 overexpression or amplification have experienced benefit from the integration of monoclonal antibodies such as trastuzumab to the standard chemotherapy. Additionally, drugs targeting angiogenesis (bevacizumab, sorafenib, sunitinib) are under investigation and other targeted agents such as mTOR inhibitors, anti c-MET, polo-like kinase 1 inhibitors are in preclinical or early clinical development. Patient selection and the development of reliable biomarkers to accurately select patients most likely to benefit from these tailored therapies is now key. Future trials should focus on these advances to optimize the treatment for GC patients. This article will review recent progress and current status of targeted agents in GC. © 2013 by the authors; licensee MDPI, Basel, Switzerland.


PubMed | The Royal Bournemouth and Christchurch Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Journal of neurology, neurosurgery, and psychiatry | Year: 2013

The effects of stroke-associated infection (SAI) on long-term survival are unclear. We performed a prospective evaluation to explore risk factors of SAI, and compared survival status over the 3 years following stroke onset between those who experienced SAI and those who did not.Consecutive patients with acute stroke admitted to a stroke unit between April 2005 and December 2006 were invited to participate. We prospectively collected data on demographics, pathological and clinical stroke subtype, stroke severity, and neurological and functional consequences, and abstracted additional data on occurrence and timing of SAI in hospital from medical notes. Survival status 3 years after stroke onset was obtained.We recruited 413 acute stroke patients, 161 (39%) experienced SAI. After excluding patients with infection at onset, patients with intracerebral haemorrhage (p=0.014), dysphagia (p=0.003) and urinary incontinence/catheterisation (p=0.000) were at higher risk of infection after controlling for case mix. The risk of death in hospital was greater following an SAI (HR 3.56; 95% CI 1.94 to 6.53; p=0.000), as was risk of death calculated over the whole 3-year follow-up period among those acquiring SAI within 2 weeks of onset (HR 1.66; 95% CI 1.14 to 2.40; p=0.031).SAIs have long-lasting effects on patient survival. This serves to emphasise the importance of immediate access to organised stroke unit care for people with acute stroke, with active physiological monitoring and protocols for early detection and treatment of SAIs.


PubMed | The Royal Bournemouth and Christchurch Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Cancers | Year: 2013

Gastric cancer (GC) represents a major cancer burden worldwide, and remains the second leading cause of cancer-related death. Due to its insidious nature, presentation is usually late and often carries a poor prognosis. Despite having improved treatment modalities over the last decade, for most patients only modest improvements have been seen in overall survival. Recent progress in understanding the molecular biology of GC and its signaling pathways, offers the hope of clinically significant promising advances for selected groups of patients. Patients with Her-2 overexpression or amplification have experienced benefit from the integration of monoclonal antibodies such as trastuzumab to the standard chemotherapy. Additionally, drugs targeting angiogenesis (bevacizumab, sorafenib, sunitinib) are under investigation and other targeted agents such as mTOR inhibitors, anti c-MET, polo-like kinase 1 inhibitors are in preclinical or early clinical development. Patient selection and the development of reliable biomarkers to accurately select patients most likely to benefit from these tailored therapies is now key. Future trials should focus on these advances to optimize the treatment for GC patients. This article will review recent progress and current status of targeted agents in GC.


PubMed | University of Southampton and The Royal Bournemouth and Christchurch Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust
Type: | Journal: BMC anesthesiology | Year: 2014

Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is a potentially devastating refractory hypoxemic illness with multi-organ involvement. Although several randomised controlled trials into ventilator and fluid management strategies have provided level 1 evidence to guide supportive therapy, there are few, established guidelines on how to manage patients with ARDS. In addition, and despite their continued use, pharmacotherapies for ARDS disease modulation have no proven benefit in improving mortality. Little is known however about the variability in diagnostic and treatment practices across the United Kingdom (UK). The aim of this survey, therefore, was to assess the use of diagnostic criteria and treatment strategies for ARDS in critical care units across the UK.The survey questionnaire was developed and internally piloted at University Hospital Southampton NHS Foundation Trust. Following ethical approval from University of Southampton Ethics and Research Committee, a link to an online survey engine (Survey Monkey) was then placed on the Intensive Care Society (UK) website. Fellows of The Intensive Care Society were subsequently personally approached via e-mail to encourage participation. The survey was conducted over a period of 3months.The survey received 191 responses from 125 critical care units, accounting for 11% of all registered intensive care physicians at The Intensive Care Society. The majority of the responses were from physicians managing general intensive care units (82%) and 34% of respondents preferred the American European Consensus Criteria for ARDS. There was a perceived decline in both incidence and mortality in ARDS. Primary ventilation strategies were based on ARDSnet protocols, though frequent deviations from ARDSnet positive end expiratory pressure (PEEP) recommendations (51%) were described. The majority of respondents set permissive blood gas targets (hypoxia (92%), hypercapnia (58%) and pH (90%)). The routine use of pharmacological agents is rare. Neuromuscular blockers and corticosteroids are considered occasionally and on a case-by-case basis. Routine (58%) or late (64%) tracheostomy was preferred to early tracheostomy insertion. Few centres offered routine follow-up or dedicated rehabilitation programmes following hospital discharge.There is substantial variation in the diagnostic and management strategies employed for patients with ARDS across the UK. National and/or international guidelines may help to improve standardisation in the management of ARDS.


PubMed | Birth Trauma Association., Bournemouth University, Bourenemouth University, NCT. and 2 more.
Type: Journal Article | Journal: The practising midwife | Year: 2014

The issue of whether women should be able to choose to give birth by caesarean section in the absence of pregnancy complications remains a controversial topic. To explore the issues and allow the public the opportunity to voice their views, academics at Bournemouth University organised a public debate on the pros and cons of allowing women free choice with regard to intervention. Two teams, each with a well-known user representative, an experienced practitioner and an academic, debated the motion: This house believes that women should be able to choose caesarean section on demand. This paper reports the debate and the public vote on the motion.


PubMed | University of Liverpool, Guys And St Thomas Nhs Foundation Trust, Imperial College London, Western General Hospital and 6 more.
Type: Clinical Trial, Phase II | Journal: British journal of haematology | Year: 2015

Myelofibrosis is characterized by splenomegaly and debilitating constitutional symptoms that negatively impact patients quality of life. ROBUST, a UK, open-label, phase II study, evaluated the safety and efficacy of ruxolitinib in patients with myelofibrosis (N = 48), including intermediate-1 risk patients. The primary composite endpoint was the proportion of patients achieving treatment success [ 50% reduction in palpable spleen length and/or a 50% decrease in Myelofibrosis Symptom Assessment Form Total Symptom Score (MF-SAF TSS)] at 48 weeks. This was the first time that efficacy of ruxolitinib in myelofibrosis has been evaluated based on these criteria and the first time the MF-SAF was used in a population of patients solely from the United Kingdom. Overall, 50% of patients and 57% of intermediate-1 risk patients, achieved treatment success; reductions in spleen length and symptoms were observed in all risk groups. The majority of patients (66.7%) experienced 50% reductions from baseline in spleen length at any time. Improvements in MF-SAF TSS were seen in 80.0%, 72.7%, and 72.2% of intermediate-1, intermediate-2, and high-risk patients, respectively. Consistent with other studies of ruxolitinib, the most common haematological adverse events were anaemia and thrombocytopenia. Results indicate that most patients with myelofibrosis, including intermediate-1 risk patients, may benefit from ruxolitinib treatment.

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