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Lekovich J.,The Ronald relman And Claudia Cohen Center For Reproductive Medicine | Lobel A.L.S.,The Ronald relman And Claudia Cohen Center For Reproductive Medicine | Stewart J.D.,Weill Cornell Medical Center | Pereira N.,The Ronald relman And Claudia Cohen Center For Reproductive Medicine | And 2 more authors.
Journal of Assisted Reproduction and Genetics | Year: 2016

Purpose: The purpose of this study is to investigate if female patients with lymphoma demonstrate diminished ovarian reserve prior to initiation of the lymphoma treatment. Methods: Sixty-four patients with newly diagnosed lymphoma undergoing controlled ovarian hyperstimulation for fertility preservation were compared with 365 healthy controls undergoing elective oocyte cryopreservation (controlled ovarian hyperstimulation (COH)) and 128 patients with other types of malignancy prompting fertility preservation. The data of all lymphoma patients, all elective, and all the patients with other types of malignancy who met the inclusion criteria and underwent COH for fertility preservation during the study period were retrospectively analyzed. Primary outcomes included serum anti-Müllerian hormone (AMH) levels (ng/mL) and antral follicle count (AFC). Results: Patients in the lymphoma group demonstrated significantly lower AMH levels and AFC and had less oocytes harvested and cryopreserved when compared to healthy controls as well as patients with other malignancies. Conclusion: Patients with lymphoma demonstrate diminished ovarian reserve when compared with healthy controls and patients with other malignancies. This should be taken into consideration when deciding on the dose for COH. © 2016 Springer Science+Business Media New York Source


Pereira N.,The Ronald relman And Claudia Cohen Center For Reproductive Medicine | Brauer A.A.,The Ronald relman And Claudia Cohen Center For Reproductive Medicine | Melnick A.P.,The Ronald relman And Claudia Cohen Center For Reproductive Medicine | Lekovich J.P.,The Ronald relman And Claudia Cohen Center For Reproductive Medicine | Spandorfer S.D.,The Ronald relman And Claudia Cohen Center For Reproductive Medicine
Journal of Assisted Reproduction and Genetics | Year: 2015

Purpose To investigate the prognostic value of growth of 4- cell embryos on the day of transfer in determining clinical pregnancy and live birth rates after fresh in vitro fertilization (IVF)-embryo transfer (ET) cycles. Methods Retrospective cohort study of all patients between January 2008 and January 2013 initiating fresh IVF-ETcycles resulting in embryos that were not more than 4 cells 72 h after oocyte retrieval in the morning of their transfer. Patients were stratified into 2 groups based on whether embryos did or did not grow more than the 4-cell stage on the afternoon of ET. The odds of clinical pregnancy and live birth were considered as primary outcomes. Student’s t-tests and Chi-square (χ2) tests were used as inidicated, with logistic regression controlling for maternal age and number of embryos transferred. Results Three hundred forty three patients were identified for inclusion: 165 and 178 patients had 4-cell embryos with and without growth on the afternoon of ET, respectively. The demographic and baseline IVF cycle characteristics of the study cohort were comparable. Patients with embryo growth had higher clinical pregnancy (13.9% vs. 4.49%) and live birth (10.9% vs. 3.37%) rates compared to patients without embryo growth. This represented an overall increased odds of clinical pregnancy [Odds ratio (OR)=3.44; 95% Confidence Intervals (CI) 1.49–7.93; P=0.004)] and live birth (OR=3.51; 95% CI 1.36–9.07; P=0.01). The increased odds remained unchanged after adjusting for maternal age and number of embryos transferred. Conclusions Transfer of 4-cell embryos 3 days after oocyte retrieval can result in clinical pregnancies and live births, albeit at a low rate. Growth of an embryo more than the 4-cell stage on the afternoon of ET may serve as a positive prognostic factor for IVF-ET cycle outcome. © Springer Science+Business Media New York 2015. Source

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