The Rogosin Institute Xenia Division Xenia

Xenia, United States

The Rogosin Institute Xenia Division Xenia

Xenia, United States
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Rayat G.R.,University of Alberta | Gazda L.S.,The Rogosin Institute Xenia Division Xenia | Hawthorne W.J.,University of Sydney | Hering B.J.,University of Minnesota | And 3 more authors.
Xenotransplantation | Year: 2016

In the 2009 IXA consensus, the requirements for the quality and control of manufacturing of porcine islet products were based on the U.S. regulatory framework where the porcine islet products fall within the definition of somatic cell therapy under the statutory authority of the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA). In addition, porcine islet products require pre-market approval as a biologic product under the Public Health Services Act and they meet the definition of a drug under the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (FD&C Act). Thus, they are subject to applicable provisions of the law and as such, control of manufacturing as well as reproducibility and consistency of porcine islet products, safety of porcine islet products, and characterization of porcine islet products must be met before proceeding to clinical trials. In terms of control of manufacturing as well as reproducibility and consistency of porcine islet products, the manufacturing facility must be in compliance with current Good Manufacturing Practices (cGMP) guidelines appropriate for the initiation of Phase 1/2 clinical trials. Sponsors intending to conduct a Phase 1/2 trial of islet xenotransplantation products must be able to demonstrate the safety of the product through the establishment of particular quality assurance and quality control procedures. All materials (including animal source and pancreas) used in the manufacturing process of the porcine islet products must be free of adventitious agents. The final porcine islet product must undergo tests for the presence of these adventitious agents including sterility, mycoplasma (if they are cultured), and endotoxin. Assessments of the final product must include the safety specifications mentioned above even if the results are not available until after release as these data would be useful for patient diagnosis and treatment if necessary. In addition, a plan of action must be in place for patient notification and treatment in case the sterility culture results are positive. In terms of the characterization of porcine islet products and product release criteria, the information on the porcine islet products should be acquired from a sample of the final product to be used for transplantation and must include the morphology of the islets, specific identity, purity, viability, and potency of the product. In addition, information on the quantity of the islet products should also be provided in a standardized fashion and this should be in terms of islet equivalents and/or cell numbers. The current consensus was created to provide guidelines that manufacturing facilities may find helpful in the manufacture of and the release criteria for porcine islet products including encapsulated islets and combined islet products. Our intent with the above recommendations is to provide a framework for individual porcine islet manufacturing facilities to ensure a high level of safety for the initiation of Phase 1/2 clinical trials on porcine islet xenotransplantation. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

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