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News Article | October 28, 2016
Site: news.europawire.eu

GENEVA, 28-Oct-2016 — /EuropaWire/ — The world is facing an acute misuse of talent by not acting faster to tackle gender inequality, which could put economic growth at risk and deprive economies of the opportunity to develop, according to the World Economic Forum’s Global Gender Gap Report 2016, which is published today. The report is an annual benchmarking exercise that measures progress towards parity between men and women in four areas: Educational Attainment, Health and Survival, Economic Opportunity and Political Empowerment. In this latest edition, the report finds that progress towards parity in the key economic pillar has slowed dramatically with the gap – which stands at 59% – now larger than at any point since 2008. Behind this decline are a number of factors. One is salary, with women around the world on average earning just over half of what men earn despite, on average, working longer hours taking paid and unpaid work into account. Another persistent challenge is stagnant labour force participation, with the global average for women standing at 54%, compared to 81% for men. The number of women in senior positions also remains stubbornly low, with only four countries in the world having equal numbers of male and female legislators, senior officials and managers, despite the fact that 95 countries now have as many – if not more – women educated at university level. Click here for a selection of infographics. In 2015, projections based on the Global Gender Gap Report data suggested that the economic gap could be closed within 118 years, or 2133. However the progress has reversed since then, having peaked in 2013. Away from economics, the education gender gap has closed 1% over the past year to over 95%, making it one of the two areas where most progress has been made to date. Health and Survival, the other pillar to have closed 96% of its gap, has deteriorated minimally. Two-thirds of the 144 countries measured in this year’s report can now claim to have fully closed their gender gap in sex ratio at birth, while more than one-third have fully closed the gap in terms of healthy life expectancy. The pillar where the gender gap looms largest, Political Empowerment, is also the one that has seen the greatest amount of progress since the World Economic Forum began measuring the gender gap in 2006. This now stands at over 23%; 1% greater than 2015 and nearly 10% higher than in 2006. However, improvements are starting from a low base: only two countries have reached parity in parliament and only four have reached parity on ministerial roles, according to the latest globally comparable data. The slow rate of progress towards gender parity, especially in the economic realm, poses a particular risk given the fact that many jobs that employ a majority of women are likely to be hit proportionately hardest by the coming age of technological disruption known as the Fourth Industrial Revolution. This “hollowing out” of female livelihoods could deprive economies further of women’s talents and increases the urgency for more women to enter high-growth fields such as those demanding STEM skills. “Women and men must be equal partners in managing the challenges our world faces – and in reaping the opportunities. Both voices are critical in ensuring the Fourth Industrial Revolution delivers its promise for society,” said Klaus Schwab, Founder and Executive Chairman of the World Economic Forum. Which are the world’s most gender-equal countries? With women on average benefiting from only two-thirds of the access to health, education, economic participation and political representation that men have, a number of nations are emerging to challenge the traditional hegemony of the Nordic nations as the world’s most gender-equal societies. While the leading four nations are Iceland (1), Finland (2), Norway (3) and Sweden (4) – with Finland overtaking Norway – the next highest placed nation is Rwanda, which moves one place ahead of Ireland to 5th position. Following Ireland, the Philippines remains unchanged at 7th, narrowly ahead of Slovenia (8) and New Zealand (9), which both move up one place. With Switzerland dropping out of the top 10, 10th position is taken up by Nicaragua. Elsewhere, the United States (45) loses 17 places since last year, primarily due to a more transparent measure for the estimated earned income. Other major economies in the top 20 include Germany (13), France (17) and the United Kingdom (20). Among the BRICS grouping, the highest-placed nation remainsSouth Africa (15), which moves up two places since last year with improvements across all pillars. The Russian Federation (75) is next, followed by Brazil (79).India (87) gains 21 spots and overtakes China (99) with improvements across Economic Participation and Opportunity and Educational Attainment. Countries from Western Europe – including the three largest economies, France, Germany and the UK – occupy 11 of the top 20 positions in the Index. While some countries have clear room for improvement (Italy drops 9 places to 50; Greece drops 5 to 92), it has now closed 75% of its gender gap, more than any other region. At the current rate, it could expect to close its economic gender gap within 47 years. After Europe and North America, the region with the third narrowest gender gap isLatin America and the Caribbean. With 70% of its gap now closed, it boasts six countries to have fully filled both their education and gender gaps, more than any other region. It can also be expected at the current rate of improvement to have closed its economic gender gap within six decades. With Nicaragua the only country in the top 20, however, the performance of the largest economies – Argentina (33), Mexico (66), Chile (70) and Brazil (79) – is mixed. The region with the fourth-smallest gender gap is Eastern Europe and Central Asia, with four countries – Slovenia (8), Latvia (18), Estonia (22) and Lithuania (25) – in the top 25. Slovenia is one of the top 10 climbers in the world since 2006. Like Latin America and the Caribbean, the region has also closed 70% of its overall gender gap; however, it is not expected at today’s rate to have closed its economic gender gap for another 93 years. East Asia and the Pacific follows next, having closed 68% of its gender gap. This is a region of stark contrast, with a large distance between the most gender-equal societies such as the Philippines and New Zealand and economic heavyweights China (99), Japan (111) and Korea (116). The sluggish pace of change in these larger nations in part explains why current projections suggest the region will not close its economic gap for another 111 years. Four nations from Sub-Saharan Africa – Rwanda (5), Burundi (12), Namibia (14) and South Africa (15) make it into the top 20; more than any other region except Western Europe. The region has closed nearly 68% of its gender gap; however, data suggest that it will only take 60 years for economic parity to be achieved – far less than other more developed regions of the world. But, high labour force participation for women tends to be in low-skilled roles in the region, a factor that will need to be addressed to ensure that economic parity leads to growth and inclusion. South Asia, with 67% of its overall gap closed, is home to two of the top 10 climbers of the world since 2006: Nepal (110) and India (87). Nevertheless, progress in closing the economic gap has been negligible and it could take over 1,000 years to close the economic gender gap fully unless efforts are accelerated. The lowest placed region – having closed 60% of its overall gender gap – is theMiddle East and North Africa. With only Israel (49) in the global top 50, the next highest in the region are Qatar (119), Algeria (120), the United Arab Emirates (124). Like South Asia, progress in addressing economic inequalities has been too slow and will not be closed for a further 356 years at today’s rate. Nevertheless, it is home to some of the most improved nations since 2006 on economic participation, including Saudi Arabia (141), Bahrain (131) and Yemen (144). “These forecasts are not foregone conclusions. Instead, they reflect the current state of progress and serve as a call to action to policy-makers and other stakeholders to double down on efforts to accelerate gender equality,” said Saadia Zahidi, Head of Education, Gender and Work, and Member of the Executive Committee at the World Economic Forum. The Global Gender Gap Index ranks 144 countries on the gap between women and men on health, education, economic and political indicators. It aims to understand whether countries are distributing their resources and opportunities equitably between women and men, irrespective of their overall income levels. The report measures the size of the gender inequality gap in four areas: Index scores can be interpreted as the percentage of the gap that has been closed between women and men, and allow countries to compare their current performance relative to their past performance. In addition, the rankings allow for comparisons between countries. Thirteen out of the 14 variables used to create the index are from publicly available hard data indicators from international organizations such as the International Labour Organization, the United Nations Development Programme and the World Health Organization, and one comes from a perception survey conducted by the World Economic Forum. In this year’s report, a key methodological change relates to the cap on the estimated earned income (raised from $40,000 to $75,000) to align with the UNDP’s new methodology and reflecting the change in income levels since the report’s inception in 2006. System Initiative on Shaping the Future of Education, Gender and Work In addition to benchmarking gender gaps through the Global Gender Gap Reportseries and other topical studies, the World Economic Forum’s System Initiative on Shaping the Future of Education, Gender and Work aims to ensure that talent is developed, nurtured and deployed for maximum benefit to the economy and society by mobilizing business, governments and civil society leaders to rethink education, close skills gaps, accelerate gender parity and boost employment. The World Economic Forum would like to thank Accenture, Adecco Group, African Rainbow Minerals, Alcoa, Alghanim Industries, AlixPartners, A.T. Kearney, The Bahrain Economic Development Board, Bank of America, Barclays, The Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, Bloomberg, The Boston Consulting Group, Centene Corporation, Chobani, Egon Zehnder, EY, GEMS Education, Google, GSK, Heidrick & Struggles, Hubert Burda Media, Infosys, JLL, Johnson Controls, LinkedIn, ManpowerGroup, Mercer (MMC), Microsoft Corporation, Nestlé, NYSE, Omnicom, Ooredoo, Pearson, PwC, Renault-Nissan Alliance, Saudi Aramco, Siemens, Tata Consultancy Services, The Coca-Cola Company, The Rockefeller Foundation, Tupperware Brands Corporation, Uber, Workday, WPP and Zain for their guidance and invaluable support of the System Initiative on Shaping the Future of Education, Gender and Work, inclusive of this report. More on the top ten: http://wef.ch/gggr16topten More about the Forum’s work around Shaping the Future of Education, Gender and Work here Follow the conversation on Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn and WeChat using davos_wef


How can the benefits of the digital economy be shared more broadly? How can recent technological advances — from algorithms to apps, and from Big Data to mobile devices — be leveraged to build skills, jobs, and opportunities for more workers? Proposals for addressing such consequential questions and others will emerge during Solve at HUBweek, set to take place during the annual “HUBweek” celebration of innovation and creativity in Greater Boston, where Solve debuted last year. Solve, a project of the MIT Office of the President whose mission is to uncover, evaluate, and advance plausible solutions to human problems, provides a platform for teams of innovators to propose their ideas at events such as Solve at HUBweek. The teams with the best solutions will be advanced to a central gathering in May 2017, called Solve at MIT, where the Institute will convene experts and influencers who can help turn the finalists’ ideas into action. Solve’s methodology is exemplified by the Inclusive Innovation Competition (IIC). On Sept. 27, a group of 24 Solve finalists (winnowed by 70 judges from a field of 243 entrants) will pitch their proposals for how the benefits of innovations can be more widely enjoyed. Winners in four different categories — from how to “re-skill” workers, to how technology can help better match jobseekers with opportunities — will share a total of $1 million in prizes presented during an evening awards ceremony open to the public. Some of the winners will later attend Solve at MIT. The idea for the IIC emerged at Solve last year and was launched in March by Solve and the MIT Initiative on the Digital Economy. The competition is being funded with support from Joseph Eastin, Eric and Wendy Schmidt, The Rockefeller Foundation, The Joyce Foundation, and The NASDAQ Educational Foundation. Eric Schmidt attended Solve in 2015. Making the digital economy work for more workers is just one of several daunting global problems that Solve is tackling through its distinctive crowdsourcing approach, which brings together a wide range of participants from industry, civil society, academia, and grassroots organizations to identify and implement the most promising ideas for progress. “Solve is a natural outgrowth of the collaborative problem-solving culture we embrace at MIT,” President L. Rafael Reif says. “As an institution, we see our role as helping to make a better world. But in this work, we are intensely aware that we need brilliant, dedicated partners from many different sectors and every corner of the world. With Solve, our goal is to galvanize unexpected teams to deliver solutions with global consequences.” Solve’s new executive director, Alex Amouyel, who will take up the reins officially on Sept. 25, says that while Solve began as a collection of illuminating panel discussions, over the past year it has evolved into a robust platform for solving problems. New this year are five challenges across Solve’s four signature pillars — Make, Learn, Fuel, and Cure — which together have generated more than 100 proposed solutions from a diverse range of organizations. On Sept. 28 at the MIT Media Lab, for example, participants in the two challenges for the Fuel pillar will present their ideas for how to remove and sequester carbon from the atmosphere, and how new digital technologies can be used to help put a price on emissions of carbon dioxide and other greenhouse gases. “Semifinalists will pitch their ideas at Solve at HUBweek, and the very best of those will then move up to the next phase, at ‘Solve at MIT’ in May,” Amouyel says. “At that point, we will assess what’s needed and take steps to make those solutions a reality.” Also on Sept. 28, semifinalists in the Learn pillar challenge will present their solutions for how to improve education for children in refugee camps. The challenge leader is Admir Masic, the Esther and Harold E. Edgerton Career Development Assistant Professor in MIT’s Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering. “One of civil engineering’s grand challenges today goes beyond securing shelter, food, and transportation, to improving the infrastructure for and access to education,” Masic says. “Education is not only a basic human right, it is an underestimated component of restoring long-term stability and prosperity in regions of conflict. Thanks to the focus that Solve has brought to this issue, there is a community building quickly, determined to rise to this challenge.” Masic and his fellow judges reviewed 62 proposals. Some address the unique pedagogical challenge of how children learn best in refugee settings, while others focus on developing new platforms for digital education to reach them from afar. “One project pairs volunteer teachers from around the world with refugee students, to do one-on-one lectures,” Masic says. “It’s a crowdsourced education platform for refugees around the world, harnessing the power of e-learning. It is one example of many that we received, that shows how technology can help refugees directly and give humans around the world the opportunity to express the highest aspects of their humanity.” Masic spent his early teen years in a refugee camp in Croatia, after his family fled the Bosnian War. He knows the power of both education and reaching out across boundaries: A director of a local school changed Masic’s life trajectory by letting him attend classes, despite legislation that prevented him from officially enrolling due to his refugee status. “I was able to occupy my time by solving chemistry problems,” Masic recalls. “I became one of the best chemists of Croatia because this man gave me that opportunity. To keep these children out of trouble and guarantee them a future, we need to act quickly, with efficient, deliverable solutions.” Masic is optimistic that Solve can help create more stories like his, by identifying scalable solutions to benefit millions of displaced children languishing without education in camps around the world today. He cites innovative digital learning platforms such as edX and MITx as examples of approaches that could be leveraged. “The essential challenge,” Masic says, “is to overcome the physical constraints of not being able to go to school.” Those attending the pitches at HUBweek will quickly appreciate Solve’s two core premises: The best ideas can come from anywhere, and identifying and celebrating them is just one step on a journey. For the Learn challenge, a group of finalists will be chosen to continue working with Masic and others at Solve and MIT, through the spring. “Our aim is to arrive in May with a handful of finalists, a couple of which will already be developed to the point that they are ready to be implemented as a pilot project,” Masic says. By drawing on MIT’s in-house expertise and broad convening power, and providing technological and organizational guidance, Solve will provide sustained support to the challenge finalists in bringing their ideas to reality. “The real prize is the connection to people with the resources to help you pilot, fund, and implement your solution,” Amouyel says. Going forward, her goal is to generate the widest possible participation. “We’re starting off with the premise that anyone around the world can have a good idea to solve one of these challenges,” she says. “At Solve, we can play a role in solving big world problems by bringing people with fresh ideas together with people who have the resources and influence to help bring them to life.” She envisions Solve tapping into networks to find solutions in places such as co-working spaces in Cambodia and youth tech entrepreneurship forums in East Africa. It is to tap global reservoirs of creative thinking that MIT created Solve, a platform for collecting and sharing ideas and a springboard for implementing and disseminating them. The coming events at HUBweek offer members of the public a chance to engage with these challenges themselves and watch the solutions coalesce and spring to life. Solve 1 took place during the inaugural edition of HUBweek last fall, which was jointly launched by MIT, Harvard University, The Boston Globe, and Massachusetts General Hospital. HUBweek, billed as a “festival for the future,” takes place again from Sept. 25 to Oct. 1. Its program of more than 115 events across the Boston area will include hands-on workshops, interactive art exhibits, documentary film festivals, competitions, and curated conversations on topics such as entrepreneurship and emerging technology, life sciences, and the arts. In addition, some of HUBweek’s many other marquee events include a Sept. 26 civic forum at Faneuil Hall hosted by Harvard professor Michael Sandel; a Sept. 29 panel discussion on the hype and promise of Blockchain, the technology that underlies Bitcoin; and the Sept. 30 Demo Day, showcasing more than 100 of the highest impact startups and companies in Greater Boston’s innovation ecosystem, including more than 15 MIT-affiliated groups. Much of HUBweek’s programming on Tuesday, Sept. 27, will take place in Kendall Square, with MIT contributions such as “Getting MIT on Your Team,” hosted by the School of Engineering, and “How to Scale Your Big Idea in a Complex World,” hosted by the System Design and Management Program. On Sept. 28 and 29, MIT and its Climate CoLab will host its annual Crowds and Climate conference.


News Article | November 16, 2016
Site: www.prweb.com

Intermedix Corporation and 100 Resilient Cities, or 100RC, - Pioneered by the Rockefeller Foundation announced Wednesday a partnership that will see the company offer strategic consultancy and technology for emergency preparedness to network cities of the 100RC. Through the partnership, Intermedix will be working with a number of cities affiliated with the organization to enhance their emergency management programs with direct emergency preparedness and response consultation coupled with opportunities to pilot its crisis management technology, WebEOC. The consultancy and assessment process will help cities assess their current processes, and identify opportunities to leverage the use of technology to assess gaps in their emergency management and public health preparedness requirements and functions. The assessment goes further to help them develop a blueprint for addressing those gaps and better meeting resiliency goals. “It’s vital that cities around the world are equipped and prepared to deal with the kind of shocks and catastrophic events that are becoming more common as the century progresses,” said Joel Portice, CEO of Intermedix. “Effective preparedness today will save lives and property tomorrow.” Intermedix delivers technology-enabled services and SaaS solutions to emergency management stakeholders across health care providers, government agencies and corporations, working to enable crisis management, emergency preparedness and resilience. In the United States, the company’s WebEOC solution is the de-facto standard for emergency preparedness and response and is deployed by more than 50 federal departments and agencies, including the Federal Emergency Management Agency, and more than 500 state and local emergency management agencies. “The work of the 100RC is so vital to resilience around the world, and naturally we’re thrilled to be getting on board as a platform partner,” continued Portice. “In the United States, the industry has years of history in developing processes and procedures for emergencies. However, many of the response structures that are second nature to emergency managers here in the U.S. are not yet implemented around the world.” By being selected by 100RC, Intermedix joins a prestigious group of other platform partners that have been identified for their subject matter expertise and where applicable for their industry leading solutions and services committing to assist cities around the world with resilience strategy and readiness, helping them to prepare for shocks and catastrophic events. This includes disasters such as hurricanes, fires and floods, as well as stresses such as terrorism – which are increasingly part of 21st century life. “We are eager to start supporting the cities enhancement of their own emergency preparedness plans, partner with them as they become more resilient, helping them prepare for the challenges and opportunities that lie ahead,” added Portice. Michael Berkowitz, President of 100 Resilient Cities said, “As these new and complex problems and challenges arise, it’s becoming more and more important for cities to look outside of their own organizations for the expertise and solutions required to meet and overcome these challenges.” “That’s the strength of the 100RC initiative, which brings together platform partners and network cities to build a more prepared, more resilient planet,” added Berkowitz. “That’s why I’m delighted that Intermedix has agreed to lend its considerable expertise in crisis management and emergency preparedness to 100 Resilient Cities.” Platform partners are dedicated to providing 100RC network cities with solutions that integrate big data, analytics, technology, resilience land use planning, infrastructure design, and new financing and insuring products. Other 100RC Platform Partners include Microsoft, Swiss Re, the World Bank, MasterCard and ESRI. Network cities associated with 100RC are scattered all-around the globe and include cities such as New York City, Los Angeles, London and Sydney. About Intermedix Intermedix is a global leader pioneering innovations in data analytics and cloud-based technology to deliver best-in-class revenue cycle management, practice management and emergency management solutions. The company supports more than 500,000 emergency preparedness and response incidents around the world and enables more than 15,000 health care providers to focus on delivering excellence in patient care. For more information, please visit http://www.intermedix.com. About 100 Resilient Cities—Pioneered by The Rockefeller Foundation 100 Resilient Cities - Pioneered by The Rockefeller Foundation (100RC) helps cities around the world become more resilient to social, economic, and physical challenges that are a growing part of the 21st century. 100RC provides this assistance through: funding for a Chief Resilience Officer in each of our cities who will lead the resilience efforts; resources for drafting a Resilience Strategy; access to private sector, public sector, academic and NGO resilience tools; and membership in a global network of peer cities to share best practices and challenges. For more information, visit: http://www.100ResilientCities.org.


News Article | October 26, 2016
Site: www.fastcompany.com

The CEO gender gap is very gradually closing at major public companies, but the way in which the media covers female CEOs may not help speed it up. According to a recent study by the Rockefeller Foundation, articles about female CEOs are more likely to mention gender, discuss their personal life, and place the brunt of the blame on them during times of crises. The small study analyzed 100 news articles from 37 top-tier media outlets that covered 20 Fortune 1000 and major tech company CEOs. The reporting on these executives was observed in four scenarios: when they were hired, stepped down, retired, or were involved in a crisis. The study also utilized IBM Watson’s tone analyzer to measure the differences in language used when describing CEOs of different genders. According to the report, 16% of the articles that covered female CEOs mentioned their personal life and discussed their family 78% of the time. When male CEOs are in the news, however, only 8% of the coverage mentions their personal life, and none discuss their children or family. The focus instead was on their background, retirement plans, or social life. Furthermore, 49% of articles written about female CEOs mention gender, compared with only 4% of articles written about male CEOs. Although it was a small sample of media coverage, the findings are significant, because the way in which CEOs are covered often has a direct impact on their success in office. A recent study by the W. P. Carey School of Business at Arizona State University found that female CEOs are more likely to be targeted by shareholder activism, which the study's authors believe is directly impacted by the way in which they’re covered in the media. "Historically, female CEOs garner far more media attention than their male counterparts, and not for corporate performance and policy decisions alone," wrote the Arizona State University study’s author, Christine Shropshire. "For example, as Silicon Valley’s most prominent woman in a male-dominated profession, Yahoo CEO Marissa Mayer’s appearance, pregnancy, and parenting are frequently discussed—yet these topics rarely surface for male CEOs." As a result of this discrepancy, the public perception of a CEO will differ significantly based on gender. The Rockefeller Foundation study found that 80% of stories written about female CEOs involved in a crisis put the blame on them, compared with 31% of male CEOs. Male CEOs' responses to crises were also viewed more positively, with 25% receiving positive coverage for their responses compared with 20% of female CEOs. The study also found that female CEOs are targeted by the press from the very beginning, with 33% of articles and press releases mentioning the search process when announcing a new female CEO, compared with only 23% that explained the search process that resulted in the hiring of a male CEO. A similar study by Cambridge University Press found that female athletes are commonly described using words like "aged," "older," "pregnant," and "married" or "unmarried," while descriptions of male athletes more commonly use words like "fastest," "strong," "big," "real," and "great." The Rockefeller Foundation study points to a bias that is consistent in the coverage of successful women. Other reports have indicated that such media attention has adverse affects on the public perception of female executives' compensation and their ability to maintain their position without being ousted by their boards. When it comes to female leadership, however, studies have found that companies run by women actually achieve 35% greater returns on investment.


News Article | February 27, 2017
Site: globenewswire.com

PHILADELPHIA, Feb. 27, 2017 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- Citing a desire “to connect national thought leaders to the executives, decision-makers, and influencers we serve,” Diversified Search President and CEO Dale E. Jones today announced the debut of the firm’s new “Lunches With Leaders” speaker series, an ambitious two-year program where prominent leaders from the worlds of business, higher education, philanthropy, healthcare, publishing, politics, and others will headline invitation-only luncheons around the country to share their views and insights on the American and global marketplaces. “As a firm dedicated to finding the best and brightest talent to lead increasingly complex organizations, we are delighted to introduce this series, which will feature some of the nation’s leading thinkers sharing their views on the trends and policies affecting our lives and commerce,” Jones said. The series will kick off at Philadelphia’s august Union League on March 22, when Forbes magazine editor Randall Lane will share his insights and predictions on the business outlook for the nation over the next few years. As editor of Forbes, Lane oversees the magazine’s signature features and events, including the Forbes 400 list of the nation’s wealthiest individuals, and the annual Forbes 30 Under 30 honors. An award-winning business journalist and wine critic whose work has appeared in the New York Times and the Wall Street Journal, Lane is also the author of the critically acclaimed 2010 memoir The Zeroes: My Misadventures in the Decade Wall Street Went Insane, which Businessweek called “a delicious, salacious recounting of Wall Street’s bloated decade.” The second luncheon in the series, to be held in June in New York City, will feature as its speaker Dr. Rajiv Shah, the dynamic new president of The Rockefeller Foundation. One of the nation’s largest and most prestigious philanthropies, the foundation distributes more than $200 million in grants annually. The “Lunches With Leaders” series will subsequently offer luncheons in Miami in September, and in Atlanta in December. Each will be hosted by one of Diversified Search’s national offices. Plans call for a 2018 series that will once again kick off in Philadelphia before producing events in Diversified’s national-office cities of Chicago, San Francisco, and Washington, D.C. The lunches, underwritten by Diversified Search, are by invitation only. Speakers for the two remaining events in the 2017 series will be announced in the spring. The initiative is the result of a “pilot run” of the concept held last December, when at the firm’s request former U.S. Ambassador to Iraq Stuart E. Jones spoke to a gathering of 90 leaders of the Philadelphia business and civic communities at the Union League. His candid and topical remarks on the subject of “The Middle East: The Path Forward,” held only a few weeks after the unpredictable presidential election, offered a candid and provocative insider’s assessment of one of the world’s most vexing conflicts. “The overwhelming positive reaction we received from those who attended the Ambassador Jones luncheon proved to us that we were on to something,” said Diversified Search Chairman Judith M. von Seldeneck. “Several business executives who had not been able to attend called me to say that they’d heard that the event had been highly impactful, and that they wished they could have attended. “From our many years in the search industry we are connected to so many of the nation’s preeminent minds, from all over the corporate and nonprofit sectors, that we wanted to establish a method for bringing these great minds directly to the leadership communities we serve around the country, in an intimate and informal setting,” von Seldeneck continued. “We feel this exciting new speaker series accomplishes that goal.” About Diversified Search Headquartered in Philadelphia, Diversified Search is the largest U.S. female-owned and -founded firm in the industry. Headquartered in Philadelphia, the firm has offices in Atlanta, Chicago, Cleveland, Los Angeles, Miami, New York, San Francisco, and Washington, D.C. Diversified is also the exclusive U.S partner of AltoPartners, an international alliance of 58 independent executive search firms that spans 35 countries across the Americas, Europe, the Middle East, Africa, and Asia Pacific. http://www.diversifiedsearch.com/ http://www.altopartners.com


News Article | November 23, 2016
Site: www.prweb.com

All Hands Volunteers, the leading disaster relief organization powered by volunteers, has been awarded a grant of $150,000 by the prestigious Rockefeller Foundation to establish a Global Rapid Response Fund. The Global Rapid Response Fund (GRR Fund) allows for All Hands Volunteers to pilot an innovative approach to the way disaster relief is paid for in order to increase resilience in affected communities. The aim is to enable responders to immediately launch responses based on need rather than the potential to cover costs through fund raising. The wider goal of the GRR Fund would be to serve as a platform through which to educate donors about the benefits of proactive rather than reactive disaster funding and promote positive changes in donor behavior. In the wake of Hurricane Matthew, this funding enabled All Hands Volunteers to immediately deploy response teams to Haiti, while concurrently directing significant manpower and resources toward the US states of Florida and North Carolina. As a result, the organization was on the ground in Port Salut mere hours after the storm hit and quickly set to work assisting the affected communities. As such, the inaugural use of the pre-funding available through the GRR Fund signaled All Hands Volunteers’ first simultaneous US and international responses to the same disaster event. “We are incredibly grateful for this support from The Rockefeller Foundation,” said Erik Dyson, Executive Director for All Hands Volunteers. “By nature, funding tends to occur post disaster. The whole premise of our model is to get straight in to the disaster zone and immediately get to work, rebuilding resilience and hope in the affected communities from the very outset. This is only possible with the requisite financial backing so this grant is absolutely invaluable to us.” For more than 100 years, The Rockefeller Foundation’s mission has been to promote the well-being of humanity throughout the world. Today, The Rockefeller Foundation pursues this mission through dual goals: advancing inclusive economies that expand opportunities for more broadly shared prosperity, and building resilience by helping people, communities and institutions prepare for, withstand, and emerge stronger from acute shocks and chronic stresses. To achieve these goals, The Rockefeller Foundation works at the intersection of four focus areas—advance health, revalue ecosystems, secure livelihoods, and transform cities—to address the root causes of emerging challenges and create systemic change. Together with partners and grantees, The Rockefeller Foundation strives to catalyze and scale transformative innovations, create unlikely partnerships that span sectors, and take risks others cannot—or will not. To learn more, please visit http://www.rockefellerfoundation.org. Since its inception following the Indian Ocean earthquake and tsunami in 2004, All Hands Volunteers has responded to 69 disasters worldwide, including Hurricanes Katrina and Sandy, Typhoon Haiyan in the Philippines and last year’s devastating earthquakes in Nepal. All Hands Volunteers has enabled over 37,000 volunteers to help more than 500,000 people impacted by natural disasters all over the world and has received Charity Navigator’s highest 4 Star Rating. HOW TO HELP: Those who want to support All Hands Volunteers’ efforts around the world can make a donation at http://www.hands.org/donate or apply to volunteer. For more about All Hands Volunteers, visit http://www.hands.org


NEW YORK, Dec. 15, 2016 /PRNewswire/ -- Today, The Rockefeller Foundation announced its collaboration with the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA), the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), and a partnership of 10 private sector and non-profit organizations to create "Further With...


NEW YORK--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Korn Ferry (NYSE:KFY), the preeminent global people and organizational advisory firm, today announced it has joined The Rockefeller Foundation’s “100x25” campaign, a multi-faceted effort uniting organizations to help achieve the goal of advancing 100 women to the top role at Fortune 500 companies by 2025. The goal of this work with Korn Ferry is to develop a nuanced understanding of the common strengths and areas of development that companies should focus on to build robust pipelines of high-potential women, and create customized organizational and development programs for women that companies of all sizes can implement immediately. “We are proud to welcome Korn Ferry to the 100x25 campaign, leveraging their deep expertise to develop market-driven solutions to tackle the stubborn challenge of ensuring greater gender diversity in corporate America,” said Judith Rodin, president of The Rockefeller Foundation. “As a leading global talent advisory firm, Korn Ferry has the ability to move companies toward evidence-based practices and programs that support development and a more inclusive pipeline of women leaders. Together, we will build an actionable roadmap for companies that have set gender equity goals, but struggle to implement them from the entry-level to the C-suite.” A team of Korn Ferry’s foremost experts in areas including CEO succession planning, assessment, development, research, marketing, and organizational effectiveness will work with the Foundation to achieve the goal of 100x25. “For several decades, there has been talk about gender equity in top leadership roles. In reality, we have reached a plateau. It has been difficult to shift from the stated desire of companies to have more women in leadership positions to tactical delivery that will ensure women are in the talent pipeline,” said Jane Edison Stevenson, vice chairman, Board & CEO Services for Korn Ferry. “We are thrilled to work with The Rockefeller Foundation to create an avenue to change outcomes and make these ideals a reality," added Stevenson. "We commend The Rockefeller Foundation for initiating such a bold program, one with the potential for such significant and long-lasting positive societal impact.” The 100×25 campaign is part of The Rockefeller Foundation’s inclusive economies portfolio, which is made up of initiatives that aim to create more opportunities for more people around the world regardless of their age, gender, or economic background. Business leaders and companies interested in getting involved can learn more about the 100×25 campaign by visiting rockefellerfoundation.org/100×25 or by joining the conversation #100×25. Korn Ferry is the preeminent global people and organizational advisory firm. We help leaders, organizations, and societies succeed by releasing the full power and potential of people. Our nearly 7,000 colleagues deliver services through our Executive Search, Hay Group and Futurestep divisions. Visit kornferry.com for more information. For more than 100 years, The Rockefeller Foundation’s mission has been to promote the well-being of humanity throughout the world. Today, The Rockefeller Foundation pursues this mission through dual goals: advancing inclusive economies that expand opportunities for more broadly shared prosperity, and building resilience by helping people, communities and institutions prepare for, withstand, and emerge stronger from acute shocks and chronic stresses. To achieve these goals, The Rockefeller Foundation works at the intersection of four focus areas—advance health, revalue ecosystems, secure livelihoods, and transform cities—to address the root causes of emerging challenges and create systemic change. Together with partners and grantees, The Rockefeller Foundation strives to catalyze and scale transformative innovations, create unlikely partnerships that span sectors, and take risks others cannot—or will not. To learn more, please visit www.rockefellerfoundation.org.


NEW YORK--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Zoma Capital and Encourage Capital today announced the launch of the first-ever sustainable seafood investment holding company, Pescador Holdings. As its initial commitment, the company invested in Chile’s Geomar, a leading “shore to shelf,” sustainable seafood company with products sold in major markets throughout the world. The launch of Pescador is the culmination of more than two years of investment research funded by Bloomberg Philanthropies and The Rockefeller Foundation as part of the Vibrant Oceans Initiative. In 2016, Encourage Capital released Investing for Sustainable Global Fisheries, (www.investinvibrantoceans.org) a set of Investment Blueprints to strategically recover the economic value that is lost due to poor fisheries management, and restore ocean ecosystems, increasing the sustainable seafood supply and providing livelihoods for poor and vulnerable people in seafood dependent economies. Encourage Capital also said today that Pescador Holdings would start with an initial $10 million commitment from Zoma Capital, the family investment office of Ben and Lucy Ana Walton. The announcement was made at the Economist Impact Investing Summit, at Time Warner Center in New York City. The event brought together more than 200 leading financiers, institutional investors, policymakers, academics, impact investors and philanthropies to analyze the core opportunities and obstacles to the mainstreaming of impact investment. “We are excited to launch Pescador Holdings with our partner and impact investment leader Encourage Capital,” said Melissa Cheong, Chief Investment Officer of Zoma Capital. “Pescador will invest in best in class sustainable seafood businesses for the long term. We believe this sustainability-focused strategy will allow companies and ecosystems to meet their full financial and productivity potential by aligning the time frame of investments with the time frame of sustainably managed biological systems.” “The Zoma Capital and Encourage Capital partnership marks the first time that a research-based, mission aligned investment company has been designed from the ground up to capitalize on the demand for more sustainable seafood,” said Jason Scott, Managing Partner of Encourage Capital. “Local company, government, non-profit and stakeholder partnerships are equally central to this groundbreaking systemic approach, ensuring the ongoing protection and restoration of fisheries.” Pesacador Holdings’ pioneering investment, Geomar, is a vertically integrated “shore to shelf” leader in the sustainable seafood business, with 20 years of experience working directly with more than 700 artisanal fishers in Chile. The company cuts out middle men by sourcing from as many as 134 capture zones across Chile, and transporting, canning and selling the seafood directly to retail distributors. Geomar’s sustainable seafood is sold in Chile and important export markets in North America, Europe and Asia, including the United States, France and Hong Kong. Javier Denoso, CEO of Geomar, said “We are excited to partner with Pescador Holdings to help us grow Geomar to meet its full commercial and impact potential. With these resources we will increase regional employment in Chile, increase the volume and quality of sustainable seafood sourced from fisherman, and invest in distribution of Geomar products directly to customers who appreciate high quality, sustainably sourced seafood.” Geomar currently employs 150 people – mostly women from the local community in semi-skilled seafood processing roles - at their central manufacturing hub in Coronel, one of Chile’s poorest regions. It is considered to be one of the most sophisticated facilities in the Chilean seafood industry. Pescador Holdings intends to partner with businesses benefiting from fisheries stabilization or restoration, that have the potential to generate attractive financial returns driven primarily by increased volume availability. Moreover, it will work with companies poised to benefit from improvements in supply-chain efficiency, as well as vertical integration and access to higher-value markets. Pescador Holdings’ integrated investments will include fishing companies and fishery improvements that will protect and restore stock biomass and critical marine habitat, and empower fishers and their communities through higher incomes and greater livelihood resilience. The firm designs strategies with impact as the fundamental value that lies at the heart of every investment, generates competitive financial returns, and transforms investors into partners to help change the world.


News Article | February 23, 2017
Site: www.prnewswire.com

NEW YORK, Feb. 23, 2017 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- The Rockefeller Foundation today announced the formation of The Rockefeller Foundation Economic Council on Planetary Health at the Oxford Martin School. This assembly of global experts will demonstrate the economic and policy case for the...

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