Entity

Time filter

Source Type


Tabynov K.,The Research Institute for Biological Safety Problems | Yespembetov B.,The Research Institute for Biological Safety Problems | Sansyzbay A.,The Research Institute for Biological Safety Problems
Vaccine | Year: 2014

The present study provides the first information about the protection of a novel influenza viral vector vaccine expressing the Brucella proteins ribosomal L7/L12 or Omp16 containing the adjuvant Montanide Gel01 in pregnant heifers. Immunization of pregnant heifers was conducted via the conjunctival (n=10) or subcutaneous (n=10) route using cross prime and booster vaccination schedules at an interval of 28 days. The vector vaccine was evaluated in comparison with positive control groups vaccinated with Brucella abortus S19 (n=10) or B. abortus RB51 (n=10) and a negative (PBS. +. Montanide Gel01; n=. 10) control group. Via both the conjunctival or subcutaneous route, evaluation of protectiveness against abortion, effectiveness of vaccination and index of infection (in heifers and their fetuses or calves) demonstrated the vector vaccine provided good protection against B. abortus 544 infection compared to the negative control group (PBS. +. Montanide Gel01) and comparable protection to commercial vaccines B. abortus S19 or B. abortus RB51. © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. Source


Tabynov K.,The Research Institute for Biological Safety Problems | Ryskeldinova S.,The Research Institute for Biological Safety Problems | Sansyzbay A.,The Research Institute for Biological Safety Problems
Vaccine | Year: 2015

Brucella melitensis can be transmitted and cause disease in cattle herds as a result of inadequate management of mixed livestock farms. Ideally, vaccines against Brucella abortus for cattle should also provide cross-protection against B. melitensis. Previously we created a novel influenza viral vector B. abortus (Flu-BA) vaccine expressing the Brucella ribosomal proteins L7/L12 or Omp16. This study demonstrated Flu-BA vaccine with adjuvant Montanide Gel01 provided 100% protection against abortion in vaccinated pregnant heifers and good cross-protection of the heifers and their calves or fetuses (90-100%) after challenge with B. melitensis 16 M; the level of protection provided by Flu-BA was comparable to the commercial vaccine B. abortus S19. In terms of the index of infection and colonization of Brucella in tissues, both vaccines demonstrated significant (P = 0.02 to P < 0.0001) protection against B. melitensis 16 M infection compared to the negative control group (PBS + Montanide Gel01). Thus, we conclude the Flu-BA vaccine provides cross-protection against B. melitensis infection in pregnant heifers. © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. Source


Tabynov K.,The Research Institute for Biological Safety Problems | Ryskeldinova S.,The Research Institute for Biological Safety Problems | Kydyrbayev Z.,The Research Institute for Biological Safety Problems | Sansyzbay A.,The Research Institute for Biological Safety Problems
Ciencia Rural | Year: 2016

The present study provides the first information about the safety of a new influenza viral vector vaccine expressing the Brucella ribosomal protein L7/L12 or Omp16 containing the adjuvant Montanide Gel01 in pregnant heifers. Immunization of pregnant heifers was conducted via the conjunctival (n=10) or subcutaneous (n=10) route using cross prime and booster vaccination schedules at an interval of 28 days. The vector vaccine was evaluated in comparison with positive control groups vaccinated with B. abortus S19 (n=10) or B. abortus RB51 (n=10) and a negative (PBS+Montanide Gel01; n=10) control group. Clinical studies, thermometry, assessment of local reactogenicity and observation of abortion showed that the vector vaccine via the conjunctival or subcutaneous route was completely safe for pregnant heifers compared to the commercial vaccines B. abortus S19 or B. abortus RB51. The only single adverse event was the formation of infiltration at the site of subcutaneous injection; this reaction was not observed for the conjunctival route. © 2016, Universidade Federal de Santa Maria. All rights reserved. Source


Tabynov K.,The Research Institute for Biological Safety Problems | Sansyzbay A.,The Research Institute for Biological Safety Problems | Sandybayev N.,The Research Institute for Biological Safety Problems | Mambetaliyev M.,The Research Institute for Biological Safety Problems
Virology Journal | Year: 2015

Background: Highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) H5N1 viruses continue to circulate in poultry and can infect and cause mortality in birds and mammals; the genetic determinants of their increased virulence are largely unknown. The main purpose of this work was to determine the correlation between known molecular determinants of virulence in different avian influenza virus (AIV) genes and the results of experimental infection of birds and mammals with AIV strain A/swan/Mangistau/3/06 (H5N1; SW/3/06). Methods and results: We examined the virulence of SW/3/06 in four species of birds (chickens, ducks, turkeys, geese) and five species of mammals (mice, guinea pigs, cats, dogs, pigs), and identified the molecular determinants of virulence in 11 genes (HA, NA, PB1, PB1-F2, PB2, PA, NS1, NS2, M1, M2 and NP). SW/3/06 does not possess the prime virulence determinant of HPAIV - a polybasic HA cleavage site - and is highly pathogenic in chickens. SW/3/06 replicated efficiently in chickens, ducks, turkeys, mice and dogs, causing 100% mortality within 1.6-5.2 days. In addition, no mortalities were observed in geese, guinea pigs, cats and pigs. The HI assay demonstrated all not diseased animals infected with the SW/3/06 virus had undergone seroconversion by 14, 21 and 28 dpi. Eleven mutations in the seven genes were present in SW/3/06. These mutations may play a role in the pathogenicity of this strain in chickens, ducks, turkeys, mice and dogs. Together or separately, mutations 228S-103S-318I in HA may play a role in the efficient replication of SW/3/06 in mammals (mice, dogs, pigs). Conclusions: This study provides new information on the pathogenicity of the newly-isolated swan derived H5N1 virus in birds and mammals, and explored the role of molecular determinants of virulence in different genes; such studies may help to identify key virulence or adaptation markers that can be used for global surveillance of viruses threatening to emerge into the human population. © 2014 Tabynov et al.; licensee BioMed Central Ltd. Source


Tabynov K.,The Research Institute for Biological Safety Problems | Yespembetov B.,The Research Institute for Biological Safety Problems | Ryskeldinova S.,The Research Institute for Biological Safety Problems | Zinina N.,The Research Institute for Biological Safety Problems | And 4 more authors.
Vaccine | Year: 2016

This study analyzed the duration of the antigen-specific humoral and T-cell immune responses and protectiveness of a recently-developed influenza viral vector Brucella abortus (Flu-BA) vaccine expressing Brucella proteins Omp16 and L7/L12 and containing the adjuvant Montadine Gel01 in cattle. At 1 month post-booster vaccination (BV), both humoral (up to 3 months post-BV; GMT IgG ELISA titer 214 ± 55 to 857 ± 136, with a prevalence of IgG2a over IgG1 isotype antibodies) and T-cell immune responses were observed in vaccinated heifers (n= 35) compared to control animals (n= 35, injected with adjuvant/PBS only). A pronounced T-cell immune response was induced and maintained for 12 months post-BV, as indicated by the lymphocyte stimulation index (2.7 ± 0.4 to 10.1 ± 0.9. cpm) and production of IFN-γ (13.7 ± 1.7 to 40.0 ± 3.0. ng/ml) at 3, 6, 9, and 12 months post-BV. Prime-boost vaccination provided significant protection against B. abortus infection at 3, 6, 9 and 12 months (study duration) post-BV (7 heifers per time point; alpha= 0.03-0.01 vs. control group). Between 57.1 and 71.4% of vaccinated animals showed no signs of B. abortus infection (or Brucella isolation) at 3, 6, 9 and 12 months post-BV; the severity of infection, as indicated by the index of infection (P= 0.0003 to <0.0001) and rates of Brucella colonization (P= 0.03 to <0.0001), was significantly lower for vaccinated diseased animals than appropriate control animals. Good protection from B. abortus infection was also observed among pregnant vaccinated heifers (alpha=0.03), as well as their fetuses and calves (alpha=0.01), for 12 months post-BV. Additionally, 71.4% of vaccinated heifers calved successfully whereas all pregnant control animals aborted (alpha= 0.01). Prime-boost vaccination of cattle with Flu-BA induces an antigen-specific humoral and pronounced T cell immune response and most importantly provides good protectiveness, even in pregnant heifers, for at least 12 months post-BV. © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. Source

Discover hidden collaborations