From the RAND Corporation

Pittsburgh, United States

From the RAND Corporation

Pittsburgh, United States

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Baird M.,From the RAND Corporation
Anesthesiology | Year: 2015

BACKGROUND:: Concerns have long existed about potential shortages in the anesthesiologist workforce. In addition, many changes have occurred in the economy, demographics, and the healthcare sector in the last few years, which may impact the workforce. The authors documented workforce trends by region of the United States and gender, trends that may have implications for the supply and demand of anesthesiologists. METHODS:: The authors conducted a national survey of American Society of Anesthesiologists members (accounting for >80% of all practicing anesthesiologists in the United States) in 2007 and repeated it in 2013. The authors used logistic regression analysis and Seemingly Unrelated Regression to test across several indicators under an overarching hypothesis. RESULTS:: Anesthesiologists in Western states had markedly different patterns of practice relative to anesthesiologists in other regions in 2007 and 2013, including differences in employer type, the composition of anesthesia teams, and the time spent on monitored anesthesia care. The number and proportion of female anesthesiologists in the workforce increased between 2007 and 2013, and females differed from males in employment arrangements, compensation, and work hours. CONCLUSIONS:: Regional differences remained stable during this time period although the reasons for these differences are speculative. Similarly, how and whether the gender difference in work hours and shift to younger anesthesiologists during this period will impact workforce needs is uncertain. © by 2015, the American Society of Anesthesiologists, Inc. Wolters Kluwer Health, Inc. All Rights Reserved.


PubMed | From the RAND Corporation
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Journal of the American Board of Family Medicine : JABFM | Year: 2017

This study assessed patient-reported alcohol treatment offers by health care providers following routine annual screening for alcohol use in primary care.A telephone interview within 30 days of the annual screen assessed demographics, alcohol and other drug use, mental health symptoms, and offers of formal treatment for alcohol by a Veterans Affairs health care provider. We included male patients (n = 349) at high risk for an alcohol use disorder (AUD) who had not received alcohol treatment in the past 3 months. We assessed self-reported receipt of any offers of formal treatment for alcohol use and associations of offers of formal treatment for alcohol with demographic and clinical variables.A total of 145 patients (41.5%) reported an offer of at least 1 type of formal treatment for alcohol use. More severe alcohol misuse (odds ratio, 1.07; 95% confidence interval, 1.03-1.11) and younger age (odds ratio, 0.97, 95% confidence interval, 0.95-0.99) were associated with reporting an offer of formal treatment.Most primary care patients at high risk for an AUD were not offered treatment following annual screening. Our results highlight the importance of training primary care providers in what constitutes appropriate medical treatment for this population and the most effective ways of offering treatment.


PubMed | From the RAND Corporation
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Anesthesiology | Year: 2015

Concerns have long existed about potential shortages in the anesthesiologist workforce. In addition, many changes have occurred in the economy, demographics, and the healthcare sector in the last few years, which may impact the workforce. The authors documented workforce trends by region of the United States and gender, trends that may have implications for the supply and demand of anesthesiologists.The authors conducted a national survey of American Society of Anesthesiologists members (accounting for >80% of all practicing anesthesiologists in the United States) in 2007 and repeated it in 2013. The authors used logistic regression analysis and Seemingly Unrelated Regression to test across several indicators under an overarching hypothesis.Anesthesiologists in Western states had markedly different patterns of practice relative to anesthesiologists in other regions in 2007 and 2013, including differences in employer type, the composition of anesthesia teams, and the time spent on monitored anesthesia care. The number and proportion of female anesthesiologists in the workforce increased between 2007 and 2013, and females differed from males in employment arrangements, compensation, and work hours.Regional differences remained stable during this time period although the reasons for these differences are speculative. Similarly, how and whether the gender difference in work hours and shift to younger anesthesiologists during this period will impact workforce needs is uncertain.

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