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Patent
The Queens Medical Center, INC Research, Medical College of Wisconsin and University of Hawaii at Manoa | Date: 2013-01-07

This invention relates to a system that adaptively compensates for subject motion in real-time in an imaging system. An object orientation marker (


Patent
The Queens Medical Center, University of Hawaii at Manoa, Medical College of Wisconsin and INC Research | Date: 2015-04-28

This invention relates to a system that adaptively compensates for subject motion in real-time in an imaging system. An object orientation marker (


Patent
The Queens Medical Center, INC Research, Medical College of Wisconsin and University of Hawaii at Manoa | Date: 2013-09-23

This invention relates to a system that adaptively compensates for subject motion in real-time in an imaging system. An object orientation marker (


Kwee S.A.,The Queens Medical Center | Kwee S.A.,University of Hawaii at Manoa | Hernandez B.,University of Hawaii at Manoa | Chan O.,University of Hawaii at Manoa | Wong L.,University of Hawaii at Manoa
PLoS ONE | Year: 2012

Purpose: Hexokinase-2 (HK2) and more recently choline kinase alpha (CKA) expression has been correlated with clinical outcomes in several major cancers. This study examines the protein expression of HK2 and CKA in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in association with patient survival and other clinicopathologic parameters. Methods: Immunohistochemical analysis for HK2 and CKA expression was performed on a tissue microarray of 157 HCC tumor samples. Results were analyzed in relation to clinicopathologic data from Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End-Results Program registries. Mortality rates were assessed by Kaplan-Meier estimates and compared using log-rank tests. Predictors of overall survival were assessed using proportional hazards regression. RESULTS: Immunohistochemical expression of HK2 and CKA was detected in 71 (45%) and 55 (35%) tumor samples, respectively. Differences in tumor HK2 expression were associated with tumor grade (p = 0.008) and cancer stage (p = 0.001), while CKA expression differed significantly only across cancer stage (p = 0.048). Increased mortality was associated with tumor HK2 expression (p = 0.003) as well as CKA expression (p = 0.03) with hazard ratios of 1.86 (95% confidence interval (CI) 1.23-2.83) and 1.59 (95% CI 1.04-2.41), respectively. Similar effects on overall survival were noted in a subset analysis of early stage (I and II) HCC. Tumor HK2 expression, but not CKA expression, remained a significant predictor of survival in multivariable analyses. Conclusion: HK2 and CKA expression may have biologic and prognostic significance in HCC, with tumor HK2 expression being a potential independent predictor of survival. © 2012 Kwee et al.


Allison A.L.,The Queens Medical Center
Hawai'i journal of medicine & public health : a journal of Asia Pacific Medicine & Public Health | Year: 2013

Research suggests that cancer patient navigation improves care, but few reports describe the variety of patients managed by a hospital-based navigation program. Differences in navigated patients by the intensity (low, medium, or high) of navigation services they received were examined. The 835 clients seen by the navigators in a hospital-based cancer center were first stratified by quarter and by four ethnic groups. Randomized selection from each group assured there would be equal representation for analysis of Hawaiians, Filipinos, Japanese, and Whites and even numbers over all time intervals. Five professionals extracted data from these case records on demographics, type/stage of cancer, diagnosis and treatment dates, barriers, and navigator actions. Clients had breast (30.0%), lung (15.8%), esophageal (6.7%), colon (5.8%), ovarian (4.2%), prostate (3.3%), and other cancers (34.2%). The median number of actions taken on behalf of a client was 4 (range 1-83), and the median number of days a case was open was 14 (range 1-216). High intensity cases (those receiving more assistance over longer periods of time) were more likely than low-intensity cases to need help with education and reassurance, transportation, care coordination, and covering costs. Although there were no demographic differences across intensity groups, Neighbor Island patients from Hawai'i, Maui, Moloka'i, Lana'i and Kaua'i were more likely to need help with arranging travel, care coordination, and costs associated with getting treatment (all at P=.05), and patients on public insurance were more likely to have stage 4 cancer (P=.001) and to need help with costs (P=.006). Findings suggest that this hospital-based navigation program is filling a real need of patients across the cancer care continuum. A triage protocol and an integrated data capture system could help improve the targeting and documentation of cancer patient navigation services.

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