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Gurudath S.,The Oxford Dental College Hospital and Research Center | Ganapathy K.S.,The Oxford Dental College Hospital and Research Center | Sujatha D.,The Oxford Dental College Hospital and Research Center | Pai A.,The Oxford Dental College Hospital and Research Center | And 2 more authors.
Asian Pacific Journal of Cancer Prevention | Year: 2012

Present study was undertaken to estimate and compare erythrocyte superoxide dismutase (E-SOD) and Glutathione peroxidase (GPx) levels in oral submucous fibrosis, oral leukoplakia and oral cancer patients and age/sex matched healthy subjects, 25 in each group. Statistically significant (P<0.001) decrease in E-SOD and GPx levels were observed in OSF, oral leukoplakia and oral cancer groups as compared to the control group. Oral leukoplakia group showed lower levels in comparison with OSF (P>0.05). Oral cancer group had the lowest levels amongst the study groups. Imbalance in antioxidant enzyme status may be considered as one of the factors responsible for the pathogenesis of cancer and may serve as a potential biomarker and therapeutic target to reduce the malignant transformation in oral premalignant lesions/conditions.


PubMed | Mazumdar Shaw Cancer Center, Elegant Research, The Oxford Dental College Hospital and Research Center and Karnataka Cancer Therapy and Research Institute
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Journal of maxillofacial and oral surgery | Year: 2015

To test the validity of numerous anecdotal claims of poor oral hygiene status being a contributory or etiology for Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma (OSCC) and to isolate the microorganisms associated with oral cancer, to elucidate their role if any, in oral cancer.A total of 242 OSCC patients and 254 controls were screened. Questionnaires were used to inquire about the past condition of the oral health. Dental caries, oral hygiene status and periodontal disease status were assessed using indices. Microorganisms were identified by bacterial culture methods.Majority of cases (Group-1) (57.85%) never visited the dentist compared to controls (Group-2) (46.06%). Group-1 brushed once in a day (93.4%) and less often twice a day (6.6%) compared to Group-2 (81.1% and 18.9%). There was no significant difference in caries experience in both groups. Teeth missing due to periodontal reasons were more in Group-1 (40%) than Group-2 (26%) (p<0.002). Poor oral hygiene and increased pocket depth were seen in Group-1 than in Group-2 (p<0.001). Streptococcus species (-hemolytic) followed by Staphylococcus species were the predominant microorganisms isolated from Group-1 compared to Group-2 with (62% vs. 66%) and without habits (40% vs. 66%).Tobacco consumption, lack of dental visits and infrequent brushing are significantly associated with increased risk of oral cancer. There seems to be no association between dental caries and OSCC. However, periodontal disease experience is directly proportional to OSCC. Increased pathogenic flora may produce carcinogenic metabolites or post-operative infections.

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