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CLAREMONT, Calif.--(BUSINESS WIRE)--The Pitzer Family Foundation donated $1 million to Pitzer College to support the growth and expansion of science facilities at the W.M. Keck Science Department (KSD), a joint program of Pitzer College, Claremont McKenna College and Scripps College. Since 2002, the number of Pitzer students majoring in sciences at KSD has increased by more than 200 percent. The College also saw a 147 percent increase in students receiving science degrees since 2004. In 2016, biology and human biology were among the 10 top majors within Pitzer’s graduating class. More Pitzer students now major in one of the biological sciences, which include biochemistry, biology, biophysics, human biology, molecular and organismal biology, than in any other discipline. “With this gift, the Pitzer family is pleased to continue its support for science at the Claremont Colleges,” said Russell M. Pitzer, Pitzer College emeritus trustee and emeritus professor of chemistry at The Ohio State University, on behalf of the Pitzer Family Foundation. “Kenneth S. Pitzer, son of the founder of Pitzer College, was not only involved with the original plans for the Keck Joint Science building, but also consulted at various times with Pomona College and Harvey Mudd College about their programs. He and his wife, Jean M. Pitzer, endowed three professorships at Pitzer College related to scientific fields. The Pitzer family is delighted that interest in science has increased to the point that the Keck Science Center must be expanded and is happy to support that expansion with this gift.” Due to increased student interest and enrollment in science courses at each of the KSD colleges, this gift provides significant and much-needed support for the department’s continued growth. “The College is grateful to the Pitzer Family Foundation for believing in the value of science education at Pitzer and the Keck Science Department. Support for faculty and students as they pursue their teaching, learning and research in the sciences is an invaluable gift,” said Pitzer College President Melvin L. Oliver. The W.M. Keck Science Department focuses exclusively on undergraduate science education and provides instruction in small-classroom and lab settings while offering numerous opportunities for students to conduct research. KSD is administered cooperatively by the three participating colleges and is a national leader in the development of interdisciplinary science courses and programs. Pitzer College was founded in 1963 by citrus grower and philanthropist Russell K. Pitzer. The Pitzer Family Foundation (PFF) has continued his tradition of generous support of the College. In 2007, the PFF provided $5 million for the construction of Sanborn Hall in Phase I of the College’s Residential Life Project in memory of Flora Sanborn Pitzer, the founder’s wife. The foundation also gave $500,000 to establish the Pitzer Archive and Conference Center in Residential Life Project Phase II in 2012. The founder’s grandchildren, Ann E., Russell M. and John S. Pitzer, contributed to the development of the Jean M. Pitzer Archaeology Laboratory. In addition, members of the Pitzer family have established numerous endowed scholarships, professorships and an endowed directorship of international programs at the College. Pitzer College is a nationally top-ranked undergraduate liberal arts and sciences institution. A member of The Claremont Colleges, Pitzer offers a distinctive approach to a liberal arts education by linking intellectual inquiry with interdisciplinary studies, cultural immersion, social responsibility and community involvement. For more information, please visit www.pitzer.edu.


News Article | May 12, 2017
Site: www.24-7pressrelease.com

BOCA RATON, FL, May 12, 2017-- John Samuel Faulkner is a celebrated Marquis Who's Who biographee. As in all Marquis Who's Who biographical volumes, individuals profiled are selected on the basis of current reference value. Factors such as position, noteworthy accomplishments, visibility, and prominence in a field are all taken into account during the selection process.Marquis Who's Who, the world's premier publisher of biographical profiles, is proud to name Dr. Faulkner a Lifetime Achiever. An accomplished listee, Dr. Faulkner celebrates many years' experience in his professional network, and has been noted for achievements, leadership qualities, and the credentials and successes he has accrued in his field.A respected and long-standing figure in his field, Dr. Faulkner currently is an emeritus professor in the department of physics at Florida Atlantic University, where he has served for over 30 years.In addition to his status as a Lifetime Achiever, Dr. Faulkner has previously been recognized as a Dupont Postgraduate Fellow at The Ohio State University, visited the University of Sheffield, England, as a Senior Fulbright Research Scholar, and was given the Outstanding Achievement Award and Professorial Excellence Program Award at Florida Atlantic University. Furthermore, Dr. Faulkner earned recognition for Best Sustained Research from the United States Department of Energy, an Outstanding Referee Award from the Editors of American Physical Society journals, and was a featured listee in Who's Who in America and Who's Who in the South and Southwest.In recognition of outstanding contributions to his profession and the Marquis Who's Who community, John Samuel Faulkner has been featured on the Marquis Who's Who Lifetime Achievers website. Please visit http://wwlifetimeachievement.com/2017/04/19/john-samuel-faulkner/ to view this distinguished honor.About Marquis Who's Who :Since 1899, when A. N. Marquis printed the First Edition of Who's Who in America , Marquis Who's Who has chronicled the lives of the most accomplished individuals and innovators from every significant field of endeavor, including politics, business, medicine, law, education, art, religion and entertainment. Today, Who's Who in America remains an essential biographical source for thousands of researchers, journalists, librarians and executive search firms around the world. Marquis publications may be visited at the official Marquis Who's Who website at www.marquiswhoswho.com


"NCCN Foundation is proud to support this important resource which indeed will empower patients with thyroid cancer and their caregivers to make informed choices about their care," said Marcie R. Reeder, MPH, Executive Director, NCCN Foundation. "We are incredibly grateful for the generous support from our sponsors, ThyCa and Rockin' for the Cure, as their sponsorship for these resources gives patients access to the same treatment information that their doctors use." "Thyroid Cancer is challenging because it affects people of all ages from young children through seniors, is especially life-disrupting and stressful when diagnosed in younger patients, and needs lifelong monitoring and management even in low-risk patients," said Gary Bloom, ThyCa Executive Director, and Thyroid Cancer survivor of 21 years. "ThyCa is very pleased to support these important guidelines, which will be helpful resources for both patients and their caregivers." NCCN Guidelines for Patients are easy-to-understand adaptations based on the same clinical practice guidelines used by health care professionals around the world to determine the best way to treat a person with cancer. Each resource features unbiased expert guidance from the nation's leading cancer centers designed to help people living with cancer understand and discuss their treatment options with their providers. NCCN Guidelines for Patients and NCCN Quick Guide™ sheets—one-page summaries of key points in the patient guidelines—are written in plain language and include patient-friendly tools, such as questions to ask your doctor, a glossary of terms, and medical illustrations of anatomy, tests, and treatment.  NCCN Guidelines for Patients and NCCN Quick Guide™ sheets DO NOT replace the expertise and clinical judgment of the clinician. NCCN currently offers NCCN Guidelines for Patients for the following: Brain, Breast, Colon Distress, Esophageal, Kidney, Non-Small Cell Lung, Ovarian, Pancreatic, Prostate, Stomach, and Thyroid Cancers; Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Adolescents and Young Adults with Cancer; Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Hodgkin Lymphoma; Lung Cancer Screening; Malignant Pleural Mesothelioma; Melanoma; Multiple Myeloma; Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Nausea and Vomiting; Non-Hodgkin's Lymphomas; Soft Tissue Sarcoma; and Waldenström's Macroglobulinemia. The NCCN Guidelines for Patients and NCCN Quick Guide™ sheet for Thyroid Cancer are available to download for free at NCCN.org/patients and on the NCCN Patient Guides for Cancer mobile app. NCCN Foundation® was founded by the National Comprehensive Cancer Network® (NCCN®) to empower people with cancer and advance oncology innovation. NCCN Foundation supports people with cancer and their caregivers at every step of their treatment journey by delivering unbiased expert guidance from the world's leading cancer experts through the library of NCCN Guidelines for Patients® and other patient education resources. NCCN Foundation is also committed to advancing cancer treatment by funding the nation's promising young investigators at the forefront of cancer research, initiating momentum in their careers and furthering the betterment of patients through their groundbreaking innovations. For more information about NCCN Foundation, visit NCCNFoundation.org. ThyCa: Thyroid Cancer Survivors' Association, Inc., an international nonprofit organization founded in 1995 and advised by thyroid cancer specialists, educates and supports patients and families through its website, online and face-to-face support groups, one-to-one support, over 50 videos with experts on its YouTube Channel, handbooks on all thyroid cancer types, downloadable low-iodine cookbook, online newsletter, and materials in 10 languages. ThyCa sponsors seminars, workshops, and the annual International Thyroid Cancer Survivors' Conference, as well as Thyroid Cancer Awareness Month, year-round awareness programs for early detection, and thyroid cancer research funds and research grants. For more information visit http://www.thyca.org. About the National Comprehensive Cancer Network The National Comprehensive Cancer Network® (NCCN®), a not-for-profit alliance of 27 leading cancer centers devoted to patient care, research, and education, is dedicated to improving the quality, effectiveness, and efficiency of cancer care so that patients can live better lives. Through the leadership and expertise of clinical professionals at NCCN Member Institutions, NCCN develops resources that present valuable information to the numerous stakeholders in the health care delivery system. As the arbiter of high-quality cancer care, NCCN promotes the importance of continuous quality improvement and recognizes the significance of creating clinical practice guidelines appropriate for use by patients, clinicians, and other health care decision-makers. The NCCN Member Institutions are: Fred & Pamela Buffett Cancer Center, Omaha, NE; Case Comprehensive Cancer Center/University Hospitals Seidman Cancer Center and Cleveland Clinic Taussig Cancer Institute, Cleveland, OH; City of Hope Comprehensive Cancer Center, Los Angeles, CA; Dana-Farber/Brigham and Women's Cancer Center | Massachusetts General Hospital Cancer Center, Boston, MA; Duke Cancer Institute, Durham, NC; Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA; Huntsman Cancer Institute at the University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT; Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center/Seattle Cancer Care Alliance, Seattle, WA; The Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center at Johns Hopkins, Baltimore, MD; Robert H. Lurie Comprehensive Cancer Center of Northwestern University, Chicago, IL; Mayo Clinic Cancer Center, Phoenix/Scottsdale, AZ, Jacksonville, FL, and Rochester, MN; Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY; Moffitt Cancer Center, Tampa, FL; The Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center - James Cancer Hospital and Solove Research Institute, Columbus, OH; Roswell Park Cancer Institute, Buffalo, NY; Siteman Cancer Center at Barnes-Jewish Hospital and Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO; St. Jude Children's Research Hospital/The University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Memphis, TN; Stanford Cancer Institute, Stanford, CA; University of Alabama at Birmingham Comprehensive Cancer Center, Birmingham, AL; UC San Diego Moores Cancer Center, La Jolla, CA; UCSF Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center, San Francisco, CA; University of Colorado Cancer Center, Aurora, CO; University of Michigan Comprehensive Cancer Center, Ann Arbor, MI; The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX; University of Wisconsin Carbone Cancer Center, Madison, WI; Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center, Nashville, TN; and Yale Cancer Center/Smilow Cancer Hospital, New Haven, CT. [1] Robert I. Haddad, MD, et. al., NCCN Clinical Practice Guidelines in Oncology (NCCN Guidelines) for Thyroid Carcinoma, Version 1.2017. © 2017 National Comprehensive Cancer Network, Inc.  Available at NCCN.org. Accessed: May 8, 2017 [2] "Cancer Stat Facts: Thyroid Cancer." Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results Program. National Cancer Institute, n.d. Web. 08 May 2017. To view the original version on PR Newswire, visit:http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/nccn-publishes-new-patient-education-resources-for-thyroid-cancer----one-of-the-most-commonly-diagnosed-cancers-in-women-in-the-united-states-300456776.html


News Article | May 11, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

Athletes with ADHD more likely to choose team sports, which can increase risk of injury A new study from The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center finds athletes with attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) are more likely to compete in team contact sports than individual sports, which could increase their risk of injury. The study, presented today at the American Medical Society for Sports Medicine Annual Meeting, analyzed more than 850 athletes who competed in a variety of sports over a five-year period at The Ohio State University. "We expected athletes with ADHD to gravitate toward individual sports, like golf or tennis, where they have more control, there is a little bit more repetitiveness and they don't have to worry about the responsibilities or roles of teammates or opponents," said Dr. James Borchers, director of the Division of Sports Medicine at Ohio State Wexner Medical Center. "But what we found was our athletes with ADHD were twice as likely to compete in team sports, and their rate of participation in contact sports, like football, hockey and lacrosse, was 142 percent higher." Researchers charted injuries in these athletes as well, and although there is no direct correlation between ADHD and certain types of injures, there may be an increased risk of injury. "We know in young people with ADHD that they do have an increase in impulsivity and a little bit more reckless behavior," Dr. Trevor Kitchin, primary care sports medicine fellow and researcher, said. "We're not saying that ADHD led to injury, but given its known characteristics, it may be ptting these athletes at higher risk, especially in contact sports." Research has shown that participating in sports can help mitigate symptoms of ADHD in children. Doctors encourage parents of children with ADHD to let them try any sport they're interested in, as the benefits of trying and participating in sport outweigh any issues that may arise because they have ADHD. "One of the most important things is having an open dialogue between the athlete, parents, coaches and athletic trainers so that they can work together to give the athlete the resources necessary to be successful in their sport," Kitchin said. The researchers also found that just over 5.5 percent of athletes were diagnosed and treated for ADHD, which is about the same percentage found in the general student population. "This study is a great first step in understanding our student athlete population, the type of sports they play and other clinical conditions so we can better help those student athletes with the sport they're playing," Borchers said. It's estimated there are more than 6 million children in the United States with attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD).


News Article | May 10, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

Flash Global, a leading provider of end-to-end service supply chain solutions on a global scale, recently hosted a group of graduate students from The Ohio State University Fisher College of Business, giving them the opportunity to gain real-world experience in addressing logistics and service supply chain business needs. The event took place April 26 at the company’s state-of-the-art Global Service Center in Lockbourne, Ohio. “As Flash Global continues to define the service supply chain and drive the strategic value it brings to companies of all sizes in the international marketplace, we’re always looking for new, innovative ways to refine operations and processes to meet customers’ needs. Partnering with best and brightest students enrolled Masters of Business Logistics Engineering (MBLE) program has enabled us to design and execute on six engineering-related projects that have led to streamlined efficiencies in aspects of our business,” said Ted Waggoner, Sr. Director, IT PMO for Flash. The prestigious MBLE program is designed to enable students to enter the job market equally comfortable with logistics strategy, the management of logistics operations, and engineering tasks. This internship-like collaboration with Flash, which started in 2016, has afforded opportunities for 35 students to work on projects such as reducing cycle times in the Repair and Configure to Order lines, creation of Value Stream Mapping, Receiving Area Efficiency Improvement Analysis and more. “Flash has benefited from the energetic and innovative approach of these international students, while providing them with access to a world-class facility and the opportunity to develop real-world, real-time strategic analysis for service supply chain solutions through collaboration with our expert teams. We could not be more thrilled with the relationship we are developing with The Ohio State University and its MBLE program. Although we just completed our second engagement, our teams are already looking forward to next year’s group of students and the projects we will work on together,” said Sam Mikles, President and CEO of Flash Global. To learn more about custom service supply chain solutions designed from an integrated suite of services that are flexible and scalable to meet customer demands today and in the future, connect with Flash Global today. ABOUT FLASH GLOBAL Headquartered in New Jersey (USA), Flash Global provides the industry’s most comprehensive end-to-end suite of global service supply chain solutions that support many of the top OEMs in the world with either emerging or established technologies. Committed to a relentless pursuit of excellence, Flash offers an immense global infrastructure that enables companies to instantly scale in 140+ countries, creating consistency, predictability and visibility into their service supply chain. Flash has in-region and in-country expertise across its Global Command Centers, Global Service Centers, and immense network of global stocking and import/export locations to service OEMs’ customer bases.


The study, "Are We on the Same Page? Patient and Provider Perceptions about Exercise in Cancer Care: A Focus Group Study," published in the May 2017 issue of JNCCN – Journal of the National Comprehensive Cancer Network is available free of charge on JNCCN.org until July 30, 2017. "Our results indicate that exercise is perceived as important to patients with cancer, both from a patient and physician perspective; however, physicians are reluctant to consistently include PA recommendations in their patient discussions. Our findings highlight the value of examining both patient and provider attitudes and behavioral intentions," said Dr. Smaradottir. "While we uncovered barriers to exercise recommendations, questions remain on how to bridge the gap between patient and provider preferences." Where they exercise is important to patients. More than 80% of those surveyed noted that they would prefer a home-based exercise regimen that could be performed in alignment with their personal schedules and symptoms. Patients also noted a preference that exercise recommendations come from their oncologists, as they have an established relationship and feel that their oncologists best understand the complexities of their personalized treatment plans. Although patients prefer PA at home, Dr. Smaradottir found that practitioners wish to refer patients to specialist care for exercise recommendations. The practitioners surveyed noted not only mounting clinic schedules, but also a lack of education about appropriate PA recommendations for patients. Furthermore, they expressed concern about asking patients to be more physically active during chemotherapy and radiation, and also expressed trepidation about prescribing PA to frail patients with limited mobility. "We were surprised by the gap in expectations regarding exercise recommendation between patients and providers. Many providers, ourselves included, thought patients would prefer to be referred to an exercise center, but they clearly preferred to have a home based program recommended by their oncologist," Dr. Smaradottir said. Exercise was felt to be an equally important part of treatment and well-being for patients with early stage cancer treated with curative intent as well as patients receiving palliative therapy. For the focus groups, the investigators interviewed 20 patients aged 45 and older – 10 with stage I-III non-metastatic cancer after adjuvant therapy and 10 with stage IV metastatic disease undergoing palliative treatment, both across multiple tumor types. Additionally, the researchers interviewed nine practitioners.  The authors note that while the sample size is limited, because the subjects of the study all hailed from the same institution, the study provides an understanding of how the group as a whole has the potential to influence the practice of PA recommendations. Smaradottir et al note that physician education is paramount and suggest that successful implementation of an education protocol should begin with a multidisciplinary collaboration between treating providers and physical therapy specialists, exercise physiologists, and other sub specialties. They add that the emphasis of such a program should be on a patient-centered approach, making the recommendations specific for each patient. "Indeed, physicians, fellows, and residents who collaborate with a PA specialist through a shared-care clinic visit will gain valuable education about how to discuss exercise recommendations with their patients," said Dr. Smaradottir. Currently, the NCCN Clinical Practice Guidelines in Oncology (NCCN Guidelines®) for Survivorship recommend exercise for cancer survivors. "Physical activity is emerging as an important adjunct therapy in the treatment of multiple cancers, and there is consensus that physical activity is helpful to patients with cancer and survivors in terms of augmenting symptom burden and maintaining overall health. This study highlights the discord between what we think is important and what we do in actual practice as providers. It also highlights patients' desire to remain physically active and to receive guidance from their oncologists regarding what they can and should be doing. Based on the results of this and other studies, further work on both defining what the optimal physical activity recommendation for patients should be and determining how best to train our oncologic workforce to implement recommendations is needed," said Crystal Denlinger, MD, Chief of Gastrointestinal Medical Oncology and Associate Professor, Department of Hematology/Oncology at Fox Chase Cancer Center, and Chair of the NCCN Guidelines® Panel for Survivorship. Free access to this article is available until July 30, 2017, on JNCCN.org. About JNCCN – Journal of the National Comprehensive Cancer Network More than 24,000 oncologists and other cancer care professionals across the United States read JNCCN–Journal of the National Comprehensive Cancer Network. This peer-reviewed, indexed medical journal provides the latest information about best clinical practices, health services research, and translational medicine. JNCCN features updates on the NCCN Clinical Practice Guidelines in Oncology (NCCN Guidelines®), review articles elaborating on guidelines recommendations, health services research, and case reports highlighting molecular insights in patient care. JNCCN is published by Harborside Press. Visit JNCCN.org. To inquire if you are eligible for a FREE subscription to JNCCN, visit http://www.nccn.org/jnccn/subscribe.asp JNCCN 360 is a new online resource for oncology professionals featuring up-to-date news, literature, trials, clinical perspectives on current therapies, and much more. Visit JNCCN360.org About the National Comprehensive Cancer Network The National Comprehensive Cancer Network® (NCCN®), a not-for-profit alliance of 27 leading cancer centers devoted to patient care, research, and education, is dedicated to improving the quality, effectiveness, and efficiency of cancer care so that patients can live better lives. Through the leadership and expertise of clinical professionals at NCCN Member Institutions, NCCN develops resources that present valuable information to the numerous stakeholders in the health care delivery system. As the arbiter of high-quality cancer care, NCCN promotes the importance of continuous quality improvement and recognizes the significance of creating clinical practice guidelines appropriate for use by patients, clinicians, and other health care decision-makers. The NCCN Member Institutions are: Fred & Pamela Buffett Cancer Center, Omaha, NE; Case Comprehensive Cancer Center/University Hospitals Seidman Cancer Center and Cleveland Clinic Taussig Cancer Institute, Cleveland, OH; City of Hope Comprehensive Cancer Center, Los Angeles, CA; Dana-Farber/Brigham and Women's Cancer Center | Massachusetts General Hospital Cancer Center, Boston, MA; Duke Cancer Institute, Durham, NC; Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA; Huntsman Cancer Institute at the University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT; Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center/Seattle Cancer Care Alliance, Seattle, WA; The Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center at Johns Hopkins, Baltimore, MD; Robert H. Lurie Comprehensive Cancer Center of Northwestern University, Chicago, IL; Mayo Clinic Cancer Center, Phoenix/Scottsdale, AZ, Jacksonville, FL, and Rochester, MN; Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY; Moffitt Cancer Center, Tampa, FL; The Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center - James Cancer Hospital and Solove Research Institute, Columbus, OH; Roswell Park Cancer Institute, Buffalo, NY; Siteman Cancer Center at Barnes-Jewish Hospital and Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO; St. Jude Children's Research Hospital/The University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Memphis, TN; Stanford Cancer Institute, Stanford, CA; University of Alabama at Birmingham Comprehensive Cancer Center, Birmingham, AL; UC San Diego Moores Cancer Center, La Jolla, CA; UCSF Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center, San Francisco, CA; University of Colorado Cancer Center, Aurora, CO; University of Michigan Comprehensive Cancer Center, Ann Arbor, MI; The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX; University of Wisconsin Carbone Cancer Center, Madison, WI; Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center, Nashville, TN; and Yale Cancer Center/Smilow Cancer Hospital, New Haven, CT. To view the original version on PR Newswire, visit:http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/despite-evidence-that-it-benefits-patients-with-cancer-study-finds-most-oncologists-dont-discuss-exercise-with-patients-300456186.html

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