The Nencki Institute

Warsaw, Poland

The Nencki Institute

Warsaw, Poland
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Michaluk P.,The Nencki Institute | Michaluk P.,University Utrecht | Wawrzyniak M.,The Nencki Institute | Alot P.,The Nencki Institute | And 13 more authors.
Journal of Cell Science | Year: 2011

An increasing body of data has shown that matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9), an extracellularly acting, Zn 2+-dependent endopeptidase, is important not only for pathologies of the central nervous system but also for neuronal plasticity. Here, we use three independent experimental models to show that enzymatic activity of MMP-9 causes elongation and thinning of dendritic spines in the hippocampal neurons. These models are: a recently developed transgenic rat overexpressing autoactivating MMP-9, dissociated neuronal cultures, and organotypic neuronal cultures treated with recombinant autoactivating MMP-9. This dendritic effect is mediated by integrin b1 signalling. MMP-9 treatment also produces a change in the decay time of miniature synaptic currents; however, it does not change the abundance and localization of synaptic markers in dendritic protrusions. Our results, considered together with several recent studies, strongly imply that MMP-9 is functionally involved in synaptic remodelling. © 2011. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.


PubMed | The Nencki Institute
Type: Journal Article | Journal: The European journal of neuroscience | Year: 2010

The ability to undergo experience-dependent plasticity in the neocortex is often limited to early development, but also to particular cortical loci and specific experience. In layers II-IV of the barrel cortex, plasticity evoked by removing all but one vibrissae (univibrissa rearing) does not have a time limit except for layer IV barrels, where it can only be induced during the first postnatal week. In contrast, deprivation of every second vibrissa (chessboard deprivation) removes time limits for plasticity. The mechanism permitting plasticity in response to chessboard deprivation and halting it in reply to univibrissa rearing is unknown. Condensation of chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans into perineuronal nets and an increase in intracortical inhibition mediated by parvalbumin-containing interneurons are implicated in closing the critical period for ocular dominance plasticity. These factors could also be involved in setting up the critical period in barrels in a way that depends on a particular sensory experience. We therefore examined changes in density of parvalbumin-containing cells and perineuronal nets during development of mouse barrel cortex and after brief univibrissa and chessboard experience in adolescence. We observed a progressive increase in the density of the two markers across cortical layers between postnatal day 10 and 20, which was especially pronounced in the barrels. Univibrissa rearing, but not chessboard deprivation, increased the density of perineuronal nets and parvalbumin-containing cells in the deprived barrels, but only those that immediately neighbour the undeprived barrel. These data suggest the involvement of both tested factors in closing the critical period in barrels in an experience-dependent manner.


PubMed | The Nencki Institute and The International Institute of Molecular and Cell Biology
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Molecular neurobiology | Year: 2016

Mir-132 is a neuronal activity-regulated microRNA that controls the morphology of dendritic spines and neuronal transmission. Similar activities have recently been attributed to matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9), an extrasynaptic protease. In the present study, we provide evidence that miR-132 directly regulates MMP-9 mRNA in neurons to modulate synaptic plasticity. With the use of luciferase reporter system, we show that miR-132 binds to the 3UTR of MMP-9 mRNA to regulate its expression in neurons. The overexpression of miR-132 in neurons reduces the level of endogenous MMP-9 protein secretion. In synaptoneurosomes, metabotropic glutamate receptor (mGluR)-induced signaling stimulates the dissociation of miR-132 from polyribosomal fractions and shifts it towards the messenger ribonucleoprotein (mRNP)-containing fraction. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the overexpression of miR-132 in the cultured hippocampal neurons from Fmr1 KO mice that have increased synaptic MMP-9 level provokes enlargement of the dendritic spine heads, a process previously implicated in enhanced synaptic plasticity. We propose that activity-dependent miR-132 regulates structural plasticity of dendritic spines through matrix metalloproteinase 9.


PubMed | The Nencki Institute
Type: Journal Article | Journal: The Journal of neuroscience : the official journal of the Society for Neuroscience | Year: 2012

Local, synaptic synthesis of new proteins in response to neuronal stimulation plays a key role in the regulation of synaptic morphogenesis. Recent studies indicate that matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9), an endopeptidase that regulates the pericellular environment through cleavage of its protein components, plays a critical role in regulation of spine morphology and synaptic plasticity. Here, we sought to determine whether MMP-9 mRNA is transported to dendrites for local translation and protein release. First, dendritic transport of MMP-9 mRNA was seen in primary hippocampal neuronal cultures treated with glutamate and in dentate gyrus granule cells in adult anesthetized rats after induction of long-term potentiation. Second, rapid, activity-dependent polyadenylation of MMP-9 mRNA; association of the mRNA with actively translating polysomes; and de novo MMP-9 protein synthesis were obtained in synaptoneurosomes isolated from rat hippocampus. Third, glutamate stimulation of cultured hippocampal neurons evoked a rapid (in minutes) increase in MMP-9 activity, as measured by cleavage of its native substrate, -dystroglycan. This activity was reduced by the polyadenylation inhibitor, thus linking MMP-9 translation with protein function. In aggregate, our findings show that MMP-9 mRNA is transported to dendrites and locally translated and that the protein is released in an activity-dependent manner. Acting in concert with other dendritically synthesized proteins, locally secreted MMP-9 may contribute to the structural and functional plasticity of the activated synapses.


PubMed | The Nencki Institute
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Journal of cell science | Year: 2011

An increasing body of data has shown that matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9), an extracellularly acting, Zn(2+)-dependent endopeptidase, is important not only for pathologies of the central nervous system but also for neuronal plasticity. Here, we use three independent experimental models to show that enzymatic activity of MMP-9 causes elongation and thinning of dendritic spines in the hippocampal neurons. These models are: a recently developed transgenic rat overexpressing autoactivating MMP-9, dissociated neuronal cultures, and organotypic neuronal cultures treated with recombinant autoactivating MMP-9. This dendritic effect is mediated by integrin 1 signalling. MMP-9 treatment also produces a change in the decay time of miniature synaptic currents; however, it does not change the abundance and localization of synaptic markers in dendritic protrusions. Our results, considered together with several recent studies, strongly imply that MMP-9 is functionally involved in synaptic remodelling.

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