The National Center for Scientific Research

LAAS, France

The National Center for Scientific Research

LAAS, France
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ABIVAX (Euronext Paris: FR0012333284 – ABVX), an innovative biotechnology company targeting the immune system to eliminate viral diseases using its unique technology platforms, congratulates today Prof. Jamal Tazi, inventor of ABX464, ABIVAX’s lead drug candidate for inducing a functional cure for HIV, and Member of its Executive Committee, on receiving the CNRS Medal of Innovation 2017. The medal, which will be awarded today at a ceremony attended by Mrs. Frédérique Vidal, French Minister of Higher Education, Research and Innovation, is in recognition of outstanding research in fields related to technology, medicine or the social sciences. Jamal Tazi is a Professor of Functional Genomics at the University of Montpellier, Senior Member at the University Institute of France and Deputy Director of the Health Center Biology "Rabelais" responsible for education and training. After a thesis on molecular and cellular biology defended in 1988, he completed a postdoctoral fellowship at the Research Institute of Molecular Pathology (Vienna, Austria), before joining the CNRS in 1990. For 20 years, he led the team "messenger RNA metabolism in metazoans" within the Institute for Molecular Genetics in Montpellier (IGMM) where he made important contributions in the understanding of the fundamental mechanisms of the expression of our genes and editing of their products. These discoveries are used today in the medical field through the development of a new therapy based on the use of small molecules to fight against viral infections and to correct anomalies of gene expression responsible for many cancers. In 2008, Truffle Capital’s Managing Director, Dr. Philippe Pouletty, founded Splicos in collaboration with Prof. Jamal Tazi and the CNRS with an exclusive global licensing agreement on Prof. Tazi’s patent application on small molecules modulating RNA biogenesis. Under the impetus of Truffle Capital, ABIVAX was founded in December 2013 by merging three French biotech companies (Wittycell, Splicos and Zophis). The company’s research activities are located in its cooperative lab with the CNRS in Montpellier. In June 2015, ABIVAX completed the largest biotech IPO in France in terms of the amount raised on Euronext Paris. “I am honored to receive the CNRS Medal of Innovation 2017, which rewards not only my work but also the dedication and commitment of my teams which have been fighting to find a cure to HIV for many years. The announcement by ABIVAX in May 2017 of the first ever evidence of treatment-induced reduction in HIV reservoir, using ABX464, provides great hope for the HIV-community. We have come a long way, but we still have more work to do. Our goal is to find a cure for the millions of people infected with the virus,” said Prof. Jamal Tazi. “We are very proud to count on Prof. Jamal Tazi as a colleague and a friend. His commitment to finding a cure for HIV is a key driver in our work. In the name of all ABIVAX team members, I would like to congratulate him on receiving this prestigious recognition from the CNRS, and we are looking forward to his continued contributions to our mission to bringing novel treatments to patients with HIV and other life-threatening viral diseases,” said Prof. Hartmut Ehrlich, M.D., CEO of ABIVAX. The National Center for Scientific Research or CNRS is a public organization under the responsibility of the French Ministry of Education and Research. The CNRS Medal of Innovation, created in 2011, rewards outstanding scientific research with innovative applications in the technological, therapeutic and societal fields, thus promoting French scientific research. Every year, a jury hands out up to five medals to researchers and engineers, either from CNRS or within other research organizations, universities and higher-education institutions, or to industrial partners involved in research initiatives. For more information, refer to http://www.cnrs.fr/en/research/awards/innovation.htm. ABIVAX is an innovative biotechnology company focused on targeting the immune system to eliminate viral disease. To do this ABIVAX leverages three technology platforms for drug discovery: antiviral, immune enhancing and polyclonal antibodies. ABX464, its most advanced compound, is currently in Phase II clinical trials to test its ability to enable a functional cure for patients with HIV/AIDS. It is a first-in-class oral small antiviral molecule which blocks HIV replication through a unique mechanism of action and, separately, also has a strong anti-inflammatory effect. In addition, ABIVAX is advancing a clinical stage immune enhancer as well as multiple preclinical candidates against additional viral targets (i.e. Chikungunya, Ebola, Dengue); several of these compounds are planned to enter clinical development within the next 18 months. ABIVAX is listed on Euronext compartment B (ISIN: FR0012333284 – Mnémo: ABVX). More information on the company is available at www.abivax.com.


Findlay H.S.,Plymouth Marine Laboratory | Gibson G.,University of Alaska Fairbanks | Kedra M.,University of Maryland College Park | Kedra M.,Polish Academy of Sciences | And 10 more authors.
Polar Research | Year: 2015

The Arctic Ocean is one of the fastest changing oceans, plays an important role in global carbon cycling and yet is a particularly challenging ocean to study. Hence, observations tend to be relatively sparse in both space and time. How the Arctic functions, geophysically, but also ecologically, can have significant consequences for the internal cycling of carbon, and subsequently influence carbon export, atmospheric CO2 uptake and food chain productivity. Here we assess the major carbon pools and associated processes, specifically summarizing the current knowledge of each of these processes in terms of data availability and ranges of rates and values for four geophysical Arctic Ocean domains originally described by Carmack & Wassmann (2006): inflow shelves, which are Pacific-influenced and Atlantic-influenced; interior, river-influenced shelves; and central basins. We attempt to bring together knowledge of the carbon cycle with the ecosystem within each of these different geophysical settings, in order to provide specialist information in a holistic context. We assess the current state of models and how they can be improved and/or used to provide assessments of the current and future functioning when observational data are limited or sparse. In doing so, we highlight potential links in the physical oceanographic regime, primary production and the flow of carbon within the ecosystem that will change in the future. Finally, we are able to highlight priority areas for research, taking a holistic pan-Arctic approach. © 2015 H.S. Findlay et al.


Augustyniak I.,Wroclaw University of Technology | Knapkiewicz P.,Wroclaw University of Technology | Sarelo K.,Wroclaw University of Technology | Dziuban J.A.,Wroclaw University of Technology | And 4 more authors.
Sensors and Actuators, A: Physical | Year: 2015

The silicon-glass MEMS high dose radiation sensor with the optical read-out, acting above 10. kGy has been presented. The sensor consists of a microchamber filled with small portion of high density polyethylene (HDPE) and thin silicon membrane. The principle of operation of the sensor is based on radiolysis effect of the HDPE which, upon radiation exposure, releases the hydrogen. The hydrogen increases the pressure inside the microchamber causing the deflection of the membrane, which is proportional to the pressure, thus to radiation dose. The sensor has been irradiated with high energy electron beam with dose 5. ÷. 40 kGy. The displacement of the membrane has been detected by optical interferometer. The relative generated pressure inside the sensor chamber has been found very high (up to 180. kPa). It shows that response of a micro-scaled MEMS sensor is much more effective in comparison to macro-scaled solutions. © 2015 Elsevier B.V.

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