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Mostafa S.E.,The National Center for Agricultural Research and Extension | Karam N.S.,Jordan University of Science and Technology | Shibli R.A.,University of Jordan | Alali F.Q.,Jordan University of Science and Technology
Plant Cell, Tissue and Organ Culture | Year: 2010

A protocol for micropropagation of Arbutus andrachne from seeds was developed. Results indicated that none of the seeds cultured on Murashige and Skoog (MS) medium, with or without plant growth regulators (PGRs), germinated. Seeds soaked in 250 mg l-1 gibberellic acid (GA3) at 4°C for 3 days, then cultured on water-agar medium containing 2.0 mg l-1 GA3 exhibited 80-100% germination and developed into usable seedlings. Shoot proliferation was tested on MS or B5 medium containing different concentrations of cytokinin. No shoot proliferation was observed on PGR-free medium. Proliferation was more successful on MS than on B5 medium. On both media, the most successful proliferation was obtained using zeatin as a cytokinin type. Rooting was tested on MS medium containing different concentrations of auxin. Rooting failed on PGR-free medium and on medium containing indole-3-acetic acid (IAA), 0.25 or 0.5 mg l-1 indole-3-butyric acid (IBA), or 0.25, 0.5 or 2.0 mg l-1 α-naphthaleneacetic acid (NAA). Rooting (40%) was most successful with 1.0 mg l-1 NAA. Rooted plantlets exhibited 80% survival in all mixtures of peatmoss and perlite, and acclimatized plants were successfully grown in the greenhouse. Quantitative analysis of arbutin performed on in vivo and in vitro leaves using high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) revealed that in vivo leaves contained higher arbutin content (0.3-0.81% w/w) than in vitro leaves (0.09% w/w). The highest yield of arbutin in vivo was detected in leaves collected in August, and the lowest yield in leaves collected in December. © 2010 Springer Science+Business Media B.V.


Fandi M.,The National Center for Agricultural Research and Extension | Muhtaseb J.,The National Center for Agricultural Research and Extension | Hussein M.,The National Center for Agricultural Research and Extension
Journal of Central European Agriculture | Year: 2010

This study concluded that high concentration of N, P and K in the nutrient solution gave higher total yield and tomato fruit weight than the control nutrient solution in tuff culture grown tomato. High phosphorus concentration (100 ppm) in the nutrient solution gave the highest total and marketable yield, number of marketable fruits and yield per plant, while low phosphorus concentration (20 ppm) gave the highest total soluble solids and titratable acids content in tuff culture grown tomato. The control nutrient solution gave the least total soluble solids, titratable acidity content and the highest pH of tomato juice.

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