Goyang, South Korea
Goyang, South Korea

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Shin H.-R.,International Agency for Research on Cancer | Oh J.-K.,National Cancer Control Institute | Lim M.K.,National Cancer Control Institute | Kong H.-J.,The Korea Central Cancer Registry | And 5 more authors.
Journal of Korean Medical Science | Year: 2010

In 2009, infection with the liver fluke Clonorchis sinensis (C. sinensis) was classified as "carcinogenic to humans" (Group 1) based on its involvement in the etiology of cholangiocarcinoma by the International Agency for Research on Cancer. However, little is known about the descriptive epidemiology of cholangiocarcinoma in Korea. We examined incidence trends of intrahepatic and extrahepatic cholangiocarcinomas, using data from the Korea National Cancer Incidence database for 1999-2005. The prevalence of C. sinensis infection was estimated from a recent population-based survey in rural endemic areas. Cholangiocarcinoma incidence rates are currently rising, even while primary liver cancer incidence rates are decreasing. Annual percent changes in cholangiocarcinoma incidence rates were 8% for males and 11% in females. Known areas of C. sinensis endemicity showed high incidence rates of cholangiocarcinoma. The positivity of C. sinensis eggs in stool samples from endemic areas was more than 25% of adults tested during 2005-2008. From a meta-analysis, the summary odds ratio for cholangiocarcinoma due to C. sinensis infection was 4.7 (95% confidence interval: 2.2-9.8). Approximately 10% of cholangiocarcinomas in Korea were caused by chronic C. sinensis infections. More specific policies, including health education and an extensive effort for early detection in endemic areas, are needed. © 2010 The Korean Academy of Medical Sciences.


Jung K.-W.,The Korea Central Cancer Registry | Won Y.-J.,The Korea Central Cancer Registry | Kong H.-J.,The Korea Central Cancer Registry | Oh C.-M.,The Korea Central Cancer Registry | And 2 more authors.
Cancer Research and Treatment | Year: 2013

Purpose: To estimate the current cancer burden in Korea, cancer incidence and mortality rates were projected for the year 2013. Materials and Methods: Cancer incidence data from 1999 to 2010 were obtained from the Korea National Cancer Incidence Database, and cancer mortality data from 1993 to 2011 were obtained from Statistics Korea. Cancer incidence in 2013 was projected by fitting a linear regression model to observed age-specific cancer incidence rates against observed years, then multiplying the projected age-specific rates by the age-specific population. For cancer mortality, a similar procedure was used, except that a Joinpoint regression model was used to determine at which year the linear trend changed significantly. Results: In total, 247,732 new cancer cases and 74,179 cancer deaths are projected to occur in Korea in 2013. For all sites combined, the crude incidence rates are projected to be 489.8 and 492.2, and the age-standardized incidences to be 350.4 and 318.4 per 100,000 for males and females, respectively. Conclusion: Cancer has become an important public health concern in Korea, and as the Korean population ages, the cancer burden will continue to increase. © 2013 by the Korean Cancer Association.


Jung K.-W.,The Korea Central Cancer Registry | Won Y.-J.,The Korea Central Cancer Registry | Kong H.-J.,The Korea Central Cancer Registry | Oh C.-M.,The Korea Central Cancer Registry | And 2 more authors.
Cancer Research and Treatment | Year: 2013

Purpose: This article gives an overview of nationwide cancer statistics, including incidence, mortality, survival and prevalence, and their trends in Korea based on 2010 cancer incidence data. Materials and Methods: Incidence data from 1993 to 2010 were obtained from the Korea National Cancer Incidence Database, and vital status was followed until 31 December 2011. Mortality data from 1983 to 2010 were obtained from Statistics Korea. Crude and agestandardized rates for incidence, mortality, prevalence, and relative survival were calculated. Results: In total, 202,053 cancer cases and 72,046 cancer deaths occurred during 2010, and 960,654 prevalent cancer cases were identified in Korea as of 1 January 2011. The incidence of all cancers combined showed an annual increase of 3.3% from 1999 to 2010. The incidences of liver and cervical cancers have decreased while those of thyroid, breast, prostate and colorectal cancers have increased. Notably, thyroid cancer, which is the most common cancer in Korea, increased by 24.2% per year rapidly in both sexes. The mortality of all cancers combined showed a decrease by 2.7% annually from 2002 to 2010. Five-year relative survival rates of patients who were diagnosed with cancer from 2006 to 2011 had improved by 22.9% compared with those from 1993 to1995. Conclusion: While the overall cancer incidence in Korea has increased rapidly, age-standardized cancer mortality rates have declined since 2002 and survival has improved. © 2013 by the Korean Cancer Association.


Jung K.-W.,The Korea Central Cancer Registry | Park S.,The Korea Central Cancer Registry | Won Y.-J.,The Korea Central Cancer Registry | Kong H.-J.,The Korea Central Cancer Registry | And 3 more authors.
Cancer Research and Treatment | Year: 2012

Purpose To estimate the current cancer burden in Korea, cancer incidence and mortality rates were projected for the year 2012. Materials and Methods The cancer incidence data from 1999 to 2009 were obtained from the Korea National Cancer Incidence Database, and the cancer mortality data from 1993 to 2010 were obtained from Statistics Korea. Cancer incidence in 2012 was projected by fitting a linear regression model on observed age-specific cancer incidence rates against observed years, then multiplying the projected age-specific rates by the age-specific population. For cancer mortality, a similar procedure was applied, except that a Joinpoint regression model was used to determine at which year the linear trend significantly changed. Results A total of 234,727 new cancer cases and 73,313 cancer deaths are projected to occur in Korea in 2012. For all sites combined, the crude incidence rates are projected to be 465.6 and 459.7, and the age-standardized incidences to be 345.1 and 300.9 per 100,000 respectively for males and females. Conclusion Cancer has become an important public health concern in Korea, and as the Korean population ages, the cancer burden will continue to increase. © 2012 by the Korean Cancer Association.


Jung K.-W.,The Korea Central Cancer Registry | Won Y.-J.,The Korea Central Cancer Registry | Kong H.-J.,The Korea Central Cancer Registry | Oh C.-M.,The Korea Central Cancer Registry | And 3 more authors.
Cancer Research and Treatment | Year: 2013

Purpose: Although the cancer stage at diagnosis is the most important prognostic factor for patients' survival, there are few population-based estimates of stage-specific survival outcome, especially in Asian countries. Our study aims to estimate stage-specific survival for Korean patients. Materials and Methods: We analyzed the Korea National Cancer Incidence Database data on 626,506 adult patients aged ≥ 20 years, who were diagnosed between 2006 and 2010 with stomach, colorectal, liver, lung, breast, cervix, prostate, and thyroid cancers. Patients were followed up to December 2011, and the 5-year relative survival rates (RSRs) were calculated for gender and age group by Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) stage at diagnosis. Results: The 5-year RSRs for all localized-stage cancers, except for lung and liver, exceeded 90% with that for thyroid cancer being the highest at 100.4%. These values for distant stage liver, lung, and stomach cancers were very dismal at 2.5%, 4.8%, and 5.5%, respectively, while it was 69.1% for thyroid cancer, and was in the range of 18.3- 36.4% for colorectal, cervix, breast and prostate cancers. Overall, the 5-year RSRs for all cancer types decreased with aging across all the disease stages with exception of prostate cancer, which suggests biologic difference in these cancer types in a young age group. When compared with US SEER data, Korean patients had better stagespecific survival rates for stomach, colorectal, liver, and cervical cancers. Conclusion: Korean cancer patients showed relatively favorable stage distribution and 5-year RSRs, which suggests potential contribution of the national cancer screening program. © 2013 by the Korean Cancer Association.

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