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Chang F.-J.,The Key Laboratory of Assisted Circulation | Chang F.-J.,Guangdong Province Engineering Laboratory for Diagnosis | Yuan H.-Y.,The Key Laboratory of Assisted Circulation | Yuan H.-Y.,Guangdong Province Engineering Laboratory for Diagnosis | And 20 more authors.
Journal of Molecular and Cellular Cardiology | Year: 2014

Normal high density lipoprotein (HDL) protects vascular function; however these protective effects of HDL may absent in valvular heart disease (VHD). Because vascular function plays an important role in maintaining the circulation post-cardiac surgery and some patients are difficult to stabilize, we hypothesized that a deleterious vascular effect of HDL may contribute to vascular dysfunction in VHD patients following surgery. HDL was isolated from age-match 28 healthy subjects and 84 patients with VHD and during cardiac surgery. HDL pro-inflammation index was measured and the effects of HDL on vasodilation, protein interaction, generation of nitric oxide (NO) and superoxide were determined. Patients with VHD received either simvastatin (20. mg/d) or routine medications, and endothelial effects of HDL were characterized. HDL inflammation index significantly increased in VHD patients and post-cardiac surgery. HDL from VHD patients and post-cardiac surgery significantly impaired endothelium-dependent vasodilation, inhibited both Akt and endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) phosphorylation at S1177, eNOS associated with heat shock protein 90 (HSP90), NO production and increased eNOS phosphorylation at T495 and superoxide generation. Simvastatin therapy partially reduced HDL inflammation index, improved the capacity of HDL to stimulate eNOS and Akt phosphorylation at S1177, eNOS associated with HSP90, NO production, reduced eNOS phosphorylation at T495 and superoxide generation, and improved endothelium-dependent vasodilation. Our data demonstrated that HDL from VHD patients and cardiac surgery contributed to endothelial dysfunction through uncoupling of eNOS. This deleterious effect can be reversed by simvastatin, which improves the vasoprotective effects of HDL. Targeting HDL may be a therapeutic strategy for maintaining vascular function and improving the outcomes post-cardiac surgery. © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. Source

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